ITIL V2 : Service Support

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ITIL V2 : Service Support

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This document provides a summary of the most relevant information of the ITIL Service Support V2 book to help with preparation of the Exin certificate in ITIL Service Management

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  1. ITIL V2 : Service Support Summary Author: Pieter Dubois mail address: duboisp@be.ibm.com Total Pages: 30 Document Version: 1.2 June, 2003
  2. IGS non-Confidential Document Control Distribution Pieter Dubois ITIL interest groups Revision History Date of this revision: 16/06/2003 Date of next revision: TBD Revision Number Revision Date Summary of Changes Changes marked (1) 20/11/2002 Version 1.0 1.1 December 2002 slight adaptations 1.2 June 2003 prepare for publication References: R Service Support (CCTA) - ISBN 0 11 330015 8 IBM Belgium Page 2 of 31
  3. IGS non-Confidential 1. Overview..................................................................................................................5 1.1 Management Summary......................................................................................5 2 Introduction to ITIL.....................................................................................................6 2.1 ITIL is...................................................................................................................6 2.2 General Service Management benefits...............................................................6 3 Relationship between processes...............................................................................7 3.1 Configuration Management.................................................................................7 3.2 Service Desk........................................................................................................7 3.3 Incident Management..........................................................................................8 3.4 Problem Management.........................................................................................8 3.5 Change Management..........................................................................................8 3.6 Release Management.........................................................................................9 4 Configuration Management.....................................................................................10 4.1 Mission Statement.............................................................................................10 4.2 Activities.............................................................................................................10 4.3 Benefits..............................................................................................................10 4.4 Problems............................................................................................................11 4.5 Costs..................................................................................................................11 4.6 Reporting...........................................................................................................11 4.6.1 Management Reporting...............................................................................12 4.6.2 Key Performance Indicators........................................................................12 4.7 Roles & Responsibilities....................................................................................12 4.7.1 Configuration Manager................................................................................12 4.7.2 Configuration librarian.................................................................................12 5 Service Desk............................................................................................................14 5.1 Mission Statement.............................................................................................14 5.2 Activities.............................................................................................................14 5.3 Benefits..............................................................................................................14 5.4 Problems............................................................................................................15 5.5 Implementation considerations..........................................................................15 5.6 Service Desk type considerations.....................................................................15 5.6.1 Local Service Desk......................................................................................15 5.6.2 Central Service Desk...................................................................................15 5.6.3 Virtual Service Desk....................................................................................16 5.7 Reporting...........................................................................................................16 5.8 Service Desk profile...........................................................................................16 6 Incident Management..............................................................................................18 6.1 Definition and mission statement.......................................................................18 6.1.1 Mission statement Incident Management....................................................18 6.1.2 Definitions....................................................................................................18 6.2 Activities.............................................................................................................18 6.3 Benefits..............................................................................................................18 6.4 Implementation Considerations & Success factors...........................................19 6.5 Problems............................................................................................................19 6.6 Reporting...........................................................................................................19 6.7 Roles & Responsibilities....................................................................................19 6.7.1 Incident Manager.........................................................................................19 6.7.2 Incident-handling support staff....................................................................20 6.7.3 Second line support.....................................................................................20 7 Problem Management............................................................................................21 IBM Belgium Page 3 of 31
  4. IGS non-Confidential 7.1 Mission Statement and scope...........................................................................21 7.1.1 Goal.............................................................................................................21 7.1.2 Scope...........................................................................................................21 7.1.3 Definition......................................................................................................21 7.2 Activities.............................................................................................................21 7.2.1 Problem Control...........................................................................................21 7.2.2 Error Control................................................................................................22 7.2.3 Proactive Problem Management.................................................................22 7.3 Benefits..............................................................................................................22 7.4 Problems............................................................................................................22 7.5 Planning and implementation considerations....................................................23 7.6 Reporting...........................................................................................................23 7.7 Roles..................................................................................................................23 7.7.1 Problem Manager........................................................................................23 7.7.2 Problem Support..........................................................................................23 8 Change Management..............................................................................................24 8.1 Goal, scope and definitions...............................................................................24 8.1.1 Goal.............................................................................................................24 8.1.2 Scope...........................................................................................................24 8.1.3 Definitions....................................................................................................24 8.2 Activities.............................................................................................................25 8.3 Benefits..............................................................................................................25 8.4 Costs & Problems..............................................................................................26 8.5 Planning & Implementation considerations.......................................................26 8.6 Reporting...........................................................................................................26 8.7 Roles & Responsibilities....................................................................................27 8.7.1 Change Manager.........................................................................................27 8.7.2 Change Advisory Board...............................................................................27 9 Release Management..............................................................................................28 9.1 Goal, Scope & Definitions..................................................................................28 9.1.1 Goal.............................................................................................................28 9.1.2 Scope...........................................................................................................28 9.1.3 Definitions....................................................................................................28 9.2 Activities.............................................................................................................29 9.3 Benefits..............................................................................................................29 9.4 Problems............................................................................................................29 9.5 Planning & Implementation considerations.......................................................30 9.6 Costs..................................................................................................................30 9.7 Reports..............................................................................................................30 9.7.1 Key Performance Indicators........................................................................30 9.7.2 Management Reporting...............................................................................31 9.8 Roles & responsibilities......................................................................................31 IBM Belgium Page 4 of 31
  5. IGS non-Confidential 1. Overview 1.1 Management Summary This document provides a summary of the most relevant information of the ITIL Service Support V2 book to help with preparation of the Exin certificate in ITIL Service Management. The following topics for all processes got particular attention: • What is ITIL • Mission statement different ITIL processes • Activities of each ITIL process • Benefits/difficulties/costs implementing ITIL process • Links dependencies with other ITIL processes • Information flow with other ITIL processes • ITIL process roles and responsibilities • Order of implementation within ITIL process • Key Performance Indicators of and reports about the ITIL Process IBM Belgium Page 5 of 31
  6. IGS non-Confidential 2 Introduction to ITIL 2.1 ITIL is • A Public Domain Framework: the information is publicly available and can be used by everyone for implementation • Best practice Framework: the information documents industry best practice guidance. While not detailing every action that should be done, which is organization dependant, it provides the goals, general activities, inputs and outputs of the various processes. It provides a framework in which to place existing methods and activities. • De facto standard: ITIL by its widespread use became a de facto standard. The advantage is that there is a common language for people to speak. This makes education very important to provide all people in the process this common language • Quality Approach: ITIL focuses on providing high quality services with a focus on customer relationships. There is a strong relationship between the IT organization and the Customers. • Process Based: ITIL is a process based method. It sees IT Service Management also as a Business Process and tries to organize it that way. 2.2 General Service Management benefits • Improved quality of service – more reliable business support • Formalizes the use of procedures so that they are more reliable to follow • Provides better view of current IT capabilities. • Provides better information on current IT services provided. • Better understanding of IT support by the business. • Better motivated staff through better management of expectations and responsibilities. • Enhanced Customer satisfaction as it is clear what service providers know and deliver. • More flexibility and adaptability through acknowledgement and formalizing working in a changing environment. • Faster cycle times and greater success rates on implementing changes. IBM Belgium Page 6 of 31
  7. IGS non-Confidential 3 Relationship between processes 3.1 Configuration Management Configuration management is an integral part of all other service management processes. • Change Management: current, accurate information about all components in the IT infrastructure makes Change management is more effective. It can even be integrated with Configuration Management. As a minimum logging of all changes should be done under control of Configuration Management. Also impact assessment should be done based on data of the CMDB. All change requests should be entered and updated in the CMDB. • Incident Management/Problem Management: Information from the CMDB help the service support group to solve Incidents and Problems faster by understanding the probably cause of failure on the Configuration Item. The CMDB should link Incident records and Problem records to the failing CI and the User. • Release Management: Requires the CMDB to know what CI’s have to be changed with a new release. • Service Level Management: uses info from the CMDB to identify CI’s making up a particular service for which SLA’s are in place. With this information, underpinning agreements can be set up. • Financial Management for IT: needs to know which components are used by whom in order to be able to charge the right departments • IT Service Continuity and Availability management: needs to know the CI’s to perform risk analysis and impact analysis on the service and business when a component fails. • Service Desk: uses CMDB information on CI’s to help resolve incidents or provide feedback on the status of a CI to the User. 3.2 Service Desk Service desk is the SPOC between service provider and Users on a day-to-day basis. • Incident Management: SD is the focal point in the incident management process. It its activities are: registering Incidents, informing Users about incidents, and management of the incident end-to-end. • Change Management: As changes can cause incidents, and SD is the SPOC for incidents, it should know about all changes. SD can act as a focal point for Change requests of Users, and inform Users on progress of changes. SD can be given delegation to implement Changes to circumvent Incidents within a scope. • Problem Management: informs the Service Desk on the progress of managing problems. • Service Level Management: Any impact on SLA will arrive at the SD. So SD needs to know what the relevant SLA’s are such that incidents related to services with SLA’s get appropriate priority. • IT Service Continuity: If business continuity plans are invoked, SD plays an important coordination role. • Configuration Management: good info on CI’s helps the SD managing requests and incidents. IBM Belgium Page 7 of 31
  8. IGS non-Confidential 3.3 Incident Management • Problem Management: an incident that has a large impact or several incidents having the same cause can lead to investigation of a problem. Therefore all Incidents should be recorded and available for investigation by Problem Management. • Service Desk: Is the prime owner of the incident management process. It coordinates all actions required to manage an incident. • Change Management: Changes can lead to new incidents; therefore a way of linking incidents to changes is required. • Configuration Management: the CMDB can help incident management with identification of the CI in question. Also because of interrogation & reporting reasons it would be good to link or insert incident records in the CMDB. • Service Level Management: priorities given to incidents and escalation procedures should be agreed upon as part of the SLM process and documented in the SLA’s. 3.4 Problem Management • Incident management: PM has to have access to accurate and comprehensive recording of Incidents in order to examine the cause of incidents and trends that are happening. • Configuration Management: PM uses the CMDB to record/update its problem records, and to identify CI’s exhibiting Problems • Availability Management: is strongly connected with PM in order to identify trends and to instigate remedial action. • Change Management: Known Errors give rise to Request for Changes which fall under the responsibility of Change Management • Service Desk: PM keeps SD up-to-date of ongoing Problem Resolution. 3.5 Change Management • Configuration Management: is required for change management as it depends on the accuracy of the CMDB to assess the full impact of a change. • Release Management: All releases have to go through change management when implemented in production • Service Level Management: is provided details of the Change process in the SLA’s such that the change management procedures are known to the Users. Also the impact of changes to the SLA’s are important to take into account • Service Desk: provided details of the changes that happen such that when incidents occur on a CI due to the changes it can inform the User about the cause. • Service Level Management: Before changes happen, their impact on SLA’s have to be assessed. • Availability: Changes to CI’s should be evaluated against the impact on availability of the services it provides. • Capacity Management: before implementing a change, the impact on the capacity of the CI should be assessed. Also capacity management activities will give raise to RFC’s to ensure proper capacity is available • Security Management: before implementing a change, the impact on the security of the environment should be assessed. IBM Belgium Page 8 of 31
  9. IGS non-Confidential • IT Service Continuity: before implementing a change on a CI, it has to be assessed what the impact is on the IT Service continuity plans. • Release Management: the implementation of new releases happens under the control of change management. 3.6 Release Management • Change Management: Changes may require new releases of HW & SW. The preparation of this before it goes in production is part of Release Management, but bringing it in production happens under control of Change Management • Configuration Management: Creating a new Release should be in close integration with Configuration Management, where the state of all CI’s, whether they are in development/test/validation/production are updated in the CMDB. • Incident/Problem Management: should be provided with the documentation of the new Release and procedures of incident remedial should be provided. • Service Desk: after the roll-out of a new Release, SD should be able to support this new release in terms of requests from Users, and managing of incidents relevant to this new release. • Service Level Management: Implementation of a new release can have impact on the SLA’s. This has to be assessed and remediate in advance. • Capacity Management: The impact of a new Release on the capacity demands of the systems on which it is implemented should be assessed. • IT Service Continuity: the impact to the business by a Release when a failure occurs has to be validated by the IT Service Continuity process. Both when during the rollout as well as during normal operation, should a failure occur, impacting the usage of this Release. IBM Belgium Page 9 of 31
  10. IGS non-Confidential 4 Configuration Management 4.1 Mission Statement Configuration Management provides IT infrastructure control through the identification, registration, monitoring and management of: • All the Configuration Items of the IT infrastructure in scope. • All configurations, versions and their documentation • All changes, errors, service level agreements and history of the components in general. • Relationships between the different components. • Exceptions between configuration records and the real infrastructure. Configuration Management provides a sound basis for other processes like Incident, Problem, Change and Release management by providing accurate information on all CI’s and to the SD function. 4.2 Activities 1. Planning: What is the purpose, scope, objectives, policies, procedures, organizational & technical context for configuration management 2. Identification & registration: selection, identification and labeling of CI’s and the relationships between them. CI’s can be hardware, software, documentation. Also Incident, Problem, Change records can be associated with a CI. Important is the level of detail required. Each CI should have a unique identifier. 3. Control: Only authorized and identifiable CI’s are recorded during their whole lifecycle time. It ensures updates to CI’s are associated with Change Management documents. 4. Status accounting: Reporting of current and historical data associated with each CI. It tracks the state of a CI from one state to another: test, broken, production, withdrawn. 5. Verification and audit: validate data in the CMDB with the situation in the real environment. 6. Reporting: Information about the IT infrastructure should be provided to the other processes. 4.3 Benefits • Provides accurate information on CI’s: supports all other Service Management processes • Controls valuable CI’s: who is responsible for what CI. If a CI is stolen/broke, what should be the configuration of the replacement. • Helps with adherence to licenses: As the CMDB contains an Inventory of all software installed in the environment, it helps with the verification of legality of installed software during audits • Helps financial planning: is helped by interrogating the CMDB to know expected maintenance costs, life expiry dates, replacement costs. IBM Belgium Page 10 of 31
  11. IGS non-Confidential • Changes don’t go undetected: It provides information on all changes in the environment which allows for investigation on other required changes like licensing eg. • Helps contingency planning: The CMDB identifies the CI’s making up a service which helps to know what is required to restore a certain service. • Supports Release Management: When rollouts of new hardware or software happen, information in the CMDB helps to find out what versions should be in the new release, as well as which CI’s are affected. • Improves security by controlling versions: Information on versions of CI’s are in the CMDB so inadvertent changes to other versions becomes more difficult to go unnoticed. • Helps with impact analysis of changes: reduces the risks of implementing Changes in the life environment. • Provides data on trends to Problem Management: Incidents affecting particular CI’s help to find weaknesses in the IT infrastructure. 4.4 Problems • CI’s with too much detail/too little detail: causing too much work or not sufficient control • Implementation without design/analysis • Overambitious schedules: making CM a bottleneck because not enough time to do CM activities is provided • No commitment from management: resulting in lack of control • Perception is too bureaucratic process: resulting in trying to bypass process. • Bypass process: for reasons of speed or malice. • Inefficient process: because of too many manual activities • Unrealistic expectations: CM is not a total solution • Inflexible: Inability to process new requirements • Isolation: implemented with no link to other processes. Less effective, reducing benefits. • Lack of configuration control: users can order HW/SW and install it without passing CM. 4.5 Costs Costs are outweighed by benefits, because CM allows handling large volume of changes keeping quality. CM control reduces risks of viruses, wrong software, fraud, theft … • Staff costs developing & running procedures • HW/SW configuration identification • HW & SW for the CMDB & DSL • Users with access to CM system • Customization of CM tool • Integration with other Service Management tools • Training and education 4.6 Reporting IBM Belgium Page 11 of 31
  12. IGS non-Confidential 4.6.1 Management Reporting Supports Service Management activities. • Configuration audit reports • Number of registered CI’s, versions, categories reports • Repository capacity growth • Change rate of CI’s in CMDB/DSL • Backlog of CM jobs or delays caused by CM • CM staffing issues & overtime • Value of CI’s • Reports on CI’s per location, business unit, service 4.6.2 Key Performance Indicators Provides reports on how effective the process is. • Number of times the configuration is not as authorized • Incidents/Problems tracked to wrong changes • RFC’s that failed due to bad data in CMDB, wrong impact assessment • Cycle time to approve/implement Changes. • Unused licenses • Exception reports from audits 4.7 Roles & Responsibilities 4.7.1 Configuration Manager • Develops & Implements CM policy & standards • Evaluates existing systems and design/implementation new systems • Proposes/agrees scope CM • Organizes communication plan & awareness campaign. • Creates/manages the CI registration procedures • Ensure roles & responsibilities are defined in the CM procedures • Develops CI naming conventions and manages staff to comply with standards • Manages interfaces with other ITIL processes and other business units • Plans & executes population, maintenance of CMDB • Provides reports on management and status issues • Ensures impact analysis is possible by making sure the links between CI’s are implemented. • Ensures Changes update the CMDB • Performs configuration audits and initiates corrective actions • Obtain budget for having required infra and staffing taking growth of the CM process in scope 4.7.2 Configuration librarian • Controls receipt, identification, storage and removal of all CI’s • Provide information on status of CI • Assist CM manager • Create identification scheme for CM libraries and DSL IBM Belgium Page 12 of 31
  13. IGS non-Confidential • Create libraries to hold CI’s • Assist in identification of CI’s • Maintain current status on CI’s • Archive superceded CI’s • Hold master copies • Issues copies for change/review when authorized • Maintain record on all copies issued • Produce configuration status reports • Assist CM audits IBM Belgium Page 13 of 31
  14. IGS non-Confidential 5 Service Desk Function, not process 5.1 Mission Statement The Service Desk intends: • To be the focal point for all service requests from the business Users towards the IT organization (including 3rd party providers), and to manage them within Service Level Agreements • To record and manage the life cycle of incidents, with an emphasis in rapid restoration of service with minimal business impact. • To keep the User up-to-date with the status of his service request. • To provide management information on relevant topics regarding the service, like: o Service deficiencies o Customer training needs o Resource usage o Service performance & targets • To be the window on the level of service offered by the IT organization towards the business. 5.2 Activities • Call handling. • Recording & tracking service requests, including incidents, until closure and verification with the User. • Request/Incident classification and initial support, including forwarding to 2nd level, within Service Level agreements. • Keeping customer informed on request status and priority. • Initiate escalation procedures relative to the SLA. • Coordinating incident handling until resolution with 2nd and 3rd line support • Helping to identify problems by recording all incidents • Providing management information and recommendations for service improvement • Communication of planned changes to the Users. 5.3 Benefits • Improvement in Customer and business service by- and perception of IT organization • Faster response times to standard requests • Customers better informed of progress of requests/incidents/changes • Reduced Incident resolution times • Improved Business & management reporting • 2nd & 3rd level teams can work more organized, less interrupt driven • More efficient use of resources and technology IBM Belgium Page 14 of 31
  15. IGS non-Confidential • More proactive and focused approach to service provision when using automated infrastructure monitoring. 5.4 Problems • Underestimation of scale of work: implementing a Service Desk is a major Change • No real management commitment to SD. Abandoning at first sign of difficulty (Silver Bullet lifecycle). • Working ‘around’ the SD (or the ‘Helpless Desk). • Not enough training for SD staff, or wrong skill set (no communication skills) • No information provided to SD when implementing Changes or Releases, resulting in less good service to the Business. • No alignment with business needs 5.5 Implementation considerations • Business needs & objectives must be clear, as well as Customer requirements. • Management commitment is obtained and budget & resources is made available. • Decide on metrics of effectiveness of the Service Desk. • Investment is made for training Customers, SD staff & support teams. • Decide on the right Service Desk structure (insourced, outsourced, local, remote, virtual, customer built, off-the-shelf). • Get professional support from outside • Consult Customers and End Users • Adopt a phased approach, generating quick wins. Communicate them. • Measure progress. • Acknowledge it is hard work. • Advertise and sell the service 5.6 Service Desk type considerations 5.6.1 Local Service Desk • Service Requests are logged locally • Difficult to provide support services over multiple locations. • Duplication of skills & resources can make it expensive • Requires common operational standards over the different SD’s. • Local skills should be known to other SD’s. • Ensure compatibility of infrastructure • Use common management reporting metrics • Make exchange of Incidents/Requests between SD possible • Try to establish a logically shared database 5.6.2 Central Service Desk • Service Requests are logged centrally • Reduced operational costs • Consolidated management overview • Improved usage of available resources IBM Belgium Page 15 of 31
  16. IGS non-Confidential 5.6.3 Virtual Service Desk • Physical location and associated services of SD are largely immaterial due to advances in telecommunications. • Can be accessed from anywhere in the world • Reduced operational costs • Consolidated management overview • Improved usage of available resources • Restriction is a need of physical local presence of a specialist • Common processes & procedures should be used • Network performance should be right sized • User/Role based authorization views on Requests should be possible 5.7 Reporting • Incident reports by application/support group/customer • Service Desk functioning reports o Telephony pickup times o Telephony talk times o % calls answered within x seconds o time worked on resolving incidents • Workload reports • Daily reports on: o Escalations by support group o Outstanding incidents o Service breaches • Weekly reports on: o Service availability o Incidents that occur the most, require the most work to resolve, take the longest to resolve. o Related incidents requiring creation of problem records o Known Errors and RFC’s o Service breaches o Customer satisfaction o Trends o Workload • Proactive reports on: o Planned changes for the following week o Major incidens/problems/changes of the last week with workarounds/fixes o Customer incidents which were resolved unsatisfied o Recent poorly performing infrastructure. 5.8 Service Desk profile • Customer focused • Articulate and methodical • Trained in interpersonal skills • Understand business objectives • Teamplayer • Emphasize with Users • Act professional IBM Belgium Page 16 of 31
  17. IGS non-Confidential • Accept ownership • Active listener IBM Belgium Page 17 of 31
  18. IGS non-Confidential 6 Incident Management 6.1 Definition and mission statement 6.1.1 Mission statement Incident Management To restore normal service operation, within Service Level Agreement limits, as quickly as possible, after an incident has occurred to that service, and minimize the adverse impact on business operations. 6.1.2 Definitions 1. Incident: is an event, which is not part of the standard operation of a service, and which causes/may cause interruption/reduction in the quality of that service 2. Impact: measures business criticality of the incident. Extent to which an incident leads to degradation of SLA. E.g. number of users that suffer 3. Urgency: measure for required speed of solving an incident 4. Priority: measure of the expected effort to solve the incident and the order in which to solve the incidents. Priority=f(Impact, urgencym). 6.2 Activities • Incident detection and recording: SD, record basic details (time, who, symptoms, CI’s affected) and provide incident number • Classification and initial support: SD, if service request go to SR procedure. Find Service affected. Match against SLA, and assign priority. Also identify technical details like application, version … If possible provide resolution advice. Match against Known Errors, Problems and other Incidents. • Investigation and diagnosis: SD/support group. If SD can’t help functional escalation to 2nd line. If danger of SLA breach, hierarchical escalation. Try to minimize impact by providing degraded service in the meantime. Iterative process. • Resolution and recovery: SD/support group. Can be workaround, or implementation of an RFC. • Incident closure: SD, add details resolution, time spent by whom. Ask for permission to close & close. • Incident ownership, monitoring, tracking and communication: SD 6.3 Benefits • Reduced business impact of incidents by timely resolution • Proactive identification of possible enhancements • Management information related to business focused SLA • Improved monitoring • Improved management information related to aspects of service • Better staff utilization: no more interrupt based handling of incidents • Elimination of lost Incidents & service requests IBM Belgium Page 18 of 31
  19. IGS non-Confidential • Better CMDB information • Better User/Customer satisfaction 6.4 Implementation Considerations & Success factors • IM is part of larger scope. When implementing, consider Service Desk, Problem Management, Configuration Management, Change Management and Release Management. • Start with SD and IM. Together they represent quick wins in Service Management implementation. • Define IM processes and plan creation SD as early as possible (eg. When a new IT service is implemented). • Planning phase is 3-6 months, Implementation 3 mo-1 year (also ongoing activity) • Up to date CMDB is a prerequisite for an efficient IM process. • Resolving incidents is much easier when having a knowledge base of resolved incidents/problems • Paper based systems are not practical • Know what the SLA’s are so that incidents resolution can be targeted against it. 6.5 Problems • No management/staff commitment, hence no resources • Lack of clarity of business needs • Badly defined service goals • Working practices not reviewed or changed • No service levels defined with Customer • Lack of knowledge on resolving incidents • No integration with other processes • Resistant to use the process 6.6 Reporting • Total number of incidents • Mean time to resolve incidents per impact code • % of incidents resolved within response time SLA • average cost per incident • N° of incidents per PC • % of remotely resolved incidents 6.7 Roles & Responsibilities 6.7.1 Incident Manager • Drives the effectiveness of the IM process • Produces Management information • Manages the work of Incident support staff • Makes recommendations for improvement IBM Belgium Page 19 of 31
  20. IGS non-Confidential • Develops and maintain the IM system 6.7.2 Incident-handling support staff • Incident Registration • Routing service requests to support groups when necessary • Initial support and classification • Ownership, monitoring, tracking and communication • Resolution & recovery of incidents not routed to other support groups • Closure of incidents 6.7.3 Second line support • Handling service requests • Incident investigation and diagnosis • Detection of Problems and assigning them to problem management • Resolution & Recovery of assigned Incidents IBM Belgium Page 20 of 31
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