GUTS, TOES and stringy things: biology or highenergy physics?

Chia sẻ: Nguyễn Quốc Lợi | Ngày: | Loại File: PPT | Số trang:40

0
72
lượt xem
10
download

GUTS, TOES and stringy things: biology or highenergy physics?

Mô tả tài liệu
  Download Vui lòng tải xuống để xem tài liệu đầy đủ

GUTs, TOEs and stringy  things: biology or  high­energy physics? Subtitle: Ways to teach the  fundamental question, “What are  we made of and what holds us  together?” Why should we teach it and if  so, when?

Chủ đề:
Lưu

Nội dung Text: GUTS, TOES and stringy things: biology or highenergy physics?

  1. GUTs, TOEs and stringy  things: biology or  high­energy physics? Subtitle: Ways to teach the  fundamental question, “What are  we made of and what holds us  together?” Why should we teach it and if  so, when? Gordon P. Ramsey Loyola University Chicago
  2. Why study particle  physics? • Addresses the fundamental  philosophical questions: What  are we made of and what holds  us together? • Particle physics is fundamental  to understanding the basic  structure of matter.  • It encompasses the studies all  of the known forces in nature  using conservation laws.
  3. Why study particle  physics? • With the ongoing research at  accelerators around the world,  the LHC going online and planned  future accelerators (NLC & VLHC),  it is state­of­the­art research.  • The unrelated benefits reaped  from past study of nuclear and  particle physics (nuclear  medicine and accelerated particle  treatments of cancer) are of  interest to everyone.  • Particle physics has strong  connections to cosmology and 
  4. Why study particle  physics? • On the more advanced level, it  is a culmination of mechanics  (Lagrangians & Hamiltonians),  E&M (accelerator physics; QED),  statistical physics (QCD field  theory) and modern physics (20th  century). Good capstone course  for undergraduates • It illustrates the interplay  between theory, phenomenology  and experimentation.
  5. Elements of particle physics in  the curriculum • Particle physics in the  curriculum should include  instruction on the basic  foundation of matter,  introduction to the known  fundamental forces, problems  addressed by each sub­area of  particle physics and the  current experimental research  to test the models proposed by  theorists. 
  6. Fundamental questions to  address • What is the ultimate structure  of matter? QCD, QED, EW,  Standard Model, beyond SM • What is the origin of mass?  Higgs mechanism • Why is gravity so weak?  – If X=fractional contribution of  gravitational binding energy to  the proton’s rest mass:  – X ≡  (Gmp2/Rp)/(mpc2) ≈  10­39  (dimensionless)
  7. Fundamental questions to  address • How does particle physics play  a role in astrophysics and  cosmology? • Can the known forces be  explained in terms of a  unifying theory?  – Long time unification – air,  water, earth and fire ⇔ gas,  liquid, solid, plasma – Unification of gravitational &  inertial mass, electricity & 
  8. Particle physics  curriculum at various  levels of instruction:  • high school  AP topics in modern physics as a  prelude:  – Key experiments, nuclear physics, γ  (photons) • Particle adventure – fundamental  particles & interactions • Quarknet activities  • Possible topics: – nuclear structure: make the  connection between molecules, atoms  and nuclei with fundamental particles – talk about relative scales of each in  macroscopic terms (p+–e­ distance in  H­atom is like basketball or soccer 
  9. Particle physics  curriculum at various  levels of instruction:  high school  – Application of basic physical  laws (forces & conservation  laws) to particle physics – Overview of the scientific  process (modeling,  experimentation and their  interplay) – Elementary quark model and  role of gluons – Overview of experimental 
  10. Particle physics  curriculum at various  levels of instruction:  • high school  Tools for instruction in high  school courses: – Quarknet – I2U2 (Interactions in  Understanding the Universe – Simulated data from accelerators – FNAL programs – PAN (Physics of Atomic Nuclei) – Cosmic ray e­Lab – EPPOG – European PP outreach group
  11. The Standard Model Bosons Quarks u c t up charm top E M γ d down s strange b bottom photon Weak Lepton W boson e electro µ muon τ tau ν ν ν n Z boson s e  e neutrino µ  neutrino τ  neutrino Strong g I II III gluon Generations
  12. Simple Quark Model • Highly successful model - neat and compact • Developed in 1963, Gell-Mann & Zweig • Properties and interactions described by 3 quarks:   up, down, and strange Proton u Neutron d u u d d • Properties of nucleons described by properties of quarks
  13. Simple Quark Model (cont’d)  Neutron:
  14. Proton u d u d Gluons u d u u s d s Sea u Quarks d Valence Quarks
  15. Fermilab → 40 miles west of us: Batavia, IL Currently one of the highest energy  accelerators       operating in the  world.
  16. Main Ring + Injector  Ring • Main Ring  Radius: 1 Km  (6.28 Km  circum.) • Protons on anti­ protons • Max energy: 1  TeV • 1 TeV = 1012 eV • COM = 2 TeV • 5 crossing 
  17. CDF (Colliding Detector  “Facility”)
  18. Brookhaven National  Laboratory
  19. Inside RHIC  RHIC superconducting magnet Inside the RHIC tunnel Two tubes, 2.4-mile ring Computer image magnetic field
  20. Unfortunately, cannot observe  colored particles directly… Look for hadron jets as signal of scattered partons: STAR p+p, √s = 200 GeV STAR Au+Au, √s      = 200  NN GeV STAR
Đồng bộ tài khoản