Complete Guide to the Nikon D200- P18

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Complete Guide to the Nikon D200- P18

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Complete Guide to the Nikon D200- P18:As with all my books, a full draft was reviewed by volunteers to weed out unclear language and misstatements. This book is better because of them.

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  1. V1.03 our repeats value (Step 1e in the above; as you can see from the steps in setting procedure, Nikon got things backwards—we’d really want to perform Step 1f first, not Step 1e). 2. Activate the flash by popping it up (press the Flash Release button). 3. Set the camera to Single Servo AF; flash only operates when the camera achieves focus; this step isn’t technically required, but I like to tell people to use it as a reminder that focus has to be achieved for flash to operate). 4. Focus on your subject by pressing lightly on the shutter release. Note the distance on the scale on the lens. 5. Select an exposure mode. Typically Shutter priority or Manual exposure modes work best, as we’re constrained by shutter speed due to our calculations in Step 1. 6. Set your shutter speed to the one you used in calculating the repeating flash effect (Step 1). 7. Set your aperture based upon calculating Aperture = GN / Distance. Determine the GN by looking at the tables in the Manual flash section, above. You know the distance from Step 4. If the aperture you calculate here can’t be obtained, you’ll need to go back and reset the manual flash power (Step 1d). If you can set the calculated aperture on your lens, do so and you’re ready to shoot. Wireless Flash The big trick in the D200 internal flash arsenal is its ability to completely control a multiple wireless flash setup. Specifically, the D200’s internal flash is a “Commander” and the other external flashes are “Remotes.” The way this works is that the Commander (internal flash) sends queries and instructions to each set of Remotes Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 511
  2. V1.03 (external flashes) by using special preflash sequences. Only i-TTL capable flashes can be used for wireless work, which means SB-600, SB-800, or SB-R200 flashes must be used for Remotes. For the wireless flash system to work, the remote flash units need to be able to see the light output of the D200’s internal flash, and the D200 needs to be able to see the light output of the remote flashes. You’re probably wondering about these preflash queries and instructions. Let’s say I have the full set of two Remotes in addition to my D200 internal flash (Commander). The preflash sequence that occurs when you press the shutter release now looks something like this: Commander: Remote Group A fire a preflash Remote Group A: Preflash fires Commander: Remote Group B fire a preflash Remote Group B: Preflash fires Commander: I’m firing a preflash Commander: Preflash fires [Camera calculates exposure] Commander: Remote Group A should fire at Level X Commander: Remote Group B should fire at Level Y [Camera mirror moves up, shutter opens] Commander: Fire! All flashes: All flashes fire at calculated levels Believe it or not, it’s a lot more complex than that simplification. All the Flash Options, like Rear Sync, still come into play, which means that the Commander has to do a lot more instructing than just ask for a preflash and a TTL fire level. Incredibly, all this communicating happens very quickly. If you’re not watching specifically for it, you can’t see the sequence of communication. On the other hand, you will almost surely note that there is more lag in the shutter release Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 512
  3. V1.03 and that the preflash sequence seems longer. It is, and that 129 can trigger fast blinkers . F Since the actual communicating is done via the near IR energy in the light each flash produces, there are limitations on both the distance and the environment where wireless flash will work. Outdoors has more ambient near IR and fewer reflections, so distance is usually restricted and there usually has to be direct line-of-sight between camera and remote flash units. Because of bounces off walls and ceilings, wireless flash is a bit more flexible indoors—you sometimes can hide a remote flash out of line-of-site of the camera because its light reflects well enough for the camera to still see. The jargon starts to get a little confusing, as Nikon uses different names at different places in its documentation. For example, Commander mode and Master flash get a little confusing if you read multiple Nikon manuals. I’ll try to stay a little more consistent. The D200 can control up to two groups of Remotes. Indeed, Nikon uses the label Groups instead of the Remotes name that I’ve been using. Each remote group can have multiple flashes in it, though Nikon doesn’t recommend more than three flashes in a remote group, and I don’t recommend that you use multiple flashes in a remote group unless they’re all trying to light the same thing and you need more power than a single flash would provide. That’s because the more flashes you set up, the more likely it becomes that one isn’t seen in the preflash sequence. But for a three-flash setup (the camera’s internal plus two remotes), the D200’s wireless abilities are excellent, and all that you need. (If you need more than two Remotes, you need 129 The solution for that is the same as I’ll outline a little later in this section for SU-4 type wireless: use FV Lock. FV Lock removes the preflash sequence from the shutter release, moving it instead to the FUNC button. Thus, you set flash exposure by pressing FUNC. Then you wait to press the shutter release for the right moment of action (or inaction, depending upon your subject ;~). You only have to press FUNC and do another preflash sequence if lighting conditions change. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 513
  4. V1.03 to substitute an SU-800 or SB-800 on the D200 as the Commander instead of the internal flash. But that’s a subject for another book…) Here’s how to set up a three flash wireless shoot (I’ll use one SB-600 and one SB-800 as the Remotes so that we step through the remote setup for each; you could instead have two of either or even SB-R200’s): 1. Use CSM #E3 to set Commander Mode. a. Press the MENU button to show the menu system. b. Use the Direction pad to navigate to the Custom Settings tab. Press the > key to enter the Custom Settings menu. c. Use the Direction pad to navigate to Custom Setting #E3. Press the > key to enter the Flash Mode setting. d. Use the Direction pad to navigate to Commander Mode. Press the > key to enter the Commander Mode settings. e. You must set two things for each participating flash: the flash mode it’ll use (Mode) and the Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 514
  5. V1.03 flash output level (Comp. 130). You navigate to F fill-in-boxes with the < and > keys on the Direction pad; you set value in the boxes with the " and % keys on the Direction pad. i. For each flash (internal, Group A, Group B), set the flash mode. You can set TTL, AA (not for internal flash), M, or --. The last item, --, means that this flash or Group will not participate in the exposure. ii. For each flash (internal, Group A, Group B), set the flash exposure compensation (for TTL) or power output level (for Manual flash). f. Finally, use the > key to navigate to Channel and then use the keys to set one of the four channels that the preflash sequence uses. 2. Let’s move on to our first remote flash, which for illustration purposes will be an SB-800. a. Press the SEL button on the SB-800 for more than two seconds to get to the Custom Settings for the flash. 130 I guess Comp. is supposed to stand for “compensation.” But that’s not quite accurate. If a flash is set to TTL, Comp. sets flash exposure compensation for that flash. If a flash is instead set to M (Manual), Comp. sets the power level (1/1 = full, 1/2 = half, etc.) for that flash. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 515
  6. V1.03 b. Use the " and % keys on the SB-800 Direction pad to highlight the wireless flash icon. c. Press the SEL button to get to the options for wireless flash. d. Use the " and % keys on the SB-800 Direction pad to highlight REMOTE. e. Hold the SEL button down for two seconds to leave Custom Settings on the flash. The SB-800 should now be set for remote use: To set the Channel, press the SEL button 131 f. F until CH is highlighted (inverted white letters on black), then use the " and % keys on the SB-800 Direction pad until the channel number you set in Step 1f is highlighted. g. To set the Group, press the SEL button until GROUP is highlighted (inverted white letters on black), then use the " and % keys on the 131 I’m specific in word use. This is not the “hold down” that you used to get to the Custom Settings for the flash. Instead, when I say press, I mean a quick jab of the button. It may take multiple jabs to get to the right item, which is why I say “press…until.” Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 516
  7. V1.03 SB-800 Direction pad until the first Group letter you set in Step 1eii is highlighted. h. Orient the SB-800 so that its infrared receiver is looking towards the D200’s internal flash (note that you can rotate the flash head to fix the orientation, if necessary). 3. Now to our final flash, this time an SB-600: a. Simultaneously hold down the Zoom and - buttons on the SB-600 for more than two seconds to get to the Custom Settings for the flash. b. Use the " and % keys on the SB-600 Direction pad to highlight the wireless flash icon. c. Press the Zoom button until 0N shows above the wireless icon. d. Press the On/Off button briefly to leave Custom Settings. The SB-600 should be set for remote use: e. To set the Channel, press the SB-600 Mode 132 F button until the number above CH is blinking, then use the " and % keys on the SB-600 132 I’m specific in word use. This is not the “hold down” that you used to get to the Custom Settings for the flash. Instead, when I say press, I mean a quick jab of the button. It may take multiple jabs to get to the right item, which is why I say “press…until.” Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 517
  8. V1.03 Direction pad until the channel number you set in Step 1f is highlighted. f. To set the Group, press the SB-600 Mode button again until the number above GROUP is blinking, then use the " and % keys on the SB-600 Direction pad until the first Group letter you set in Step 1eii is highlighted. g. Orient the SB-600 so that its infrared receiver is looking towards the D200’s internal flash (note that you can rotate the flash head to fix the orientation, if necessary). 4. Activate the internal flash on the D200 by popping it up. (Press the Flash Release button.) 5. Set the camera to Single Servo AF; this step isn’t technically required, but I like to tell people to use it as a reminder that focus has to be achieved for flash to operate. 6. Set the camera’s exposure mode, if you haven’t already. In Aperture-priority (A), Shutter-priority (S), and Manual (M) exposure modes, make any necessary aperture or shutter speed selections. Note: In Program exposure mode you can usually override the camera’s selection of aperture and shutter speed combinations by turning the camera’s Rear Command dial (when the camera is active). But note that the maximum aperture you can use is restricted in Program exposure mode (the actual value depends upon ISO setting; see “Allowable Apertures in Program Mode” on page < 485>. H You’re ready to shoot. Nikon includes a drawing showing where remote flashes need to be positioned relative to the D200. I’ve actually found their suggestions to be relatively conservative, especially in low light, where the infrared component of the preflash is easily seen by the remote flashes. In general, here are a few positioning guidelines: Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 518
  9. V1.03 • In low light, the remote flash sensor doesn’t always have to have a direct line of sight to the camera’s internal flash. I’ve successfully hidden a remote flash behind the subject (to light the background or provide rim light). This works better over short distances, though. • You should be able to achieve Nikon’s stated 33 feet (10m) distance (within a 60° angle) in most situations, but beware of situations where there is a great deal of infrared energy present (some incandescent lighting produces infrared)—you may have to give up some distance where other infrared sources are present, as they’ll overwhelm the sensor and it won’t see the faint output of the internal flash. • I’ve been able to achieve remote triggers at better than 120° angles, but only at close distances (10 feet [3m]). • Triggering the remote flashes is only part of the equation. In general, remote flashes doing TTL need to be within 30° of the camera-subject axis. In other words, the angle formed by the flash/subject/camera needs to be 30° or less. Why? Because when subjects are lit from the side, the camera—which after all is doing the flash calculations—doesn’t see the full reflection of the flash’s output and may adjust its exposure incorrectly. Finally, there’s yet one more wireless trick that isn’t described in the Nikon manuals that every D200 user should know: Flash Lock (called FV Lock by Nikon; FV stands for Flash Value). This answers the problem of getting the internal flash to trigger a multiple wireless TTL set up when you don’t have i-TTL flashes as remotes 133. For example, Nikon sells a F wireless flash accessory called the SU-4, and some Nikon flash models can emulate that wireless function without being connected to an SU-4 (for example, the older SB-26). The critical element of the SU-4 circuitry is this: it triggers the flash connected to it to fire when it sees another flash fire, and it 133 Okay, it’s not perfectly TTL, as the other flashes aren’t considered in the exposure setting, but with a little trial and error, it effectively works like TTL. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 519
  10. V1.03 shuts down its connected flash when it sees the other flash stop firing. Since the D200’s internal flash is already set to the right flash exposure via FV Lock, the flashes connected to the SU-4’s just do the same exact thing. As long as the flashes aren’t all throwing their light on the same spot (e.g., one is used for filling light on one side of the face while another is used for the background while the internal flash is used for key light), this trick works well. But even if they are all firing their light on the same spot, you can easily control this by simply dialing down the internal flash with flash exposure compensation—every other flash will respond in kind, so it’s usually pretty easy to dial in the right compensation. Here’s the trick in more detail: 1. Set the Custom Setting #F4 on the D200 to FV Lock. 2. Set Custom Setting #E3 to TTL (if it isn’t already set to that). 3. Pop up the internal flash (press the Flash Release button to do this). 4. Before turning on your remote flashes, fire off a test exposure by pressing the FUNC button on the camera (the internal flash should fire). Get your main flash setting correct before proceeding. 5. Turn the remote flash units on. They all either need to be connected to an SU-4 or have a built-in SU-4 type of wireless mode selected. 6. Take your picture. All the flashes should participate in the exposure. 7. Since the remote flash units may be more powerful than the internal flash, you may have to adjust the position of the external flashes to be further from the subject (or use their diffusion domes to limit their power). When I’m feeling especially daring and creative, I actually set my exposure in Step #4 to Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 520
  11. V1.03 underexposure and then try to get the remote Speedlights to fire a little hotter than the internal flash, but this is a big trial and error process you’ll just have to experiment with yourself. External Flash Models for the D200 SB-600 The SB-600 is one of five external Speedlights that can provide TTL flash with the D200. The SB-600 is similar to the SB-800, but with fewer features and lower power ratings. The SB-600 was announced with the D70 and arrived in stores in spring 2004. Specifications GN: 138 (ft), 42 (m) (at 35mm head position and ISO 200) Weight: 10.6 oz. (300g) (w/o batteries) Size: 4.9” (123.5mm) tall x 2.7” (68mm) wide x 3.5” (90mm) deep Power: four AA batteries Recycle Time: 3.5 seconds minimum (full discharge) # of Flashes: ~200 at full manual Flash Duration: 1/900 to 1/25000 Coverage: (120 degrees horizontal, 110 degrees vertical) 14mm lens; also supports 24mm, 28mm, 35mm, 50mm, 70mm, and 85mm coverage Case: SS-600 included Key Features: TTL flash control on most TTL-capable Nikon bodies, preflash on F90X/N90s or later bodies; Full power TTL, seven power level manual settings. LCD panel shows settings. Rear curtain sync. Red-eye reduction. The SB- 600 can synchronize with up to nine additional flash units, in groups of three controlled by one SB-800 master flash. Head tilts from –7 degrees below horizontal up to 90 degrees above horizontal, and rotates -270 degrees to plus 180 degrees clockwise. Built-in diffuser card. Stand included. Automatic or Manual wireless remote firing possible. Wide angle autofocus assist light. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 521
  12. V1.03 To Set TTL Flash 1. Activate the flash. If it’s already in Standby, a partial press of the shutter release activates it; otherwise, press the power (ON/OFF) button on the SB-600 to turn the flash ON. 2. Select the type of TTL to be performed. Basically, you only have one choice: whether to cancel the “balanced fill-flash” mode (you do so by pressing the Mode button on the flash until only the TTL indicator appears; if TTL BL appears, the camera is in a Balanced Fill-Flash mode; see “Summary of i-TTL Flash Modes,” on page < 490>). H Note: When the D200 is set for spot metering, Standard TTL is set automatically. 3. Set the camera to Single Servo AF (flash only operates when the camera achieves focus; this isn’t technically required, but I like to tell people to use it as a reminder that focus has to be achieved for flash to operate). 4. Set the camera’s exposure mode, if you haven’t already. In Aperture-priority (A), Shutter-priority (S), and Manual (M) exposure modes, make any necessary aperture or shutter speed selections. Note: In Program exposure mode you can usually override the camera’s selection of aperture and shutter speed combinations by turning the D200’s Rear Command dial (when the camera is active). But note that the maximum aperture you can use is restricted in Program exposure mode (the actual value depends upon ISO setting; see “Allowable Apertures in Program Mode,” on page < 485>.H Note: The D200 and SB-600 may warn you of several possible errors when you partially press the shutter release to verify settings: - The lens must be set on its minimum aperture, or else the error message FEE appears in the viewfinder. - Any HI visible in the viewfinder indicates that overexposure (of the background exposure) is likely. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 522
  13. V1.03 - The shutter speed will be automatically reset to 1/250 if you selected a faster shutter speed in Shutter (S) or Manual (M) exposure mode. (If FP is set, however, the camera will use any shutter speed.) - In Manual (M) exposure mode, under and overexposure is indicated solely by the analog exposure display. If the exposure bar goes to either side of the $ point, the ambient- only lighting exposure will not be correct. 5. Focus on your subject by pressing lightly on the shutter release. Confirm that the subject is within flash distance. Unfortunately, the SB-600 does not have a distance scale on it, so you’ll have to either carry one of the charts duplicated below or memorize what distance it can reach at each zoom setting. Assuming you’ve confirmed the distance, you’re ready to shoot. SB-600 Usable Apertures and Flash Range in TTL mode (Feet) ISO 200 400 800 1600 14mm 24mm 35mm 50mm 85mm f/2 f/2.8 f/4 f/5.6 3 – 32 4.9 – 52 5.9 – 62 6.6 – 66 8.2 – 66 f/2.8 f/4 f/5.6 f/8 2.3 – 23 3.6 – 36 4.3 – 46 4.9 – 52 5.9 – 66 f/4 f/5.6 f/8 f/11 2 – 16 2.6 – 27 3 – 32 3.3 – 36 3.9 – 44 f/5.6 f/8 f/11 f/16 2 – 11 2 – 19 2.3 – 23 2.6 – 26 2.9 – 33 f/8 f/11 f/16 f/22 2 – 7.9 2 – 13 2 – 16 2 – 18 2.3 – 23 f/11 f/16 f/22 f/32 2 – 5.6 2 – 9.2 2 – 11 2 – 13 2 – 16 f/16 f/22 f/32 f/45 2 – 3.9 2 – 6.6 2 – 7.9 2 – 9.2 2 – 11 f/22 f/32 f/45 f/64 2 – 2.6 2 – 4.6 2 – 5.6 2 – 6.6 2 – 8.2 Note: The SB-600 manual is incorrect in some of its range specifications. The above table is correct (though rounded slightly in some places). For ISO 100, shift the numbers in the first column down by one row (i.e. the column for ISO 100 would start with f/1.4).. To Set Manual Flash 1. Activate the flash. If it’s already in Standby, a partial press of the shutter release activates it; otherwise, press the power (ON/OFF) button on the SB-600 to turn the flash ON. 2. Press the SB-600’s Mode button until Ë appears on the LCD. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 523
  14. V1.03 3. Set the D200 to Aperture-priority (A) or Manual (M) exposure mode and set your aperture and shutter speed, as usual. 4. Set the camera to Single Servo AF. While not absolutely required, this generally makes the camera’s response more predictable. 5. Focus on your subject by pressing lightly on the shutter release. Note the distance on the scale on the lens. 6. Simply changing the aperture on the camera causes the SB-600 to match it. Unfortunately, the SB-600 doesn’t have a distance scale, so you’ll have to use aperture=GN/distance to determine the correct flash exposure, and use the Guide Number tables below to determine the GN. Note: With lenses that don’t have CPUs (AI and AI-S), the aperture on the camera isn’t linked with the flash, so you have to adjust flash power settings on the SB-600 to control the flash output. Note: The power setting of the SB-600 is controlled in 1/6 stop increments between ½ and 1/64 power (plus you can set full power, 1/1). You control the setting by pressing the < and > buttons on the flash direction pad to choose a value. Wait a moment and the flash locks in the current value. Note: The SB-600 is capable of keeping up with the D200 at 5 fps at powers of 1/8, 1/16, 1/32, 1/64, or 1/128 as follows: 1/8 4 consecutive frames 1/16 8 consecutive frames 1/32 16 consecutive frames 1/64 30 consecutive frames However, let the flash cool at least 10 minutes after firing 40 consecutive flashes (normally this is 15 flashes in higher power and TTL modes). Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 524
  15. V1.03 SB-600 Guide Numbers at ISO 100 (feet) Power 14mm 24mm 28mm 35mm 50mm 70mm 85mm Full (1/1) 46 85 92 98 118 125 131 1/2 33 60 65 70 84 88 93 1/4 23 43 46 49 59 62 67 1/8 16 30 33 35 42 44 46 1/16 11.5 21 23 25 30 31 33 1/32 8.2 15.1 16 17 21 22 23 1/64 5.9 10.8 11.5 12.5 14.8 15.7 16.4 SB-600 Guide Numbers at ISO 100 (meters) Power 14mm 24mm 28mm 35mm 50mm 70mm 85mm Full (1/1) 14 26 28 30 36 38 40 1/2 9.9 18 20 21 26 27 28 1/4 7 13 14 15 18 19 20 1/8 4.9 9.2 9.9 10.6 12.7 13.4 14.1 1/16 3.5 6.5 7 7.5 9 9.5 10 1/32 2.5 4.6 4.9 5.3 6.4 6.7 7.1 1/64 1.8 3.3 3.5 3.8 4.5 4.8 5 Note: All numbers above 16 may be rounded to the nearest integer. That shouldn’t impact calculations by enough to be visible. To Manually Set the Zoom Head 1. Press the Zoom button on the flash direction pad to change the zoom setting. Each button press selects the next higher logical setting (and you’ll eventually loop back to the lowest setting). The ë symbol appears on the LCD when the setting doesn’t correspond to focal length of the lens. Note: To cancel automatic zoom head setting and lock a manual setting, hold the Zoom and - buttons for two seconds to enter the custom setting mode for the flash. Next, press the + button until you see the ë, and then press the Mode button to turn manual zoom On. Hold the Zoom and - buttons for two seconds to complete the setting. 2. To cancel a manual zoom setting, press the Zoom button on the flash Direction pad until the m no longer appears on the LCD (e.g., until the setting matches the lens being used). Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 525
  16. V1.03 Note: Remember that the Guide Number of the flash changes with the zoom setting. Note: If you pull out the built-in wide angle adapter and move it into position in front of the flashtube, the SB-600 is set to the 14mm and the automatic zoom head function cannot be set to another setting. To Set Flash Exposure Compensation Use the Ô and Õ buttons on the flash Direction pad to adjust the amount of compensation. The SB-600 allows a maximum of +3 stop and -3 stops of flash compensation, which is indicated in one-third stop increments on the flash compensation indicator. Note: The flash may not be able to produce +3 compensation in some situations (e.g., if it’s already firing at full power). To cancel compensation, repeat the process outlined above and set a value of 0.0. Note: Flash compensation does not change the background exposure calculated by the camera. Tip: It’s probably best to avoid flash compensation in any of the Balanced Fill-Flash TTL modes. You don’t know what level of compensation the camera is already making, so any changes you make are in addition to this unknown, camera- calculated compensation. If you need absolute control, switch to the Auto Aperture or Manual flash modes, where any compensation you dial in will be from a known flash level. To Set Red-Eye Reduction Set Red-eye reduction on the D200y holding the Flash Options button on the camera and turning the Rear Command dial until @ appears on the D200’s LCD). Note: Red-eye reduction works in most flash modes, but not in the Repeating Flash mode. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 526
  17. V1.03 SB-600 Notes • The D200’s focus mode should usually be set to Single Servo AF, since the flash will generally not fire unless the camera has achieved focus. • The Autofocus Assist light on the SB-600 is used automatically if the ambient light is low and you haven’t turned this function off on the flash. Autofocus assist only works at distances from 3.3 feet (1m) up to 33 feet (10m), and is only guaranteed to work with lenses from 24mm to 105mm. Note: The Autofocus Assist illuminator will not function unless the central autofocus sensor is selected or Closest Subject Priority is in effect . Note: You can turn off the Autofocus Assist illuminator on the SB- 600 by holding the Zoom and + buttons down for two seconds and using the SB-600’s Direction pad to navigate to the option and turn it OFF. No AF-ILL will appear in the flash’s LCD. • The SB-600 has an automatic standby power system. The SB-600 automatically turns off 40 seconds after the camera’s meter turns OFF (STBY is displayed on the flash’s LCD). A light press on the shutter release turns the D200’s light meter back ON, and the SB-600 turns ON at the same time. Note: The SB-600 has a “special” No Standby mode that can be set. Like the other flash command mode settings, you get to this function by holding the Zoom and + buttons down for two seconds and then navigating the options with the Direction pad on the flash. • After the flash fires, an icon may appear in the flash’s LCD along with a value. This indicates potential underexposure. This indicator only appears for three seconds after the shot. • The Rear Sync option must be selected on the camera. (Some earlier flash units had this selection on the flash, so I’ve included this note here just in case folks who previously had one of those Speedlights are wondering.) Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 527
  18. V1.03 • While the SB-600 has “click stops” for commonly used flash head positions (45, 60, 75, and 90 degrees for tilt, every 30 degrees for rotation), you aren’t restricted to those positions. Setting an intermediary position is allowed (though it can easily be dislodged). • Viewfinder Ready Light Warnings (blinking) occurs in the following conditions: - When you press the shutter release halfway and the SB- 600 is not correctly mounted on the hot shoe. - After the flash fires at full power, indicating possible underexposure. SB-800 The SB-800 is the top of Nikon’s flash lineup. The SB-800 is basically the same flash as the SB-80DX, but with additional features and support for the new i-TTL flash system. The SB- 800 was announced in July 2003 and arrived in stores in fall 2003. Specifications GN: 125 (ft), 38 (m) (at 35mm head position) Weight: 11.8 oz. (335g) (w/o batteries) Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 528
  19. V1.03 Size: 5” (127.5mm) tall x 2.8” (80.5mm) wide x 3.6” (91.5mm) deep Power: four AA batteries Recycle Time: 6 seconds minimum (full discharge) # of Flashes: ~150 at full manual Flash Duration: 1/1050 to 1/41600 Coverage: (120 degrees horizontal, 110 degrees vertical) 14mm lens; also supports 17mm, 24mm, 28mm, 35mm, 50mm, 70mm, 85mm, and 105mm coverage Case: SS-800 included Key Features: TTL flash control on most TTL-capable Nikon bodies, preflash on F90X/N90s or later bodies; Full power TTL, eight power level manual, and Automatic settings. LCD panel shows settings. Rear curtain sync. High Speed sync, Repeating flash, and red-eye reduction. The SB- 800 can synchronize with up to nine additional flash units, in groups of three controlled by one master flash. Head tilts from –7 degrees below horizontal up to 90 degrees above horizontal, and rotates -270 degrees to plus 180 degrees clockwise. Built-in diffuser card. Diffusion dome included, sample filter set included. Automatic or Manual wireless remote firing possible. Modeling light. Wide angle autofocus assist light. To Set TTL Flash 1. Activate the flash. If it’s already in Standby, a partial press of the shutter release activates it; otherwise, press the power (ON/OFF) button on the SB-800 to turn the flash ON. 2. Select the type of TTL to be performed. Basically, you only have one choice: whether to cancel the “balanced fill-flash” mode (you do so by pressing the Mode button on the flash until only the TTL indicator appears; if TTL BL appears, the camera is in a Balanced Fill-Flash mode; see “Summary of i-TTL Flash Modes” on page < 490>). H Note: The FP indicator may also appear. This indicates that the flash is ready to perform high speed sync at shutter speeds faster than 1/250 if necessary. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 529
  20. V1.03 Note: When the D200 is set for spot metering, Standard TTL is set automatically. 3. Set the camera to Single Servo AF (flash operates best when the camera achieves focus; this isn’t technically necessary, but I like to tell people to use it as a reminder that focus has to be achieved for flash to operate). 4. Set the camera’s exposure mode, if you haven’t already. In Aperture-priority (A), Shutter-priority (S), and Manual (M) exposure modes, make any necessary aperture or shutter speed selections. Note: In Program exposure mode you can usually override the camera’s selection of aperture and shutter speed combinations by turning the D200’s Rear Command dial (when the camera is active). But note that the maximum aperture you can use is restricted in Program exposure mode (the actual value depends upon ISO setting; see “Allowable Apertures in Program Mode” on page < 485>. H Note: The aperture the D200 (or you) selected also appears on the SB-800’s LCD panel when you partially press the shutter release, as does the allowable flash-to-subject distance range. Note: The D200 and SB-800 may warn you of several possible errors when you partially press the shutter release to verify settings: - The lens must be set on its minimum aperture, or else the error message FEE appears in the viewfinder. - Any HI visible in the viewfinder indicates that overexposure (of the background exposure) is likely. - The shutter speed will be automatically reset to 1/250 if you selected a faster shutter speed in Shutter (S) or Manual (M) exposure mode. - In Manual (M) exposure mode, under and overexposure is indicated solely by the analog exposure display. If the exposure bar goes to either side of the $ point, the ambient- only lighting exposure will not be correct. Thom Hogan’s Complete Guide to the Nikon D200 Page 530
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