CANINE

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CANINE

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  1. CANINE Brrenda Hoddiinott B enda Hodd nott I-02 BEGINNER: CARTOONS & CRITTERS This project challenges you to draw two dog noses from slightly different perspectives. You may find the lessons in D Beginner: Squirkling extremely helpful as you try your hand at squirkling graduations of textured shading. This lesson is divided into the following two parts: FRONTAL VIEW OF A DOG NOSE: You draw a simple frontal view of a dog nose, while being challenged to rely on visual skills rather than text instructions. ANGULAR VIEW OF A DOG NOSE: People who love dogs simply can’t resist that adorable tilt of their heads as they look at your face and listen attentively. Naturally, when the head is tilted, the nose must also be drawn at an angle. Suggested drawing supplies include good quality white drawing paper, graphite pencils, kneaded and vinyl erasers, and a pencil sharpener. 12 PAGES – 28 ILLUSTRATIONS This project is recommended for artists from age 12 to adult, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada – 2004 (Revised 2006)
  2. -2- FRONTAL VIEW OF A DOG NOSE This lesson challenges you to rely on your visual skills rather than text instructions. The initial sketch lines throughout Steps 1 to 4 establish proportions. A Sketch is a simple drawing that captures the integral aspects of your subject quickly and efficiently. Proportion is the relationship in size of one component of a drawing to another or others. STEP 1 STEP 2 The sketch lines and the outlines look dark in many of my illustrations. However, in reality they are so light that I can barely see them. I have made them look darker in a computer program so you can see them. Keep your lines very light by pressing very gently with your pencil (I used an HB). No matter how careful you are, accidents do happen, and you may need to erase sections you aren’t happy with. STEP 3 STEP 4 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  3. -3- In steps 5 to 15 you outline the nose, and add a few sections of fur above and below it. STEP 5 STEP 6 The faint lines used to indicate the fur above and below the nose are ragged and uneven, and are also various lengths and thicknesses. As you sketch, constantly check the relationships of lines and spaces to one another. Note whether the sizes and proportions are accurate, and adjust as needed. Pay close attention to the shapes created by the spaces. STEP 7 STEP 8 As you complete each step, compare your drawing to mine to make sure you haven’t missed something. If you’re not happy with some of the lines you draw, simply erase that section, redraw the lines, and keep on going. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  4. -4- STEP 9 STEP 10 STEP 12 A kneaded eraser works well for erasing rough sketch lines. STEP 11 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  5. -5- STEP 13 STEP 14 Draw slowly! Accuracy is more important than speed. Your speed will automatically improve the more you practice. Don’t forget that you can turn your sketchbook around as you draw. STEP 15 Always place a piece of clean paper under your Remember, hand as you draw. learning to Each time you work on a new section, see as an remember to move your artist is the paper so it’s always very under your hand. foundation This prevents you from of smudging your drawing, and protects drawing. the paper from the oils in your skin. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  6. -6- STEP 16 In steps 16 to 18, you add shading to the nose with squirkling. Squirkling is an easy method of shading, in which randomly drawn curved lines (called squirkles) combine squiggles and scribbles with circles to create textured values. Texture is the surface detail of an object, as defined in a drawing with various shading techniques. The senses of touch and sight help identify the surface texture of drawing subject. Values are the different shades of gray created when you draw by varying both the density of the shading lines, and the pressure used in holding various pencils. Before you begin shading, use your kneaded eraser to lighten your lines until they are so light that you can barely see them. STEP 17 Consider using the following pencils: 2H - primary highlight (A highlight is the brightest area of a form where light bounces off its surface and is usually the section closest to the light source) HB - highlights on the nostrils and the light values surrounding the primary highlight. 2B - darker shading in the shadow sections 4B - darkest values inside the nostrils Keep in mind that you can achieve a full range of different values with squirkling by using various pencils, and by varying the density of the lines and the pressure used in holding your pencils. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  7. -7- STEP 18 A full range of values gives contrast between the light and the shadow areas. Contrast refers to the comparison of different values when put beside one another, and an invaluable tool for heightening the effects of composition. A combination of dots and tiny squirkle lines provides the fun texture to all sections of the nose. To make a section darker simply add more squirkling lines. To lighten a section, pat it very gently and carefully with a kneaded eraser that is molded to a point. Examine the nose you just drew as part of a drawing of a Jack Russell named Isaac. Sign your name, put today’s date on the back of your drawing, and put a big smile on your face! Continue on to the next section and try your hand at drawing a dog nose from an angle, which is slightly more challenging. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  8. -8- ANGULAR VIEW OF A DOG NOSE People who love dogs simply can’t resist that adorable tilt of their heads as they look into your eyes and listen attentively. Naturally, when the head is tilted, the nose is also drawn at an angle. ILLUSTRATION 02-01 1. Lightly sketch the shape of a dog nose at an angle. Take note of how the nostril on the right is considerably higher than the other. Also, the lines outlining the overall shape of the nose are at an angle rather than horizontal and vertical. ILLUSTRATION 02-02 2. Redraw the outline of the nose with nice neat lines. Take note of the shape of the lower part of the nose and the v-shape in the center of the very bottom section. ILLUSTRATION 02-03 To keep your drawing neat, erase the rough sketch lines as you complete each section. 3. Add the outlines of the nostrils. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  9. -9- ILLUSTRATION 02-04 4. Very lightly outline crescent shaped sections under the nostrils. These crescent shapes will be left very light to help make the noses look three dimensional. ILLUSTRATION 02-05 5. Add two circular shapes as highlights on the main section of the nose. These sections will be lighter than the rest of the nose to help make it look shiny. ILLUSTRATION 02-06 6. Use HB and 2B pencils, and graduated squirkling, to shade the various values. The light source is from the upper left. As you add more shading, remember that the values need to be slightly lighter on the upper left, closer to the light source. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  10. - 10 - ILLUSTRATION 02-07 7. Add a combination of dots and tiny squirkles below the nostrils and on the main section of the nose. 8. Use a 2B to add darker shading to the sections in shadow. 9. Fill in the nostrils with a 4B. ILLUSTRATION 02-08 I prefer to leave the gorgeous texture of squirkles on a dog’s nose, without blending. However, if you’d like to try blending continue on! Blending is the process of rubbing shading lines with a blending tool (such as tissue or paper towel) to evenly distribute the drawing medium over the surface of the paper, thereby achieving a silky smooth graduation of values. 10. Gently blend the lighter sections of shading with a Q-tip or Kleenex. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  11. - 11 - ILLUSTRATION 02-09 11. Use your kneaded eraser to re- lighten the highlights after blending. 12. Add a few more dots to enhance the texture of the nose. Check out this drawing of a Jack Russell named Jumpin’ Jack, and observe the nose you just drew as part of a dog portrait. Add your name and today’s date to the back of your drawing, and go hug your dog! Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  12. - 12 - BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, conté crayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning, and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing and painting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites. Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach to curriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world. LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS BY BRENDA HODDINOTT Drawing for Dummies: Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People: Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
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