2D Artwork and 3D Modeling for Game Artists- P8

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2D Artwork and 3D Modeling for Game Artists- P8

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  1. 324 8. Inorganic Texture Tutorials with Photoshop 14. Apply an inner bevel to the cross to complete the effect (see Figure 8.194). Figure 8.194 Add a dark cross on a new layer, and apply an inner bevel to turn the rivet into a Phillips-head screw. Y FL AM Style: Bevel and Emboss Style: Inner Bevel TE Technique: Smooth Depth: 510% Direction: Down Size: 16 pixels Soften: 0 The rivets and screws will look much better once you’ve scaled them down to size. In the image shown in Figure 8.195, I added a bunch of them, then applied the dripping-rust effect that we did earlier. Figure 8.195 Scaling down the riv- ets and screws will make them look very real. Add dripping-rust effects to crown it all off. ® Team-Fly lease purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  2. . . . And the Rest 325 . . . And the Rest There’s only a handful of stuff left that I want to show you, so I didn’t bother to try to sort everything into separate main categories. Wood I know, wood is technically an organic texture. But this chapter focuses on textures that make up all types of building materials for a scene, so I decided to squeak it in here. As with other textures, you can create wood one of two ways: by taking a pic- ture of the real thing, or by making it from scratch via filters. I’ve tried to re-create wood from scratch, but the best I’ve come up with is something that looks like those snap-together, faux-finish plastic pieces kids get for G.I. Joe karate boards (see the Crate tutorial in Chapter 9). NOTE If you did any of my Photoshop I’ll show you a couple filtering techniques tutorials, the sampler.psd file for creating wood, but only for fun (using had a piece of fake wood I made. pictures of wood is by far the best way to go): 1. Start a new 512×512-pixel RGB image. (Dimensions aren’t critical here, since most of the time you’re only interested in slivers of wood for boards.) 2. Press D to reset your swatches. 3. Choose Filter, Render, Clouds. 4. Start a new layer and fill it with the foreground color (black). 5. Choose Filter, Sketch, Graphic Pen. Use a Vertical setting; this will be the wood grain (see Figure 8.196) Figure 8.196 Apply the Graphic Pen filter for wood grain. se purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  3. 326 8. Inorganic Texture Tutorials with Photoshop Filter: Sketch, Graphic Pen Stroke Length: 15 Light/Dark Balance: 50 Stroke Direction: Vertical 6. Select the Magic Wand tool and make sure you uncheck Contiguous in the tool’s Options panel. 7. Click a portion of the grain layer that’s black to select all the black parts of the layer. 8. Right-click on the selection, and choose Layer Via Cut. 9. Delete the middle layer that has the white stuff that got cut out. 10. The grain is now isolated on a transparent layer above the background layer. Apply a slight outer bevel to the grain layer to raise its surface (see Figure 8.197). Figure 8.197 Apply an outer bevel to the grain layer. Style: Bevel and Emboss Style: Outer Bevel Technique: Smooth Depth: 100% Direction: Up Size: 3 pixels Soften: 0 lease purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  4. . . . And the Rest 327 You can now flatten this image and take long rectangular selections as boards. Kind of sucks, doesn’t it? Your best bet is to play around with colors, or even try the Liquify command (Ctrl+Shift+X) on the grain layer to produce knots and the like. Like I said, though, the absolute best way to make anything out of wood is from an image. Let’s go ahead and make a wooden sign based on wood from a picture: 1. Start a new 512×512-pixel RGB image. 2. Fill the background layer with black. 3. Open the woodpic.jpg file in the Chapter 8 Data section on the CD-ROM (see Figure 8.198). Figure 8.198 The woodpic.jpg image from which you’ll extract some wood. 4. Using the Polygonal Lasso tool, select a board from the image, copy it, and TIP paste it into a new layer. Repeat for a You don’t have to do a perfect second board (pasting it into a new job with the selection. In fact, it’s layer as well), as shown in Figure better to keep your selection 8.199. Scale each board so it fits in the boundary within the border of image. the wood so you don’t have to clean up the edges. se purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  5. 328 8. Inorganic Texture Tutorials with Photoshop Figure 8.199 Copy and paste two boards from the picture into your new image. (I’m using the two vertical boards on top.) 5. Rotate the two boards horizontally and align them so they are parallel to each other with just a slight gap in between. (This is going to be a rustic old sign, so don’t be too finicky.) 6. Merge the two board layers when finished (see Figure 8.200). Figure 8.200 Rotate and align the boards with a slight gap. 7. Let’s tear up and then apply a 3D effect to the left and right edges of the boards to give it some depth. Using the Lasso tool, make a jagged selection along the left edge and choose Layer Via Cut. As shown in Figure 8.201, my selection is only slightly inside of the edge of the wood. lease purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  6. . . . And the Rest 329 Figure 8.201 Make a jagged cut at the end of the boards onto a new layer. Position the layer between the other two. Small jagged selection Move selection layer below the top boards 8. Move the new cut layer from the top of the layer stack to the middle. 9. Apply a drop shadow to the top layer (the one with the boards). 10. In the jagged cut layer, use the Lasso tool to make another jagged cut to its outside border to match the inner jagged cut. Now the board’s overall edge looks three-dimensional and chopped up (see Figure 8.202). Figure 8.202 Apply a drop shadow to the top boards, and cut up the edge to complete the 3D effect. se purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  7. 330 8. Inorganic Texture Tutorials with Photoshop Style: Drop Shadow Blend Mode: Multiply Opacity: 75% Angle: 0 degrees Distance: 0 TIP Spread: 45 Later on, you can use the Burn Size: 8 tool to further darken areas that stand out, particularly the sharp 11. Repeat the jagged look for the right edges at the ends of the boards. side of the board. 12. Link all layers except for the background layer, and choose Layer, Merge Linked. 13. Let’s bind the two boards with a rusty iron, er, binder. First, create a new layer. 14. On the new layer, use the Rectangular Marquee tool to create a selection near the left end that’s slightly thicker than the two boards combined. 15. Fill the selection with the Rusted Metal texture. 16. Apply a drop shadow to the binder with the same settings as before (see Figure 8.203). Figure 8.203 Make a rectangular selection on a new layer and fill it with Rusted Metal. This will be the metal that binds the two boards together. Binder slightly thicker than both boards 17. On a new layer above the binder, add two rusty rivets using the Rivet proce- dure outlined earlier in this chapter. lease purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  8. . . . And the Rest 331 18. Link and merge the rivet layer with the binder layer, then copy it to the right side of the boards (see Figure 8.204). Figure 8.204 Add rivets to the binder, and copy the binder to the right side. 19. Add and scale some dark text to the wood with a font of your choice. I masked and spattered my text selection before filling it, as demonstrated ear- lier in this chapter, to give it a weathered look. 20. Apply a contoured outer bevel to recess the text into the wood. 21. Rasterize the type and cut out a selection where the gap between the boards exists (see Figure 8.205). Figure 8.205 Add text to the wood and apply a con- toured outer bevel. Split the text where the gap exists between the boards. se purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  9. 332 8. Inorganic Texture Tutorials with Photoshop Now just add some finishing touches to your work. In the image shown in Figure 8.206, I put the sign on the stone wall we made a while ago, then added some drip- ping-rust effects from the iron binders. Also, add a drop shadow for the entire sign on a wall to give it depth, and use the Burn tool to burn out those annoying high- lights everywhere. Figure 8.206 The completed wood sign on the stone wall. Glass Doing the actual texturing for glass is very simple if you think of glass in terms of alpha transparency, dealing strictly with a grayscale range. Pure black represents 100% transparency, whereas pure white is 100% opaque. For instance, Figure 8.207 shows a texture with a linear grayscale gradient applied, and how it would look when rendered in the game’s engine. Notice that behind the window you can see objects, but things get more opaque towards the bottom. Figure 8.207 A grayscale gradient texture applied to a window. Notice that the window becomes more transparent towards the darker end. lease purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  10. . . . And the Rest 333 A typical window, for example, would be completely transparent (all black), featur- ing very light gray streaks to represent the reflection of light. Let me show you a quick one: 1. Start a new 512×512-pixel RGB image. 2. Fill the background with pure black (hex# 000000). 3. Create a new layer. 4. Use the Rectangular Marquee tool to make a small rectangular selection. 5. Fill the selection with pure white (hex# FFFFFF). 6. To skew the area for that “glass” look, choose Edit, Transform, Skew, and skew the white area up about 45 degrees or so (see Figure 8.208). Figure 8.208 Make a rectangular selection and fill it with white. Skew it for that “glass” look. 7. Here’s where the transparency comes into effect. Adjust the opacity of the layer to 10%. This opacity will correlate almost directly to the game engine’s translation of transparency. se purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  11. 334 8. Inorganic Texture Tutorials with Photoshop 8. Make a few other skewed rectangles and fill them with white; make sure they’re all on the same layer. Overlap one or two for an added effect (see Figure 8.209). Figure 8.209 Adjust the opacity of the white layer to 10%, making it see- through. Notice the Y effect it has on the FL AM room’s window. TE Decals Decals are simply small images, usually coupled with an alpha channel, that are placed on top of existing textured objects in a game. If you’ve ever blown some- thing away that was near a wall, for instance, and seen blood or slime splatter all over the place, those images were decals overlaid dynamically by the game’s engine. A decal can also be a simple metal sign or something that needs to be placed any- where. The only thing special about these game assets is that they sometimes have trans- parent sections to them, requiring a single color to represent transparency. The channel that represents transparency is a parameter you need to find out—consult the engine’s specifications. For instance, if you’re creating a decal for Half-Life (using the Worldcraft/Hammer editors), the transparent color will be pure white (hex# FFFFFF), whereas a decal in Unreal (using UnrealEd) will be medium gray (hex# 808080). See Table 8.1 for what to think about when generating images that have some sort of transparency, particularly for Half-Life, Unreal, and the Torque engine. Note that levels in Torque may be created using the Worldcraft or Hammer level editor. ® Team-Fly lease purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  12. . . . And the Rest 335 Table 8.1 Game/engine Texture Type Transparency Color Half-Life Decals White (hex# FFFFFF) Half-Life Brush objects (catwalks, etc.) Blue (hex# 0000FF) Half-Life Sprites Black (grayscale, where hex# 000000 is 100% transparent) Unreal Decals Gray (hex# 808080) Unreal Brush objects Black (grayscale variable) Unreal Sprites Black Torque Decals none (uses Photoshop’s transparency in .png format) The only other thing you should keep in mind when creating this stuff is what will be the base material to which they are applied. You’ll be doing bullet holes here, but not every hole will look good on every surface. Hence, it might be necessary to make an arsenal of bullet-hole decals that can be put on a wide range of objects. Bullet Holes People (like me) make a big stink about this type of decal, when most of the time it’s just a silly, feathered or splotchy black hole. One quick squirt with your Airbrush tool will usually do the job, and the resultant texture is an overall 8×8 pixels. But, seeing as you’re an artist, you’ll want to look at it in more detail. Bullet Holes on Metal, Inward This is one of the two most common types of bullet holes: The lead has made a penetrating entry mark that has curved the metal inward. Here’s how to create this effect: 1. Start a new 512 × 512-pixel RGB image. 2. Fill the background layer with pure white (hex# FFFFFF). This will be the alpha (transparency) channel (for the Half-Life engine). se purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  13. 336 8. Inorganic Texture Tutorials with Photoshop NOTE If you’re doing this texture for Unreal (or a similar engine), fill the background layer with pure gray (hex# 808080). Make sure you check the engine’s specifica- tions for alpha-channel colors for decals. 3. Start a new layer. 4. Enable Photoshop’s Snap and Grid features. 5. Select the Elliptical Marquee tool, and in its Options panel, type 20 in the Feather field. 6. Create a circular selection in the middle of the image, about 350 pixels wide, and fill it with the Basic Metal texture (see Figure 8.210). Figure 8.210 Fill a feathered selection with the Basic Metal texture on a new layer. 7. Start another new layer. This is important, because you’ll be applying an inner bevel to this to make the hole curve inward. 8. With the previous selection still active, choose Select, Transform Selection, and scale the selection down about 100 pixels. It will help to hold down Shift and Alt at the same time to make the selection scale down uniformly. 9. Press Enter to commit the change, and with the 20-pixel Feather option still set, fill the selection with black (see Figure 8.211). lease purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  14. . . . And the Rest 337 Figure 8.211 Reduce the selection and feather-fill it with near black on a new layer. 10. You should now have three layers; the top is the bullet hole, the middle is the curved metal, and the bottom is the pure black background. To the top bul- let-hole layer, apply an inner bevel. I set the Highlight Mode color to dark yellow at a 90-degree light angle to give it some finesse (see Figure 8.212). Figure 8.212 Apply an inner bevel to the bullet hole to give it depth. Style: Bevel and Emboss Style: Inner Bevel Technique: Chisel Soft Depth: 500% Direction: Down Size: 20 pixels se purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  15. 338 8. Inorganic Texture Tutorials with Photoshop Soften: 5 Shading Angle: 90 degrees Highlight Mode Color: dark yellow, hex# 8E8D34 If you want to see the results of this hole, just fill the background layer with any metal mater- TIP ial to see the effects. To keep things more real, Group a cluster of different- modify the curved-metal layer (the middle sized bullet holes onto a decal layer) to suit different types of metals. When for shotgun effects. Dust the you’re ready to apply this texture as a decal, areas between the holes using you need to flatten the image and make it very a black airbrush to simulate small. Check out Figure 8.213; these are multi- the blast powder. ple holes on a sign applied in combination with the Peeling Paint procedure. Figure 8.213 Bullet holes applied to a sign in combina- tion with the Peeling Paint procedure. Bullet Holes on Metal, Outward This is the second most common type of bullet hole. In this case, the shot was fired from behind the metal, rupturing the metal outward. The actual physics involved are like this: The bullet was traveling around the speed of sound. After piercing the metal, the bullet’s speed would cause the metal to whip open, creating intense heat and fatigue in a very short period of time. This might cause the metal to curl, dis- tort, and discolor . . . so here we go: 1. Start a new 512×512-pixel RGB image. lease purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  16. . . . And the Rest 339 2. Fill the background layer with pure gray (hex# 808080). NOTE 3. Start a new layer. I’m pretending this is a decal for Unreal. If this were for Half-Life, I’d 4. Press D to reset the swatches. use pure white (hex# FFFFFF). 5. Choose Filter, Render, Clouds. 6. Choose Filter, Render, Difference Clouds (see Figure 8.214). Figure 8.214 Apply the Clouds, then the Difference Clouds filter to a new layer. 7. Choose Filter, Blur, Gaussian Blur, with a radius of 4.0 pixels. 8. Choose Filter, Sketch, Chrome. 9. Adjust the levels by sliding the Highlights marker to the left. This will give the texture the appearance of fatigued (or liquid) metal (see Figure 8.215). Figure 8.215 Apply the Gaussian Blur and Chrome fil- ters. Adjust the levels to make the texture look like fatigued steel. se purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  17. 340 8. Inorganic Texture Tutorials with Photoshop Filter: Blur, Gaussian Blur Radius: 4.0 pixels Filter: Sketch, Chrome Detail: 10 Smoothness: 0 10. With the fatigued-metal layer active, choose Edit, Transform, Scale, and scale the image down evenly about 50% (see Figure 8.216). Figure 8.216 Scale the metal layer down 50%. 11. Start a new layer. 12. Set your foreground color to black. 13. Using the Airbrush tool (with its brush type set to Soft Round 100 pixels), spray a hole in the middle of the metal. (The paint should be on a separate layer.) lease purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  18. . . . And the Rest 341 14. Apply an inner bevel to this layer with a medium-gray Highlight Mode color (see Figure 8.217). Figure 8.217 Spray an off-black circle on a new layer, and apply an inner bevel to it. Style: Bevel and Emboss Style: Inner Bevel Technique: Chisel Soft Depth: 500% Direction: Down Size: 10 pixels Soften: 0 Shading Angle: 90 degrees Highlight Mode Color: medium-gray, hex# 757373 15. Select the metal layer (it should be the one in between the background and the bullet hole). se purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  19. 342 8. Inorganic Texture Tutorials with Photoshop 16. Use the Lasso tool to create a jagged selection around the bullet hole. This will be the pattern of the outwardly bent metal (see Figure 8.218). Figure 8.218 Use the Lasso tool to select a jagged bor- der around the bullet hole. 17. Choose Select, Inverse. You’ll be deleting the outside portion of the metal from this selection. 18. Now let’s chop up the edges of the selection. First, press Q to enter Quick Mask mode. 19. With the mask active, choose Filter, Brush Strokes, Spatter. 20. Press Q to exit Quick Mask mode. 21. Press Delete to remove the outside metal (see Figure 8.219). Figure 8.219 Spatter the selection in Quick Mask mode, then delete the outer portion of the metal. lease purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  20. . . . And the Rest 343 Filter: Brush Strokes, Spatter Spray Radius: 10 Smoothness: 5 22. Apply a small drop shadow to the metal layer to give it some height off the surface. 23. Use the Dodge tool to add highlights around the rim near the hole, and use the Burn tool to darken the edges where the metal appears torn (see Figure 8.220). This will make the metal appear to be curving up and down. Figure 8.220 Apply a drop shadow to the metal, then dodge and burn the inside and outside to give it a curved feel. Style: Drop Shadow Blend Mode: Multiply Opacity: 75 Angle: 90 Distance: 7 Spread: 0 Size: 5 And there you have it! You can merge the hole and metal layers, then scale every- thing to size. Try filling the blue background layer with a metal texture to see the end effect. se purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
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