InDesign CS5 Bible- P17

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InDesign CS5 Bible- P17

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InDesign CS5 Bible- P17: InDesign is a powerful tool that serves as the standard program for professional layout and design. The latest version boasts a variety of updates and enhancements. Packed with real-world examples and written by industry expert Galen Gruman, this in-depth resource clearly explains how InDesign CS5 allows for better typography and transparency features, speedier performance, and more user control than any other layout program.

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  1. Chapter 33: Using Hyperlinks and Creating Web Pages Images pane In the Images pane, you choose how your images are converted to the Web’s GIF and JPEG for- mats, selecting options such as image quality and color palette: l Copy Images: Use this popup menu to determine how the InDesign document’s images are converted when copied to the folder you are saving your XHTML pages to. Your options are Original, which leaves them untouched (meaning that they won’t be converted into Web-compatible formats); Optimized, which converts them to the Web format speci- fied in the Image Conversion popup menu; and Link to Server Path, which does not copy the file but instead inserts an image link () to the current location. l Formatted: Select this check box to export the images to reflect any modifications made to them in InDesign, such as cropping, transparency, or scaling. Otherwise, the raw source files are exported (under the assumption that you will manipulate them further in a Web editor or image editor). l Image Conversion: Use this popup menu to specify what format images are converted to: GIF, JPEG, or Automatic (which selects the best format on a case-by-case basis). l GIF Options: Use the Palette popup menu to choose the color palette for the image: Adaptive (No Dither), Web, System (Win), or System (Mac). For Web display, the first two are best; use the other two for pages meant to be shown on a specific platform, such as pages available only on an internal company Web site. Select the Interlace check box to speed up the initial screen display of the images while the page is loading, but note that this can slow down overall page loading, so you should use it only with very large images. l JPEG Options: Use the Image Quality popup menu to select the image quality and thus the amount of compression (greater compression means lower quality): Low, Medium, High, or Maximum. Use the Format Method popup menu to control how the image appears as it loads on the Web page: Baseline (all at one time) or Progressive. Note that choosing Progressive can slow down overall page loading, so you should use it only with very large images. Advanced pane In the Advanced pane, you set how text formatting is converted to the Web’s version of styles, called cascading style sheets, or CSS. The CSS options are the following: l Embedded CSS: This option lets you control how text formatting such as paragraph styles are handled in the CSS style list that a Web document uses to apply text formatting. Note that text that had styles applied in the InDesign layout will have the styles indicated using tags for paragraph styles and tags for character styles in the exported Web page. You have two options: 755
  2. Part VIII: Multimedia Fundamentals l Include Style Definitions: If selected, this option creates CSS style definitions in the exported files that include the specific fonts and sizes used in the InDesign layout. This can be dangerous if you use many fonts that aren’t available in Web browsers, because unless the CSS style is changed to use Web-standard fonts, browsers substi- tute fonts of their choosing for these print-oriented fonts. Of course, by including these fonts in the CSS, the Web designer can easily and consistently replace print- oriented fonts with Web-oriented ones in a Web-editing program. l Preserve Local Overrides: If selected, this option preserves local formatting, such as the use of character styles and font styles such as italics, in the exported XHTML file. The Web designer should look out for the tags that result to ensure they don’t cause issues for the final Web page’s display. l No CSS: This ignores style information in the InDesign file, thus placing just simple tags at each paragraph and stripping out any tags. Essentially, you get unformat- ted text. l External CSS: This option adds a tag in the section of the exported file, using the style name specified in the field below the External CSS radio button. (Don’t forge the .css file name extension!) This means that after someone creates the specified CSS style file, the document knows what formatting to apply to the text. (Text that had styles applied has the styles indicated using tags for paragraph styles and tags for character styles.) External CSS style files ensure consistency across multiple Web pages, all of which can call on the same style file. But note that InDesign does not create a style file for you based on your InDesign document’s formatting — all style definitions must be done in your Web-editing software. New Feature The Embedded CSS option in InDesign CS5 replaces the previous version’s Empty CSS Declarations option, giv- ing you the new capabilities to export the InDesign style settings to the CSS file and to preserve local format- ting such as italics applied to text. n Tip Fonts generally safe to use for Web pages, due to widespread support for them by popular browsers, are the following TrueType and OpenType fonts: Arial, Courier New, Georgia, Monaco, Tahoma, Times New Roman, and Verdana. n The Advanced pane also lets you specify whether InDesign inserts a tag in the section of the exported file, using the script name specified in the field below the Link to External JavaScript check box, which must be selected for this to work. (Don’t forget the .js file name extension!) You must create your JavaScript elsewhere. After you’ve adjusted the XHTML Export Options dialog box’s settings as desired, click Export to create the XHTML file. 756
  3. Chapter 33: Using Hyperlinks and Creating Web Pages Summary InDesign lets you create hyperlinks and anchors within your documents — to Web addresses, pages, files, and specific text selections in your InDesign document, as well as to pages and text in other InDesign documents that are then clickable from a PDF file created from your InDesign file. InDesign can export layouts or selected objects to the Web’s XHTML format, converting graphics to Web-compatible versions and optionally including style definitions from the InDesign layout. However, these exported files make no attempt to replicate the layout. Instead, InDesign ensures that the Web designer has the latest versions of all the document’s contents in a format that the designer can work on directly using a Web editor such as Adobe Dreamweaver. 757
  4. CHAPTER Using Interactive Media and Creating PDF Documents I n most respects, a document is a document is a document, but in today’s electronic world, documents have evolved to include more than IN THIS CHAPTER the text and graphics that have comprised documents for centuries. Not Creating bookmarks only can you print documents the traditional way, but also you can deliver them electronically as files in the Web’s HTML format, as Adobe Portable Adding buttons and actions Document Format (PDF) files and e-book files, and as Flash animation files. Using page transitions That electronic delivery format permits a degree of interactivity never possi- ble in printed documents, including hyperlinks, automated actions, and the Working with audio and video use of audio and video objects. objects You create interactive documents — also called rich media documents and Previewing interactive features multimedia documents — just as you create print documents. InDesign’s Creating interactive PDFs and interactive functions work with those traditional capabilities; there’s no spe- e-books cial, interactive mode to work under. InDesign’s ability to export in these various rich media formats does raise some key questions as you create your multimedia documents. Theoretically, you could design a document to support all of these formats, but the reality is that not all functions work in all media: The fancy page-transition effects, for example, appear only in Flash and full-screen-view PDF files, whereas support for audio and video formats varies widely across the supported mul- timedia formats. So, it’s more likely you will have one or two formats in mind as you create a document, and you’ll use just the capabilities available in them. Regardless of what specific multimedia files you intend to create, the build- ing blocks are common across most of them. For example, most of the sup- ported multimedia formats can take advantage of hyperlinks as well as some button capabilities. Button-based actions work in interactive PDF, e-book, and Flash files. 759
  5. Part VIII: Multimedia Fundamentals This chapter goes through the interactive building-block functions first: bookmarks, buttons and actions, and audio and video file usage. Then I explain the issues in exporting to interactive PDF — the most commonly used interactive document format — and e-book files. Cross-Reference Chapter 33 explains how to create and work with hyperlinks, as well as how to export files to the Web’s HTML format. Chapter 35 explains how to create animations within InDesign for use in Adobe Flash files, as well as how to export Flash files. n Creating Bookmarks Bookmarks are an indexing mechanism used in Adobe PDF files. They typically act like tables of contents, letting you view the organization of a document through a set of clickable headings. Figure 34.1 shows an example file viewed in Adobe Acrobat Professional. FIGURE 34.1 An example PDF document with bookmarks (at left) 760
  6. Chapter 34: Using Interactive Media and Creating PDF Documents InDesign has two ways to create bookmark entries. One is simply to create a table of contents using the standard InDesign Table-of-Contents tool. (Be sure that the Create PDF Bookmarks option is selected in the Table of Contents dialog box.) The other is to specify bookmarks to spe- cific pages, objects, and/or text using the Bookmarks panel. Figure 34.2 shows the Bookmarks panel (choose Window ➪ Interactive ➪ Bookmarks) and its flyout menu. FIGURE 34.2 The Bookmarks panel and its flyout menu Note The Bookmarks panel includes any TOC entries in your document if the Create PDF Bookmarks option was selected in the Table of Contents dialog box. Chapter 27 covers the table of contents feature. n Using the Bookmarks panel To create your own bookmark entries — either instead of or in addition to having InDesign use the table of contents — select what you want the bookmark to refer to (what appears on-screen in the PDF file when a user clicks the bookmark in Acrobat or Adobe Reader). This can be a text selection or an object (frame or line); if nothing is selected, the bookmark is to the current page. Then choose New Bookmark from the Bookmarks panel’s flyout menu, or click the Add Bookmarks iconic button — the page icon — at the bottom of the panel. After you create the bookmark, use the Rename Bookmark menu option to give it a meaningful name; this is the name that appears in the Bookmarks pane in Acrobat or Adobe Reader. If you want a bookmark to be a subentry of another bookmark — the equivalent to a second-level or third-level headline in a table of contents — make sure that, before you create the bookmark, you select a bookmark in the Bookmarks panel. Any new bookmark is made a child of the selected bookmark. The other Bookmarks panel flyout menu options are straightforward: l Choose Delete Bookmark to delete any bookmarks selected in the panel. (You can also click the Delete Bookmarks iconic button — the trash can icon — at the bottom of the panel.) 761
  7. Part VIII: Multimedia Fundamentals l Choose Go to Selected Bookmark to jump to that page in your InDesign document. An easier way is to simply double-click the bookmark entry in the pane. l Choose Sort Benchmarks to sort benchmark subentries — this alphabetizes second-level, third-level, and other page-based subentries, and it sorts in order of appearance on the page any text- and/or object-based entries. It does not sort the top-level bookmarks, which appear in sequential order from the beginning of the document. However you create your bookmarks, InDesign places them automatically in interactive PDF files when you export to that format, as described later in this chapter. If you export to print (static) PDF format, you have to make sure the Bookmarks check box is selected in the General pane’s Include section in the PDF Export dialog box. (Chapter 32 covers print PDF export options in detail.) Bookmarks: What works where When using bookmarks, keep the following usage limits in mind for your intended output format: l Web pages: Bookmarks are converted into text anchors ( HTML tags). l PDF files: All bookmarks are retained, though for print PDF files you have to tell InDesign to retain the bookmarks while exporting. l E-book files: No bookmarks added through the Bookmarks panel are retained, though you can have InDesign export bookmarks into the e-book file from the document’s TOC. l Flash files: No bookmarks are retained. Creating Buttons and Actions One underused feature of the interactive PDF format is the ability to set actions. Most people sim- ply create PDF files that are on-screen versions of the print document — static representations — but PDF files can include forms, buttons, and other interactive elements. One reason for the underuse of actions is that few tools let you create the placeholder items for them, and adding them in Acrobat Standard or Acrobat Professional is awkward; they really work best when they’re created in the program that creates the whole document. InDesign addresses this reality with its support for interactive features. Note These buttons and actions also work in Flash files, which InDesign also lets you create (see Chapter 35). n Creating buttons In InDesign, you use the Buttons panel to create buttons and other objects that have actions associ- ated with them. 762
  8. Chapter 34: Using Interactive Media and Creating PDF Documents The first thing you do is draw your button using any InDesign frame, shape, line, or path tools. Even a text frame can be a button, though a text selection cannot. (Don’t let the term button fool you: You’re not limited to something that looks like a traditional button.) Select the object and choose Object ➪ Interactive ➪ Convert to Button to turn the object into a button. The Buttons panel appears. You can also select the object and click the Convert to Button iconic button at the bottom of the Buttons panel. You can convert a button to a regular object the same way, removing all associated states and actions: Select the button and then either choose Object ➪ Interactive ➪ Convert to Object or click the Convert to Object iconic button at the bottom of the Buttons panel. Be sure to add a name for the button in the Name field of the Buttons panel; InDesign puts in a default name such as Button 1, but that kind of generic name is hardly going to help you remem- ber what that button is if you need to work on it later. Tip InDesign comes with a library of buttons you can use instead of having to create your own. Just choose Sample Buttons from the Buttons panel’s flyout menu to open the Sample Buttons library file. (Choose Window ➪ Interactive ➪ Buttons to open the panel.) Then just drag the desired buttons from that library to your layout. Close the library when done. (Chapter 7 covers libraries in detail.) n Figure 34.3 shows the Buttons panel and its flyout menu, as well as a button created from a graphic. Note the button icon at the lower right of the graphic frame; InDesign places this non- printing indicator automatically so that you know what objects are buttons. FIGURE 34.3 A sample button (left), the Buttons panel, and its flyout menu. The button is in its default [Normal] state. Lower right: The bottom of the Buttons panel changes slightly when you select an object that is not a button. Preview Spread Delete State and Its Content Convert Button to Object Convert Object to Button 763
  9. Part VIII: Multimedia Fundamentals Creating button states Buttons work by invoking different states, or appearances, based on what the user is doing with them. Each button has three possible state appearances: [Normal], [Rollover], and [Click]: l The [Normal] state is added automatically when you create a button — it’s how the but- ton appears when the user’s mouse is not over it or hasn’t clicked it. In other words, it’s what shows when the user has done nothing other than display the page. l The [Rollover] state determines what happens when a user passes the mouse over the but- ton. Typically, you want a visual change to occur so that the user realizes that the object is in fact a button. l The [Click] state determines what happens when a user clicks the button. Here, you would typically have a visual indication that the button was in fact clicked. To determine the button appearance for any state, simply select the button and the desired state in the Buttons panel, and then make your modifications using InDesign’s standard tools. For exam- ple, for the [Rollover] state in Figure 34.3, I used the Swatches panel to change the button’s color. You could do much more than that, such as change a frame’s contents, shape, and as many other attributes as desired. You can also use InDesign’s standard methods to place content into the but- tons (such as choosing File ➪ Place or pressing Ô+D or Ctrl+D, or choosing Edit ➪ Paste Into or pressing Option+Ô+V or Ctrl+Alt+V). New Feature InDesign CS5 has two new options in the Buttons panel. One is the Preview Spread iconic button that opens the Preview panel, which shows you a preview of the current spread to test out buttons and other interactive functions before exporting your interactive PDF or Flash file. (The Preview panel is covered later in this chap- ter.) The other is the Hidden Until Triggered check box, which prevents the button from appearing until it is triggered, such as if it is clicked or rolled over. n Setting button actions There are six types of mouse-related conditions you can use as triggers for button actions. Even though at first they may seem related, these actions have nothing directly to do with states; you can have only one state yet have all six triggers invoke actions. You associate actions to these triggers in the Event popup menu. (If no action is associated to a trigger, that trigger is inactive.) The triggers in the Event popup menu are as follows: l On Release: Here, you can set what actions occur when a user releases the mouse after clicking the button. Typically, you want the button to do nothing in this case; if so, you simply set no action. l On Click: Here, you can set what actions occur when a user clicks the button. l On Roll Over: Here, you can set what actions occur when a user’s mouse moves within the button’s boundaries. 764
  10. Chapter 34: Using Interactive Media and Creating PDF Documents l On Roll Off: Here, you can set what actions occur when a user’s mouse moves past the button’s boundaries. Typically, you want the button to do nothing in this case; if so, you simply set no action. l On Blur (PDF): Here, you can set what actions occur when a user clicks another button or form element. This trigger works only in interactive PDF documents. l On Focus (PDF): Here, you can set what actions occur when a user clicks this button after having clicked another button or form element. This trigger works only in interactive PDF documents. Each event trigger can have one or more actions assigned to it. Click the + iconic button below the Event popup menu to add an action, and add as many actions as you want to be triggered by the mouse event shown in the Event popup menu. (Use the – iconic button to remove a selected action.) You can reorder actions by dragging them within the list. When you click the + button, the Buttons panel displays the Actions popup menu. Choose the desired action for the current event and then specify any related settings (such as page number or movie file to play) appropriate for the selected action in the popup menus and fields that appear below the actions list. As an example, Figure 33.4’s Buttons panel shows an Animation action and a Sound action applied to an On Click event, as well as the specific controls related to that action. For both interactive PDF and Flash files, the options in the Actions popup menu are Go to Destination, Go to First Page, Go to Last Page, Go to Next Page, Go to Previous Page, Go to URL, Show/Hide Buttons, Sound, and Video. For interactive PDF files only, options include Go to Next View, Go to Previous View, Open File, and View Zoom. For Flash files only, options include Animation, Go to Page, Go to State, Go to Next State, and Go to Previous State. New Feature The Go to Destination option in InDesign CS5 replaces the Go to Anchor option in the previous version, and the Video option replaces the former Movie option. New options include the Animation action and the three state-oriented actions. n By combining state appearances, events, and actions, you can create a truly interactive document for export to interactive PDF or Flash formats. Cross-Reference The state-oriented actions for exported Flash files, as well as the new States panel in which you create them, are covered in Chapter 35. n Buttons, states, and actions: What works where When using buttons and actions, keep the following usage limits in mind for your intended output format: l Web pages: No buttons or states are retained. 765
  11. Part VIII: Multimedia Fundamentals l PDF files: For interactive PDF files, all buttons and states in the Buttons panel are retained, as are all the actions except Animation, Go to Page, Go to State, Go to Next State, and Go to Previous State. For print PDF files, buttons and their states and actions are removed, though you can specify that the buttons are retained as static graphics during export (see Chapter 32). l E-book files: No buttons or states are retained. l Flash files: All buttons and states are retained, as are all actions except Go to Next View, Go to Previous View, Open File, and View Zoom. Using Page Transitions InDesign supports page transitions, the kind of effects you typically see in PowerPoint slide shows. Note These page transitions appear only in interactive PDF and Flash SWF files, and one page transition — Page Turn — works only in Flash SWF files. Furthermore, to see the page transitions, you need to run Adobe Reader or Adobe Acrobat in full-screen mode (for PDF files) or use Flash Player 10 (for SWF files). n You add such transitions in one of four ways: l Choose Page Transitions ➪ Choose from the Pages panel’s flyout menu (choose Windows ➪ Pages or press Ô+F12 or Ctrl+F12). l Choose Layout ➪ Page Transitions ➪ Choose. l Choose Choose from the Page Transitions panel’s flyout menu (choose Window ➪ Interactive ➪ Page Transitions). l Choose an option from the Page Transitions panel’s Transitions popup menu. For the first three methods, you get the Page Transitions dialog box shown in Figure 34.4. If you use the Transitions popup menu, you don’t get that visual selection when choosing an option. However, after you choose a page transition, a thumbnail preview appears in the Page Transition dialog box; if you hover your mouse on that thumbnail, InDesign animates it so that you can see the effect in action. Select the transition you want to apply. Unless you select the Apply to All Spreads check box, these page transitions are applied to just the selected pages. The Pages panel shows a double-page icon to the lower right of the spreads that have transitions applied, as you can see in Figure 34.4. You can edit these effects in the Page Transitions panel, such as by setting the transition’s speed and direction, as also shown in the figure. In addition to editing the Page Transitions panel directly, you can also get to it by choosing Layout ➪ Page Transitions ➪ Edit or by choosing Page Transitions ➪ Edit from the Pages panel’s flyout menu. 766
  12. Chapter 34: Using Interactive Media and Creating PDF Documents FIGURE 34.4 Left: The Page Transitions dialog box. Center: The Page Transitions panel. Right: The Pages panel; note the double-rectangle icons at the lower-right side of the spreads that indicate page transitions are applied to those spreads. If you applied a page transition to just selected pages but then decide you want to apply a page transition to all spreads, just go to one of the pages that has the page transition applied, or select that page in the Pages panel and then choose Apply to All Spreads in the Page Transitions panel’s flyout menu, or click the Apply to All Spreads iconic button at the bottom of the panel. To change selected pages’ transitions, simply choose a new one using the Choose menus described earlier or choose a new transition from the Page Transitions panel. Note that you can remove all page transitions by choosing Page Transitions ➪ Clear All from the Pages panels’ flyout menu, choosing Layout ➪ Page Transitions ➪ Clear All, or choosing Clear All from the Page Transitions dialog box’s flyout menu. Embedding Video and Sound In Design lets you place video and sound files in your InDesign document to allow playback in interactive documents. (After you’ve placed the file, you can size it like any other placed graphic: You’re essentially sizing the window in which the video or sound plays.) InDesign has several limits in what kind of video and audio files it can import, as well as how those files can be used in exported files: l Video: InDesign can place Flash video (.flv and .f4v files), QuickTime (.mov files) video files, and Microsoft AVI (.avi files) video files into layouts. The QuickTime and AVI files can be played only in exported interactive PDF files; the other formats can be used in exported Flash and interactive files. 767
  13. Part VIII: Multimedia Fundamentals l Animation: InDesign can place Adobe Flash Player presentations (SWF files), which it can export to interactive PDF files, e-book files, Flash files, and HTML pages. l Audio: InDesign supports the MP3, Apple AIFF, and Microsoft WAV formats. It can export all three formats to interactive PDF files, but only MP3 to Flash files. New Feature Previous versions of InDesign often had trouble exporting video and audio in a way that resulted in reliable playback in Acrobat Pro and Adobe Reader. InDesign CS5 fixes many of those issues, and you should get reli- able playback when using version 9 or later of Acrobat and Reader. However, to support QuickTime, AVI, AIFF, and WAV files, InDesign places the media into a compatibility-mode layer in the PDF files, which may still result in playback issues. Therefore, it’s best not to use these older formats. InDesign CS5 includes the Adobe Media Encoder that lets you convert QuickTime and AVI formats to Flash Video format, and you can use tools such as Apple’s iTunes to convert AIFF and WAV files to MP3 format. n Using the Media panel The Media panel is where you can control the playback options for video, animation, and audio files. You open the panel by choosing Window ➪ Interactive ➪ Media. Figure 34.5 shows the Media panel for the three kinds of media files. FIGURE 34.5 The Media panel for, from left to right, animation, audio, and video files Place a Video from a URL Place a Video or Audio File Set Interactive PDF Export Options New Feature The Media panel in InDesign CS5 replaces the Movie Options and Sound Options dialog boxes in previous ver- sions of InDesign. n 768
  14. Chapter 34: Using Interactive Media and Creating PDF Documents Common options in the Media panel are the following: l The Place a Video from a URL iconic button, if clicked, opens the Place Video from URL dialog box in which you enter a Web address for a Flash-compatible video file that you want to place in the InDesign document. Note that for the user to play back the video from the exported file, he or she must have an active Internet connection. l The Video from URL flyout menu option also opens the Place Video from URL dialog box. l The Place a Video or Audio File iconic button, if clicked, opens the Place Media dialog box, in which you select the audio or video files you want to place in your layout. Unlike the Place dialog box, there are no import options. l The Set Interactive PDF Export Options iconic button, if clicked, opens the PDF Options dialog box. In that dialog box, you can add a textual description to describe the file (it appears if you hover the mouse over the media object in an exported interactive PDF file) and can specify that the video plays in a floating window, rather than in the window defined by the object frame in the InDesign layout, and also set the size and position of that window. Note the ability to specify a floating video window is not available if you have selected an audio file. l The PDF Options flyout menu option also opens the PDF Options dialog box. Working with animations For SWF animations, the Media panel’s options are straightforward: l Using the Back and Forward iconic buttons, you can move through each state (such as a slide). l If selected, the Play on Page Load check box ensures that the animation plays when the page containing it is opened in the exported interactive PDF or Flash file. l The Poster popup menu lets you choose the preview image for the Flash file that appears in the exported interactive PDF or Flash file. The options are None, Standard, From Current Frame, and Choose Image. The Standard option uses a curved-F icon as the poster image. Working with audio For audio files, the Media panel’s options are also straightforward: l Use the Play iconic button to listen to the file. It turns into the Pause iconic button, which you can click to stop the playback. You can also use the slider bar to move within the audio file to choose what to play back; the time indicator below shows the current time position for the audio and the total time. l If selected, the Play on Page Load check box ensures that the audio plays when the page containing it is opened in the exported interactive PDF or Flash file. l The Stop on Page Load check box, if selected, stops the audio playback when the page containing it is opened — you might use this option if you started playback on a different page such as through a button action, as described earlier in this chapter. 769
  15. Part VIII: Multimedia Fundamentals l If selected, the Loop check box ensures that the audio file continues to play, returning to the beginning each time it ends. If not selected, the audio file plays just once. l The Poster popup menu lets you choose the preview image for the audio file that appears in the exported interactive PDF or Flash file. The options are None, Standard, and Choose Image. The Standard option uses the speaker icon as the poster image. Working with video For video files, the Media panel’s options are more complex: l Use the Play iconic button to view the file. It turns into the Pause iconic button, which you can click to stop the playback. You can also use the slider bar to move within the video file to choose what to play back; the time indicator below shows the current time position for the video and the total time. l Use the Audio iconic button to turn audio on or off. If the icon is a speaker with three curves to its right, the audio is on; if only the speaker is visible, the audio is off. l If selected, the Play on Page Load check box ensures that the video plays when the page containing it is opened in the exported interactive PDF or Flash file. l If selected, the Loop check box ensures that the video file continues to play, return- ing to the beginning each time it ends. If not selected, the video file plays just once. Note that video-looping works only if the document is exported to a Flash file. l The Poster popup menu lets you choose the preview image for the video file that appears in the exported interactive PDF or Flash file. The options are None, Standard, From Current Frame, and Choose Image. The Standard option uses a filmstrip icon as the poster image. l The Controller popup menu lets you change the skin, or frame for the video, that appears in the playback window in the exported document and contains the play- back controls. The 17 options control what controls appear. For example, SkinAllOverNoFullscreen displays the skin around the full playback window but removes the full-screen control. SkinPlaySeekCaption displays the skin below the video window, with the play, seek, and caption controls enabled. l If you’ve chosen a Controller popup menu option other than None, you can select the Show Controller on Rollover check box to have the playback controls appear when you move the mouse over the video in the exported document. If unselected, the playback controls appear only when the video is playing. l Use the Navigation Points control to set up playback points for the video. First, use the playback slider bar to move to a specific location in the video, or play the video and click Pause when you reach the desired location. Then click the + iconic button to add that location as a navigation point. (You can rename the navigation points by double- clicking their names and entering a new name. Select a navigation point and click the – iconic button to delete it.) Once you have set up navigation points, you can set button actions to play the video from that point in the Buttons panel (choose From Navigation Point in the Options popup menu in that panel and the desired navigation point from the Point popup menu that then appears). 770
  16. Chapter 34: Using Interactive Media and Creating PDF Documents Previewing Interactive Documents InDesign CS5 has a new panel called Preview that lets you test out your interactive features before exporting your layout to interactive PDF or Flash formats. You access the panel by choosing Window ➪ Interactive ➪ Preview or by pressing Shift+Ô+Return or Ctrl+Shift+Enter. As the figure below shows, the panel is simple, with iconic buttons that let you play the current preview mode and reset the preview to the initial state. You control what is played using the Set Preview Selection Mode (for selected objects), Set Preview Spread Mode (for the current spread), and Set Preview Document Mode (for the entire document) iconic button. The Preview panel’s flyout menu has the same preview mode options, as well as the Test in Browser option to preview the document in a Web browser. A quick way to preview the entire document is to press Shift+Option+Ô+Return or Ctrl+Alt+Shift+Enter. You can also replay a preview by Option+clicking or Alt+clicking the Play iconic button. The flyout menu’s Edit Preview Settings option opens the Preview Settings dialog box, where you can change preview options; the controls here are similar to the ones in the Interactive PDF Export dialog box covered later in this chapter. Play Preview Set Preview Document Mode Clear Preview Set Preview Spread Mode Go to Previous Page Set Preview Selection Mode Current page/spread indicator Go to Next Page Media files: What works where When using video, audio, and animations, keep the following usage limits in mind for your intended output format: l Web pages: Only SWF files are retained. l PDF files: All media files are retained and can be played in interactive PDF files; print PDF files do not contain the embedded media files. Flash SWF files are supported only if you export Acrobat 6 (PDF 1.5) format or newer. You should use Acrobat Pro 9 or Adobe Reader 9 or later; earlier versions may have difficulty playing back some embedded media files. 771
  17. Part VIII: Multimedia Fundamentals l E-book files: Only SWF files are retained. l Flash files: QuickTime, AVI, AIFF, and WAV files are not exported, and their poster images are retained as static images. Flash SWF, Flash video, and MP3 audio files are exported. Exporting to Interactive PDFs and E-Books PDF files are the most versatile file format that Adobe has created because they support both print and interactive features in one file. Because of the ubiquity of the Adobe Reader, they also have become a de facto standard way to distribute multimedia information on computers and via the Web. New Feature InDesign CS5 has split its export options for PDFs into print PDF and interactive PDF options, with the interac- tive PDF option the one to use to retain button actions, media playback, and page transitions. The interactive PDF export options in InDesign CS5 have also changed significantly, with more controls available than in pre- vious versions. n E-books — specifically Adobe’s version known as Digital Edition EPUB files — are loosely based on the PDF format. Adobe created the Digital Edition variation of the EPUB format as a limited variation of PDFs for use in electronic book readers, such as the Apple iPad, as well as for distribu- tion via a separate reader application. These e-book files are meant to be used like traditional book pages, so they strip out most interactivity. Exporting interactive PDFs Most of what you need to do to export interactive PDF files is the same as for regular print docu- ments. The biggest difference is that there are several options in the Export Adobe PDF dialog box specific to interactive documents that you should use. Cross-Reference Chapter 32 covers how to export InDesign documents to PDF files for print usage. n To start your export, choose File ➪ Export or press Ô+E or Ctrl+E and then choose Adobe PDF (Interactive) in the Format popup menu (Mac) or Save as Type popup menu (Windows). The Export to Interactive PDF dialog box (shown in Figure 34.6) then appears with the following options: 772
  18. Chapter 34: Using Interactive Media and Creating PDF Documents FIGURE 34.6 The Export to Interactive PDF dialog box l Pages: The options in this section control what pages are exported and how pages are handled. l Select the All radio button to export the entire document; enter a range of pages, such as 2–5, 8, to select specific pages. l Select the View after Exporting check box to launch Acrobat or Adobe Reader with the exported file. l Select the Embed Page Thumbnails check box to have images of each page included in the PDF file, which can help navigation of pages within Acrobat or Reader. l Select the Create Acrobat Layers check box to create layers in the Acrobat file to match the layers in the InDesign layout. Doing so can improve fidelity of interactive elements. l Select the Create Tagged PDF check box to embed XML tag information into the PDF file. This is useful for XML-based workflows. l View: This popup menu lets you set the zoom level for the exported PDF file when a user opens it. The options are Default, Actual Size, Fit Page, Fit Width, Fit Height, Fit Visible, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%. The Default option uses whatever default the user has set in his or her copy of Acrobat or Reader. l Layout: This popup menu lets you set how pages appear in the PDF: Default, Single Page, Single Page (Continuous), Two Up (Facing), Two Up Continuous (Facing), Two Up (Cover Page), and Two Up Continuous (Cover Page). The Default option uses whatever default the user has set in their copy of Acrobat or Reader. The options with (Continuous) 773
  19. Part VIII: Multimedia Fundamentals in their names have no space between pages, whereas those without it do. The Two Up options show pages side by side; those with (Facing) in their names start with a facing- page spread composed of a left-hand page and an adjacent right-hand page, whereas those with (Cover Page) in their names start with a right-hand page and then show the rest as a series of facing-page spreads. l Presentation: In this section, if the Open in Full Screen Mode check box is selected, the PDF file opens in full-screen mode, with no Acrobat or Reader controls visible. If the Flip Pages Every check box is selected, you can enter a time in the adjacent text field to have Acrobat or Reader automatically play each page as if it were a slide show, with each page appearing for the number of seconds specified. l Page Transitions: This popup menu lets you specify what page transitions are used in the exported PDF if displayed in full-screen mode in Acrobat or Reader. If you select From Document, whatever page transitions specified in the InDesign document are used; other- wise, the selected page transition is used, overriding any set in InDesign. l Buttons and Media: This section lets you control how buttons, button actions, and media files are exported. By default, the Include All radio button is selected, which enables all these interactive features in the exported PDF file. You can turn off these interactive fea- tures by selecting Appearance Only instead; this displays the buttons as static graphics and the media files as static poster images. l Image Handling: This section lets you control the quality of the JPEG images that the documents’ images are converted into during PDF export: l The Compression popup menu lets you choose JPEG (Lossy), JPEG 2000 (Lossless), or Automatic. The JPEG (Lossy) option eliminates some image detail to decrease file size. The Automatic option lets InDesign decide for which images to eliminate image detail. l The JPEG Quality popup menu lets you choose the degree of detail elimination to apply if JPEG (Lossy) or Automatic are chosen in the Compression popup menu. The Minimum option eliminates the most detail to save the most space, whereas the Maximum option eliminates the least detail but uses the most space of the com- pressed-file options. l The Resolution popup menu and text field let you specify the image resolution for the images. The default of 72 dpi is appropriate for Web browsers and files to be opened in Acrobat or Reader on a Mac. The 96 dpi setting is appropriate for files to be opened in Acrobat or Reader in Windows. The 144 dpi option is appropriate for mobile devices, and the 300 dpi option is appropriate for files you expect readers will want to print, not just view on-screen. Note that you can enter any value you want in the text field. l Security: If clicked, this button opens the Security dialog box, in which you set the stan- dard PDF security options, such a requiring a password to open the file, as covered in Chapter 32. Click OK when done setting the options to create the interactive PDF file. 774
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