Complete Guide to the Nikon D200- P15

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Complete Guide to the Nikon D200- P15

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Complete Guide to the Nikon D200- P15:As with all my books, a full draft was reviewed by volunteers to weed out unclear language and misstatements. This book is better because of them.

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  1. V1.03 Recommendations: 1. If you use other Nikon bodies, especially ones that don’t allow you to override this function, consider leaving this setting at its default for consistency. 2. I think that it’s much more likely that you’d want to change the default on this option than it is on Custom Setting #A1. Why? Because Single Servo AF doesn’t pick up on subjects that start to move after the focus sequence has initiated. The focus locks before the shutter opens so if the subject starts to move after the focus lock, your focus won’t be correct. This subtle difference means that with the default setting for #A2 you will get more out-of-focus shots with subjects that start and stop motion. By setting Release, you’re relying upon the focus system to get a good read on where focus should be initially and move the lens as the mirror and shutter get out of the way. To that end, I’d also suggest that you only set Release if you’ve got a fast (f/2.8 or faster) lens and one with AF-S (internal lens motor). Slower AF lenses with no internal motor are much less likely to get to the right focus point by the time the shutter is open. Custom Setting #A3 Focus Area Size (Focus Area Frame) Unique to the D200 is the ability to set the framing area (size of the detection area) of the autofocus sensors. As I noted several times earlier in this work, the underlying part that contains the autofocus sensors actually has seven physical sensing areas to it. Two of those areas can be subdivided into three, which results in as many as eleven distinct focusing areas. Moreover, the non-subdivided areas appear to be used slightly differently depending upon how you set this function. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 421
  2. V1.03 Normal Frame Eleven sensing areas used [default] Wide Frame Seven sensing areas used Recommendations: 1. This is an option that’s going to take us all time to fully understand the benefits of. But one important thing to notice is how the camera displays the AF sensing area. In Wide Frame, the top and bottom sensor indicators, for example, are shown as distinctly wider, and they are. But what does that mean? Well, in Wide Frame there’s a bit of Closest Subject Priority going on (similar to the Group AF with Closest Subject Priority options). The wider sensor pattern is big enough so that it is often on both a near and far subject simultaneously. In these cases, the closest subject appears to be used. For example, if the left-hand portion of the top sensor is on something at 10 feet and the right-hand portion of the top sensor is on something at 20 feet, the camera focuses at 10 feet. In Normal Frame, the sensing areas are small enough that they normally only obtain focus on one thing (you’d need a really wide lens and lots of tight detail at different distances for them to react the same way as Wide Frame, something that just doesn’t occur in nature). 2. This is a subject-motivated setting. For example, while shooting flying birds, I actually preferred Wide Frame, because the wider sensing areas almost always got enough of the bird to get the right focus, while Normal Frame sometimes was small enough to miss part of the bird (think about the wing flapping in and out of a sensor area, for example). For some sports, the opposite is true. For example, trying to follow distant soccer players the closest subject tendency of Wide Frame, especially on Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 422
  3. V1.03 the two vertical sensors just to the sides of center, would sometimes decide the grass was more important than an off-center subject. 3. Think of Wide Frame being a smaller #A4 Pattern 2 Closest Subject Priority option. Try it. Set the camera to both these options and then flip the selector switch on the back of the camera between Group and Dynamic Area AF. Note how Wide Frame is covering a similar area to what you set for #A4, but always smaller, no matter what the sensor you’ve picked. So. If #A4 Pattern 2 appeals to you, Wide Frame gives you another variant of that. Indeed, if you’ve set #A4 to Pattern 2 Closest Subject Priority, I’d suggest you set Wide Frame, as well. That way you can use the selector switch on the back of the camera to further fine tune your pattern. Custom Setting #A4 Group Autofocus Pattern (Pattern Selection in Group Dynamic AF) When you set Group Dynamic autofocus on the D200, a grouped pattern of sensors is used to obtain focus information. Which sensor in that pattern that is used for focus can also be selected. You choose the pattern of sensors used, and which of the pattern has preference, with this option: Pattern 1 Closest Subject Uses closest sensor from a diamond pattern Center Area Uses center sensor from a diamond pattern [default] Pattern 2 Closest Subject Uses closest sensor from a line-like pattern Center Area Uses center sensor from a line-like pattern Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 423
  4. V1.03 Unfortunately, the patterns are labeled ambiguously (1 and 2), making them difficult to remember. I like to think of them as “diamonds” and “lines,” though that’s not a perfect description (think of the top and bottom diamonds as having been “cut off” and the left and right lines as being “augmented”): Pattern 1 Pattern 2 (Diamonds) (Lines) Top Center Bottom Left Right Note that these patterns are the same for both Wide and Narrow area autofocus (Custom Setting #A3). When you pick the Group AF setting on the camera, you’re overriding the individual sensor selection and asking for groups, so Custom Setting #A3 no longer applies. Whether the line pattern for the central position is vertical or horizontal for Pattern 2 is controlled by pressing the center of the Direction pad. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 424
  5. V1.03 Recommendations: 1. Initially, I was attracted to Pattern 1, the diamonds. Remember, within a pattern, the camera may be using Closest Subject Priority (CSP), so the sensor that’s on the closest thing to the camera is the one used for focusing in that case. When you use the diamond pattern, you’re basically selecting the top, center, bottom, left, and right area to be used for focus (if you chose Closest Subject) or the central sensor of that group (if you chose Center Area). In general, I find either works well for many action and sports subjects where there isn’t a distracting foreground. But Closest Subject doesn’t necessarily work for all framings and for all sports. Consider for example, soccer. If you were following a soccer player and not able to frame him or her tight enough, the sensor that would be used for focus would almost always be the bottom one of the diamond, which is almost certainly going to be looking at grass in front of the player. What I’ve found is that I love the diamond pattern for occasions when I’m pretty tightly framed on a subject (e.g. cropping the legs and shooting a subject from the waist up). I’ve even found a way to use it for quick and dirty hyperfocal focus when shooting landscapes with certain lenses and certain framings. But over time, I’ve started using this pattern less and less. 2. More recently, I’ve become enamored of Pattern 2, lines. This is especially true for sports shooting where I can’t always control the “tightness” of framing due to my position on the field and the lens being used. I don’t like the left and right vertical line patterns as much (not sure what Nikon was thinking here), but I find that in my soccer example, the top and center horizontal line groups usually allow me to get focus perfect every time. The vertical lines (left, center with Direction pad press, and right) are useful when shooting shots indoors at receptions and other occasions where you may have people standing in loose groups and you want to control who’s in focus. In short, the more thought I give to these two options, the Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 425
  6. V1.03 more I find interesting variants that make them usable for me. 3. F5 users who’ve taken the advice in my F5 eBook or that which appears on Moose Petersen’s Web site about deactivating two of the autofocus sensors to get better performance, will want to choose Pattern 2 and use the horizontal central pattern for the sake of consistency with their previous experience. 4. You pick two things: the pattern (recommendations above) and sensor priority (Closest Subject or Center Area). The difference between these two is actually more complex than at first it may seem. Closest Subject always has the camera choosing which sensor is used. As such, it can sometimes slow the camera down in low contrast situations as the camera tries to figure out where the closest subject is. But note Center Area doesn’t mean that the central area will always be used for focus; it means that focus always starts with what’s happening on the central sensor of the group. Focus will shift if the camera thinks the subject it detected in the central sensor has shifted in position to another sensor. Personally, I like Center Area better than Closest Subject, as it gives me a little more control and keeps the performance of the camera at maximum. Custom Setting #A5 Disable Focus Lock-On (Focus Tracking with Lock-On) Nikon bodies have long had a feature called Focus Lock-on. This function tells the focus system to ignore a sudden and temporary large change in focus, as happens, for example, if someone runs in front of your subject. Sports photographers sometimes don’t always want that behavior, so Nikon added the ability to tune it: Long Change has to occur for a long time to trigger AF shift Normal Nikon’s default pause before shifting AF [default] Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 426
  7. V1.03 Short AF shifts even on short changes Off Focus Lock-On is deactivated Recommendations: 1. This is an action-specific setting; some sports and activities you’ll want Lock-On active, others you won’t. If you’ve been getting photos where the action in the background is in focus but something that is happening near is out of focus, this new setting may be the solution (though check to make sure it isn’t simply a sensor selection issue first). 2. Note that Off is the equivalent to “infinitely short.” Essentially, Nikon has given you four timing settings: infinitely short, short, medium, and long. If focus is shifting when you don’t want it to, pick a longer setting. If focus isn’t shifting when you want it to, pick a shorter setting. 3. Changes to the autofocus algorithms have made it more likely that you’ll want to use a shorter setting than Normal, at least in any Continuous frame advance method. Depending upon your other autofocus settings, a large jump in focus distance between shots sometimes throws the camera off unless you shorten this setting. So, if you’re shooting in either Continuous frame advance mode, consider not using the default for this function. I say “consider” because I’ve experienced mixed results. Sometimes I want it short, sometimes longer, but the results don’t seem to be perfectly predictable. In general, however, shorter seems better to me when shooting continuously. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 427
  8. V1.03 Custom Setting #A6 Initiating Autofocus (AF Activation) Nikon bodies have long had a number of flexible and useful autofocus customizations, and this function is one of the classics. The default behavior of most autofocus cameras is that autofocus begins when the shutter release is pressed partway. That’s the default on the D200, as well, although you can also initiate autofocus by pressing the AF-ON button. However, you can use this Custom Setting to remove autofocus initiation from the shutter release press: Shutter/AF-ON Shutter release triggers focus [default] AF-ON Only Only AF-ON button triggers focus Recommendations: 1. One way to think about this function is that it is a sneaky way to lock focus. Let’s say that you’re shooting a baseball game and are anticipating some action at second base. With AF-ON Only set you’d point your camera at second base, press the AF-ON button to establish focus, then wait for the action. When it does happen, the camera won’t refocus due to the shutter release press (as it would with the camera default in place). There are two useful aspects here: (a) if you established the focus well in the first place, no player hitting one of the autofocus sensors is going to reset it to someplace you might not want it (if you’ve ever had a pitcher intrude into the near part of the frame and catch one of the outer AF sensors, you’ll know what I mean); and (b) you remove a teeny bit of lag out of the shutter release to picture time, helping you catch the exact moment of action. 2. If you’re one of those focus-and-set-exposure-then-reframe types of shooters, AF-ON Only helps you isolate these Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 428
  9. V1.03 actions in a way that you might find useful: (a) point the camera at the thing you want in focus and press AF-ON; (b) point the camera at that which you want to meter, press and hold the AE-L/AF-L button (you might want to explore Custom Setting #C2 for options here); and (c) reframe and press the shutter release. Custom Setting #A7 Focus Area Illumination (AF Area Illumination) The focus area indicators in the viewfinder normally light up briefly in red to indicate which one (or ones) is being used to initiate focus. This particular option causes a great deal of confusion amongst users, as the Nikon manual is a bit scattered about how the lighted sensors work and Nikon falls into the trap of name overlap. But before I get into that, let’s look at the options: Auto Sensors only use brief red highlight when necessary to distinguish due to scene brightness [default] On Sensors always light briefly in red to show which one will be used for focus information [default] Off Sensors never light in red Recommendations: 1. Personally, I like the default. In dim light I get the brief red boost to help find the selected sensor, in bright light the black outline is good enough. 2. You’re probably wondering why you might want to turn this off. One word: power. If you set On, you’ll be using a Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 429
  10. V1.03 tiny bit more power every time you move autofocus around. The default is a good balance between power consumption and visibility, but if you’re a power miser, select Off. Custom Setting #A8 Focus Area Selection Wrap (Focus Area Selection) The Direction pad on the back of the camera is used to select which autofocus area to use. You can change the behavior of repeatedly pressing the Direction pad: No Wrap Repeated presses stop sensor selection at edge of display [default] Wrap Repeated presses wrap selection around to the opposite side of the display (but continue in the same direction). Recommendation: 1. I like the wrap-around effect, but you’ll need to try both options to figure out which you like better. Custom Setting #A9 Autofocus Assist Illumination (Built-in AF- Assist Illumination) The D200’s Autofocus Assist lamp is controlled by this function: On In poor lighting, the Autofocus Assist light on the camera illuminates [default] Off The camera’s Autofocus Assist light never illuminates Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 430
  11. V1.03 Recommendation: 1. Turn it Off, if possible. The light on the camera is annoying and poorly located (lens hoods and fingers tend to block it, rendering it ineffective). Instead, mount an external i-TTL flash and activate its Autofocus Assist lighting. Both the SB-600 and SB-800 have much wider patterns of lighting, and because it’s a dim red, it’s not intrusive. Custom Setting #A10 MB-D200 AF-ON Button Options (AF-ON Button for MB-D200 Battery Pack) Because the optional MB-D200 vertical grip hand position puts the Direction pad and AE-L/AF-L buttons too far away to reach easily, Nikon has wisely chosen to allow you to specify what the handy AF-ON button on the MB-D200 does. AF-ON+ Besides the same AF-ON button function as Focus Area the camera’s AF-ON button, you can also hold the MB-D200’s button down and use the Front Command dial to change the focus area [default] AF-ON Pressing the MB-D200’s AF-ON button performs the same function as the camera’s AF-ON button AE/AF-L+ Pressing the AF-ON button on the MB-D200 Focus Area performs the same function as the camera’s AE-L/AF-L button (see CSM #C2), plus the focus area can be changed by holding the button and turning the Front Command dial Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 431
  12. V1.03 AE/AF-L Pressing the AF-ON button on the MB-D200 Focus Area performs the same function as the camera’s AE-L/AF-L button (see CSM #C2) Focus Area Neither focus nor exposure are affected by button press; but holding the AF-ON button on the MB-D200 and turning the Front Command dial changes the autofocus sensor used Same as FUNC Button Pressing the AF-ON button on the MB-D200 performs the same function as the camera’s FUNC button (see CSM #F4). Recommendations: 1. You’ll note that there are four things you can control with the AF-ON button: AF-ON button function, AE-L/AF-L button function, FUNC button function, and focus area selection. You’re given the option of the most logical couplings, plus the ability to have the button control only one thing. Thus, the first thing you should think about is whether you want the button to do one or two things. Personally, I think that AF-ON+Focus Area and AE/AF- L+Focus Area are the most logical choices for most shooters, as you really need a convenient way to choose autofocus sensors with the vertical grip, plus you want the button to do something else. 2. I leave my camera set at the default. Why? Because I don’t necessarily like having two buttons labeled AF-ON that do different things (this function only changes the button on the vertical release). Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 432
  13. V1.03 Custom Setting #B1 Automatic ISO Setting (ISO Sensitivity Auto Control) Normally, the D200 uses specific ISO values you set (see “ISO Sensitivity” on page < 247>). But you can set the camera H to automatically boost ISO values (up to 1600) in low light situations. Nikon says “when optimal exposure cannot be achieved at the sensitivity selected by the user,” which doesn’t give you much indication of when the camera changes values. Fortunately, Nikon made a change from the D100 where this function was originally implemented: the D200 displays an ISO AUTO indicator in both the back LCD and viewfinder, and this indicator is lit constantly when you’ve enabled AUTO ISO. The D200 also shows the actual (adjusted) ISO value in both the viewfinder and on the top LCD and blinks ISO AUTO to tell you when it’s been changed. However this change in displayed value doesn’t occur until the metering is active. The trigger that causes an ISO adjustment varies depending upon what exposure mode you’re in: • In Shutter-priority exposure mode, the camera begins boosting the ISO when the shutter speed you select requires an aperture faster than the maximum aperture on the lens. The ISO AUTO in the viewfinder and on the top LCD begins blinking to warn you that the camera is changing ISO and the ISO value changes. • In Manual exposure mode the camera boosts the ISO and keeps the exposure bar centered if the light (exposure) changes (in other words, it honors you aperture and shutter speed selection first and foremost). The ISO AUTO in the viewfinder and on the top LCD begin blinking to warn you that the camera is changing ISO and the ISO value itself changes. (Note that you can still overexpose or underexpose an image in this situation—the camera doesn’t have any ISO values below the base 100 and it won’t go beyond 1600, either.) Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 433
  14. V1.03 • In Aperture-priority and Program exposure modes, the camera boosts the ISO only when you hit a shutter speed of 1/30 second (the default; you can also change this value in this function). The ISO AUTO in the viewfinder and on the back LCD begins blinking to warn you that the camera is changing ISO, and the ISO value itself changes. Several other aspects of this function to watch out for: • If the ISO value appears in red on the information pages for a photo after you’ve taken a shot, this indicates that the camera altered the ISO from what you set. • The ISO value displayed in the menu system is the ISO value you set, not the one that the camera may be setting. The ISO value shown on the top LCD and in the viewfinder may not agree with the one in the menu system once automatic adjustment occurs. • If the flash is active (either internal or external) the camera does not alter the ISO value. This has consequences on your ambient exposure (if you don’t know what I mean by that, read the flash section and come back). • The ISO value is adjusted in 1/6 stop increments using this function, not 1/3 stop increments. • The camera will not set the H0.3 through H1.0 ISO values. Off ISO values are those you specifically set and are not automatically altered by the camera [default] On Under certain circumstances, and if the flash is not active, the camera boosts ISO values in low light Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 434
  15. V1.03 This function also allows you to set two additional parameters: Max. Sensitivity The highest ISO value the camera will automatically set [default] Min. Shutter Speed The lowest shutter speed for Program and Aperture-priority exposure modes that will be honored before the ISO value is automatically adjusted Recommendations: 1. Avoid it. You have to pay close attention to when it kicks in, and the caveats—such as flash turning it off—are often enough to get you the wrong results. On a D200, noise levels definitely increase significantly at higher ISO values, while long shutter speeds don’t generate much additional noise (especially if Long Exp. NR is On). So it’s a no-brainer when you’re shooting from a stable platform with non-moving subjects to simply use a low ISO value and longer shutter speed. In non-flash situations where a minimum shutter speed is absolutely needed (e.g. indoor basketball), the D200 still Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 435
  16. V1.03 doesn’t get flying colors with the Auto ISO option: the upper limit of 1600 on the ISO puts a damper on things (in the gym I shoot in, I definitely need to sometimes hit ISO 3200 to keep the shutter speed at 1/500). Essentially, Auto ISO is merely a four-stop adjustment trying to live in a world where five and six stop adjustments are commonly needed. But, as long as you watch that ISO value in the viewfinder and are comfortable with what the camera is doing, then my previous total objection to this function (on previous Nikon DSLRs) should be considered lifted. 2. If you do use Automatic ISO setting, immediately cancel it after each use. Generally, you want to be in control of the camera, not have it be in control of you. 3. Likewise, set the Max. Sensitivity and Min. Shutter Speed, if possible, to keep the automatic ISO adjustment from kicking in too early or doing too much change. For example, as I noted in the ISO Sensitivity section on page < 247>, I’m comfortable with the noise levels of the D200 H up through ISO 400, so setting a Max. Sensitivity of 400 and leaving this function On is something some people should consider (personally, I always opt for lower noise, when possible). Likewise, I usually can handhold down to 1/15, especially with the VR on the 18-200mm lens, so I often set that as my Min. Shutter Speed before the ISO adjustment kicks in. Note: There is a hitch with this Custom Setting. If you try to set #B1 to On in a Shooting Bank where ISO H0.3, H0.7, or H1.0 is already set, automatic ISO adjustment does not occur. Likewise, if you go to the SHOOTING MENU and change the ISO value to one of those three values, automatic ISO adjustment is cancelled, even if set to On. Custom Setting #B2 ISO Increment (ISO Sensitivity Step Value) ISO values that the D200 sets can be chosen in three different increments. The increment chosen with this setting is used for all ISO settings in the camera, excluding Auto ISO: Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 436
  17. V1.03 1/3 step 1/3 stop increments [default] 1/2 step 1/2 stop increments 1 step full stop increments Recommendation: 1. I’m not sure that this option is all that useful, actually. Basically, you’re giving yourself a shorter list of choices in the menu system while setting ISO. Custom Setting #B3 Exposure Control Increment (EV Steps for Exposure Control) Exposure settings (apertures, shutter speeds, and bracketing, but not exposure compensation) that the D200 uses can be set in three different increments. The increment chosen with this setting is used for all exposure settings in the camera: 1/3 step 1/3 stop increments [default] 1/2 step 1/2 stop increments 1 step full stop increments Recommendations: 1. It really doesn’t make much sense to set the alternative values unless you are simultaneously shooting with Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 437
  18. V1.03 another camera body that doesn’t support 1/3-stop increments (i.e. you want exposure settings to match between both cameras). If you set 1/2-stop increments, for instance, you could find yourself in situations where you’re underexposing more than necessary to preserve highlight detail. Generally you want to set your brightest point as close to the top end of the D200’s range as possible, and 1/3-stop increments allow you to get closer 111 to the top end than 1/2 stop increments . F 2. Note that this only controls the apertures, shutter speeds, and bracketing steps that can be set. Exposure compensation settings are set by Custom Setting #B4 and can have a different increment than this option. My suggestion: make them match! Custom Setting #B4 Exposure Compensation Increment (Steps for Exposure Comp and Fine Tuning) Exposure compensation that the D200 uses can be set in three different increments. The increment chosen with this setting is used for all exposure settings in the camera: 1/3 step 1/3 stop increments [default] 1/2 step 1/2 stop increments 1 step full stop increments Recommendations: 1. It really doesn’t make much sense to set the alternative values unless you are simultaneously shooting with 111 Technically, we’re talking about a 1/6 stop difference. But every little bit helps. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 438
  19. V1.03 another camera body that doesn’t support 1/3-stop increments (i.e. you want exposure settings to match between both cameras). If you set 1/2-stop increments, for instance, you could find yourself in situations where you’re underexposing more than necessary to preserve highlight detail. Generally you want to set your brightest point as close to the top end of the D200’s range as possible, and 1/3-stop increments allow you to get closer 112 to the top end than 1/2 stop increments . F 2. Note that this only controls the increment for exposure compensation that can be set. Aperture, shutter speed, and bracketing increment settings are set by Custom Setting #B3 and can have a different increment than this option. My suggestion: make them match! Custom Setting #B5 Exposure Compensation Control (Easy Exposure Compensation) Some users think that pressing a button and turning a dial to set exposure compensation is less convenient than other possibilities. Again, Nikon allows you to change the behavior of the D200: Off Exposure compensation requires holding in the £ button [default] On Exposure compensation is set by rotating a Command dial without pressing the £ button. Which Command dial is used depends upon the exposure mode and whether you’ve switched the Command dials using Custom Setting #F5: CSM #F5 Exp Mode Exposure Compensation set by OFF A Rear Command dial OFF S, P Front Command dial OFF M Exposure Comp not allowed ON A Front Command dial ON S, P Rear Command dial ON M Exposure Comp not allowed 112 Technically, we’re talking about a 1/6 stop difference. But every little bit helps. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 439
  20. V1.03 Recommendations: 1. Any Custom Setting that requires a table (see above) to understand the nuances of what each control does is, by my definition, confusing and to be avoided. Especially when the behavior changed is a default one on every Nikon body built to date (which makes changing between bodies problematic, especially if the other body doesn’t have a custom setting to make this setting!). However, some D200 users only have one camera and always use their camera in one exposure mode (usually aperture- preferred), and thus find this custom setting useful. Your choice. But know what you’re doing. 2. If you’ve used Nikon 35mm film bodies for any amount of time, the £ button is right where you expect it and works just as you’d expect. I never fiddle with this setting, as not all Nikons allow this Custom Setting. I prefer to have all my bodies work identically. Moreover, hold-button-and- twirl-dial is the basic tenet of Nikon’s UI. Violate it at your own risk. Custom Setting #B6 Center-weight Circle Size (Center-Weighted Area) The center-weighted metering can be adjusted: you can choose the size of the inner circle that produces 75% of the meter weighting. The default is 8mm, which is the size of the circle shown in the viewfinder. Your choices are: 6mm 6mm circle for 75% 8mm 8mm circle for 75% [default] 10mm 10mm circle for 75% Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 440
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