Complete Guide to the Nikon D200- P14

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Complete Guide to the Nikon D200- P14

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Complete Guide to the Nikon D200- P14:As with all my books, a full draft was reviewed by volunteers to weed out unclear language and misstatements. This book is better because of them.

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  1. V1.03 To show and move the Highlight indicator between channels on this page, hold the ± button and press the < or > key on the Direction pad. Page 5: overexposed highlights blink—the folder number and file number appear in the lower right corner (100-68 in this example). Here’s a new wrinkle: the RGB, R, G, and B indicators in the lower left blink to indicate which channel (or channels) are being shown as overexposed. To move between channels on this page, hold the ± button and press the < or > key on the Direction pad. Page 6: histogram—the folder number and file number appear in the upper right corner, the histogram overlays the image. You can protect the currently viewed image from deletion (but not from a card format) by pressing the n button while the image is being displayed. A n icon appears at the left top Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 391
  2. V1.03 of the image: Note that protected files are marked with a read-only marker that persists when you move them to a computer. Tip: In Windows, select the read-only file in a Windows Explorer window. Next select PROPERTIES from the FILE menu. Uncheck the box labeled Read-only to remove the read- only attribute. On a Macintosh using OS 9.x or OS X, select the read-only file and press Apple - I (that’s an i) to see the General Information box for the file. Uncheck the box labeled Locked to remove the read-only attribute. Note: The page and image browsing keys on the D200 can be 90 degrees different than those for other Nikon DSLRs. Don’t despair. Use Custom Setting #F3 to set the D200 to match your other Nikon DSLRs. • You can delete the currently viewed image by pressing the p button. You’ll be prompted to confirm the deletion: press the p button again to do so. If the image was protected, you’ll see File Protected when you press the Delete button. Unprotect the image before trying to delete it (press the n button). Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 392
  3. V1.03 • You can display thumbnails of multiple pictures by holding the ± button and turning the Rear Command dial (which allows you to select 1 image per screen, 4 images per screen, or 9 images per screen). Note that whatever choice you make stays active, and that if more than one thumbnail is displayed, you can no longer reach other information pages about an image (< and > keys on the direction pad control moving between thumbnails when multiple images are displayed; the currently selected image is outlined in yellow). You can, however, still reach the histogram page by pressing the center of the Direction pad (pressing it again takes you back to the thumbnail display, even if the display has gone off or you’ve taken additional pictures). 4 images per screen 9 images per screen • You can magnify the view by first pressing the ENTER key to enter the zooming mode, and then using the ± and Rear Command dial to zoom. When you first press ENTER, the following icons are shown in the upper left corner of the image to remind you of how to zoom: Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 393
  4. V1.03 ENTER pressed Thumbnail + Dial Zoom Complete While viewing a magnified image, you can use the ± button plus Rear Command dial to zoom in on the magnified view (center image, above, shows the zoom area as it’s being chosen; right shot shows what you zoomed into when you released the button). When you hold down the Thumbnail button, the Rear Command dial is used to control a visual representation of the zoom amount (size of the bracketed area) while the Direction pad controls the position of the bracketing area. When you release the Thumbnail button the playback zooms to the area and level you selected. You can then view additional images with that zoom level applied by rotating the Rear Command dial to move between images 107. F Image reviewing has a different timeout setting than the shooting mode of the camera (the default is 20 seconds; see “Custom Setting #C5, Color LCD Active Time” on page < 448>). H Don’t panic if you see the FOLDER CONTAINS NO IMAGES message. The camera is trying to tell you that it can find no images in the current folder of the card; that doesn’t mean that there aren’t images on the card. Whenever you see the NO IMAGES message and you know that there are images on the card: 107 Okay, this is a relatively nice and convenient setup, but now we have multiple Nikon DSLR bodies that work differently for zooming. Nikon really needs to pick a method and stick to it for all DSLRs. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 394
  5. V1.03 1. Press the MENU key to show the menu system. 2. Use the Direction pad to navigate to the PLAYBACK menu. 3. Use the Direction pad to navigate to Playback Folder and press the > key on the Direction pad to select it. 4. Use the Direction pad to select All and press the > key one more time. Rotating Images Images are usually displayed on the color LCD with the long axis across the long axis (i.e., vertical images aren’t displayed rotated). The D200 has an automatic rotation detector, however. You can activate this so that images are correctly rotated to the proper orientation by Nikon View and Nikon Capture. õ To turn on automatic image rotation: 1. Press the MENU key to show the menu system. 2. Use the Direction pad to navigate to the SET UP MENU (wrench icon tab). Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 395
  6. V1.03 3. Use the Direction pad to navigate to Auto Image Rotation and press the > key on the Direction to select it. 4. Use the Direction pad to navigate to On and press the > key to complete the setting. If you’ve set Auto Image Rotation to On, Nikon PictureProject and Nikon View also automatically rotate the images during transfer to your computer so that they’ll show up in the correct orientation in whatever software you use. However, even if Auto Image Rotation is set to On, that doesn’t mean the images show up rotated on the color LCD on the camera. For that you have to make a change in the PLAYBACK MENU settings: 1. Press the MENU key to show the menu system. 2. Use the Direction pad to navigate to the PLAYBACK MENU (wrench icon tab). Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 396
  7. V1.03 3. Use the Direction pad to navigate to Rotate Tall and press the > key on the Direction to select it. 4. Use the Direction pad to navigate to On and press the > key to complete the setting. Personally, I don’t like the Rotate Tall option, as it starts to make the review image too small to quickly evaluate. That’s especially true if you use the RGB Histogram page as your primary review page. I leave this option Off on my D200 and just tilt the camera or my head. The PLAYBACK Menu õ Pressing the Þ button and selecting the first tab (²) displays a selection of options on the color LCD: The % or " keys on the Direction pad are used to navigate between these options (the currently selected option is highlighted; sometimes that’s the tab, as in this case), and you press the < and > key on the Direction pad to select the Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 397
  8. V1.03 highlighted item. Note that some of the items can be done directly on the currently shown (or selected) image without using the menu system (e.g. Delete using the p button). The following sections detail each of the various PLAYBACK MENU options. Deleting Images õ You can delete the image that is shown on the color LCD (or the currently selected thumbnails) by pressing the p button on the back of the camera. Before actual deletion begins, you’ll be asked for confirmation, which you indicate by pressing the p button again (press any button on the back of the camera except for the p button to cancel deletion). õ Alternatively, you can use the Delete option on the PLAYBACK MENU, which can delete either a few images or all of them: 1. PLAYBACK -> Delete -> Selected 2. Images are displayed six at a time: Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 398
  9. V1.03 3. Center press of the Direction pad selects or deselects image(s) for deletion (you’ll see the p icon appear on it (see image 100-101, below). 4. ENTER button deletes the selected images. Selected As just outlined in the screen shots, above, the D200 displays a thumbnail view of the images, six at a time (Step 2, above). You navigate through them exactly as you would in thumbnail view (< and > key on the Direction pad), pressing the center position on the Direction pad on each image you want to erase (each press is a toggle, and a small trash can appears on any image scheduled for deletion—Step 3, above). You can also press the Thumbnail button to see a larger version of the currently selected image (useful when you have a sequence of very similar images and are trying to erase just one). You confirm the deletion of all the selected images by pressing the ENTER button, navigating to Yes, and pressing the ENTER button again when prompted (Step 4, above). Images marked with a protect symbol cannot be deleted; hidden images aren’t displayed. All The D200 immediately displays a confirmation prompt. Selecting Yes and confirming that by pressing ENTER immediately deletes all photographs on the card except for ones that have been marked as PROTECTED or Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 399
  10. V1.03 are HIDDEN. Nikon’s manual says that deleted images cannot be recovered. They can, but not easily, and only if you take immediate action. If you accidentally erase an image (or more) on a card, set that card aside until you can access it with your computer. Use an image recover utility program such as PhotoRescue ( http://www.datarescue.com/photorescue/) to recover the H deleted file before doing anything else with the card. This works because the act of deletion doesn’t actually remove the data for an image, it simply marks the space used by the file as available. Thus, if you write additional images to a card after deleting a file, you often can’t recover the deleted file, as the D200 has probably used the space for the new images. Dealing with Folders I’ve dealt with it earlier, but it’s worth repeating here as we go through the PLAYBACK menu options: the D200 uses folders to organize images stored on the CompactFlash card. Because the D200 follows the DCF digital camera standard (Design Rule for Camera File Systems) agreed to by most manufacturers, there are limitations on folder names and locations. If you do nothing (i.e. don’t use any of the options on the Playback Folder selection on the PLAYBACK menu, the D200 creates a root folder named DCIM, which in turn contains a folder named 100ND200. The first 999 images stored on the card are stored in that folder, then a new folder named 101ND201 is created and the next 999 images stored there. This process of creating new folders every 999 images continues until you fill the card. Thus, when you examine the structure of the CompactFlash card on your computer, you’ll see something like this: DCIM +----100ND200 +----101ND200 Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 400
  11. V1.03 etc. You can create new folders, but they always have a number as the first three characters and the D200 identifier as the last five (e.g. 102ND200), which isn’t particularly flexible. Once again, here’s the full extent of what you can do with folders on a D200: õ Create a new folder: 1. Press the MENU button to see the menus on the LCD. 2. Use the Direction pad to navigate to SHOOTING MENU (camera icon tab). 3. Use the Direction pad to navigate to Folders and press the > key on the Direction pad to select it. 4. Use the Direction pad to navigate to New and press the > key on the Direction pad to select it. 5. In the display that appears, use the % and " keys on the Direction pad to change the three digit portion of Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 401
  12. V1.03 the folder name: 6. Press the > key on the Direction pad to complete the creation. Note that your new folder becomes the Active Folder automatically! õ Select which folders to display in playback: 1. Press the MENU button to see the menus on the LCD. 2. Use the Direction pad to navigate to PLAYBACK MENU. 3. Use the Direction pad to navigate to Playback Folder and press the > key on the Direction pad to select it. 4. Use the Direction pad to navigate to the folder name you wish to use and press the > key on the Direction pad to select it. (Alternatively, you can also choose All or Current.) Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 402
  13. V1.03 Images are always stored in the currently selected folder (called the Active Folder and set by the Folders option on the Shooting menu). Folders cannot be renamed (curiously, they can be on the D50, D70 and Coolpix models). The D200 doesn’t allow you to delete folders. To actually get rid of a folder number, you’d have to first set your Folders value to a lower number, then delete the folder in question with your card in your card reader connected to the computer (or with the D200 connected to your computer). Folders are seriously confusing and restraining on the D200, at least if you start doing things that create new ones. I strongly advise against creating additional folders on the D200 (note that if you shoot more than 999 images on a card, you might have one created automatically by the camera). Not only will it create confusion when transferring images to your computer, but unless you’re disciplined about erasing folders and restoring your Active Folder value to the lowest number, you’ll start folder number creep, which can be annoying. Hiding Images The D200 allows you to “hide” images, which prevents them from displaying in PLAYBACK mode or in slide shows. When copied to a computer, hidden images are marked with both the hidden and read-only attributes, meaning that they don’t normally display in directories. õ To hide images: 1. Press the MENU button to see the menus on the color LCD. 2. Use the Direction pad to navigate to the PLAYBACK MENU. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 403
  14. V1.03 3. Use the Direction pad to navigate to Hide Image and use the > key on the Direction pad to select it. 4. Choose whether you want to hide/unhide individual images or unhide all previously hidden ones by navigating to the appropriate option with the Direction pad. 5. The D200 displays a thumbnail view of the images, six at a time. Navigate through them exactly as you would in thumbnail view (using the < and > key), pressing the center of the Direction pad on each image you want to hide (each press toggles between hide and unhide). 6. Confirm the hide action by pressing the ENTER button. Hidden images get a ¼ icon on them (e.g. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 404
  15. V1.03 image 100-97 in the following screen): Tip: On a Macintosh using OS 9.x, you’ll need a utility such as ResEdit in order to make a file visible again. In ResEdit, select Get File/Folder Info… from the File menu. Uncheck both the File Locked and Invisible boxes to remove the hidden attribute. In OS-X you get to the Locked file attribute by using Get Info (Apple-I) on the file (it’s in the General section, which is usually opened by default; click on the > next to it if it isn’t). The easiest way to restore hidden images is to use the Deselect All? option on the Hide image menu (see Step #4, above). Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 405
  16. V1.03 Custom Settings The good news is that many of the camera’s defaults can be overridden or modified. The bad news is that Nikon’s method of making these changes is slightly cumbersome. Having to scroll through 47 Custom Settings choices can be time-consuming (even with the groupings that the D200 menu system uses), especially for those of us who use multiple Nikon bodies. Why? Because Nikon keeps changing the Custom Settings number for functions that are identical across the bodies. For example, the self-timer function is #16 on the F100, F5 and D1s, but it’s #C4 on the D2 series and D200. Fortunately for D2 series users, the D200 Custom Settings only have a few numbering differences, but if you’re coming from a D50, D70, or D100, you’ll find many. Fortunately, the D200 allows up to four “banks” of Custom Settings. If there is a group of settings you use regularly, you should create them in one of the banks and name that bank so that you can remember it. Since the banks are the first item in the Custom Setting menu, if you have them set up well you can reconfigure the camera very quickly. Generally, I leave one of the banks set to the camera defaults (well, my version of the camera defaults—as you’ll learn, there are a couple of places where I strongly suggest a different setting than the default). I use a second bank for on- demand changes. That leaves me two banks for specialized shooting constraints. In one of these banks, I make settings that are useful when I’m heavily using flash (Func Button, Modeling flash, etc.), in the second I optimize the camera for very active sports shooting (my preferred Group Dynamic AF and other autofocus settings, mostly). Just to be clear here: when I want the camera at its defaults, I use Bank A (which I usually name Defaults!). When I’m shooting normally and making Custom Setting changes as demand warrants, I’m in Bank B (named Thom Norm). When I’m in the studio using flash, I use Bank C (named Thom Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 406
  17. V1.03 Flash). Finally, when I’m shooting action, I use Bank D (named Thom Action). To use banks efficiently: 1. Figure out what groups of Custom Settings you use regularly together. This is an important step. Banks need to be assigned to groups of settings that you know you’ll always be using together, otherwise you simply end up making individual changes to Custom Settings in every bank, violating the whole concept. In other words, creating banks of settings generally isn’t something you do the first day. But after a few weeks, if you’ve been paying attention, you should be able to recognize camera setups you use regularly. Good; you’re ready to create banks of Custom Settings. 2. Pick a bank. As I wrote earlier, I generally leave Bank A alone, giving me one bank that I know I can return to, fiddle with, and reset at will. 3. Bring up the Custom Settings menu. Use the Direction pad to navigate to the CUSTOM SETTING MENU using the Direction pad and press the > key to get to the options. 4. Start Bank Selection. Use the Direction pad to navigate to Bank Select and press the > key to see the options. 5. Select a bank. Use the Direction pad to navigate to the bank you wish to modify, and press the > key to Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 407
  18. V1.03 complete the selection. 6. Make your Custom Settings. Any Custom Settings you make are applied to the currently selected bank, which you set in Step 5. Take your time. Make sure you run through all the Custom Settings and set each one, as necessary. 7. Finish up. Use the Direction pad to navigate to Bank select and press the > key to see the options. 8. Name your Bank. Use the Direction pad to navigate to Rename and press the > key. a. Use the Direction pad to navigate to the bank you want to name and press the > key. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 408
  19. V1.03 b. In the screen that appears: i. Use the Direction pad to navigate to a letter to enter. ii. Use the Delete button to delete the currently highlighted letter. iii. Press the center of the Direction pad to enter the currently selected letter. iv. Use the Thumbnail + Direction pad keys to move the cursor within your entry. v. Press the ENTER button to complete your entry. Yes, with 45 possible settings in each of four banks, this could take you a while to do. Another option is to use Nikon Capture Camera Control to make the settings with your camera connected to your computer. This is the way I usually do it, as it goes a little faster. õ All custom settings are made by: 1. Pressing the MENU button to bring up the menus on the color LCD. 2. Using the Direction pad to navigate to the CUSTOM SETTING MENU (the purple pencil icon) and press the > key to select it. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 409
  20. V1.03 3. Using the Direction pad to navigate to the group (a, b, c, d, e, or f) in which the custom setting you wish to change is located and press the > key to select it. 4. Using the Direction pad to navigate to an option and to make your selections. Note: If an asterisk (*) appears prior to the Custom Setting number, that function has been set to something other than the default value. There are 45 individual Custom Settings (plus the Bank Select and Menu Reset options), and the values and terminology used for each are sometimes obvious, sometimes cryptic, so follow along closely. I’ll provide a complete description of each option, along with my recommendations for each. Note: In the sections that follow, my name for the custom setting is given first, the name displayed on the D200 in parentheses. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 410
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