Macromedia Flash 8 (P1)

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Macromedia Flash 8 (P1)

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A lot of books claim that they’re unique, but this one really is. The @ work series leads you directly into building the kinds of practical projects you’re likely to encounter in a professional environment. That promise has appeal because readers have a very clear idea of what they want to build. The projects in this book are definitely in demand. (I know because all these projects have come up more than once in my job.) However, the idea that you can bypass details and learn just the facts is a potential fallacy that threatens the premise of this book series. In fact, I’d argue that there are only a few ways to learn...

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  1. Phillip Kerman Macromedia® Flash 8 ® @work PROJECTS AND TECHNIQUES TO GET THE JOB DONE 800 East 96th Street, Indianapolis, Indiana 46240
  2. Macromedia Flash 8 @work: Projects You Can Use Acquisitions Editor Linda Bump Harrison on the Job Development Editor Copyright  2006 by Phillip Kerman Alice Martina Smith All rights reserved. No part of this book shall be reproduced, stored in a retrieval Managing Editor system, or transmitted by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without written permission from the publisher. No Charlotte Clapp patent liability is assumed with respect to the use of the information contained herein. Although every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this Project Editor book, the publisher and author assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. Dan Knott Nor is any liability assumed for damages resulting from the use of the informa- tion contained herein. Production Editor International Standard Book Number: 0-672-32828-3 Megan Wade Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 2005903522 Indexer Printed in the United States of America Erika Millen First Printing: January 2006 Proofreader 09 08 07 06 4 3 2 1 Brad Engels Trademarks Technical Editors All terms mentioned in this book that are known to be trademarks or service marks have been appropriately capitalized. Sams Publishing cannot attest to the Aria Danika accuracy of this information. Use of a term in this book should not be regarded Larry Drolet as affecting the validity of any trademark or service mark. David Vogeleer Warning and Disclaimer Publishing Coordinator Every effort has been made to make this book as complete and as accurate as Vanessa Evans possible, but no warranty or fitness is implied. The information provided is on an “as is” basis. The author and the publisher shall have neither liability nor Multimedia Developer responsibility to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damages arising Dan Scherf from the information contained in this book or from the use of the programs accompanying it. Book Designer Bulk Sales Gary Adair Sams Publishing offers excellent discounts on this book when ordered in quan- Page Layout tity for bulk purchases or special sales. For more information, please contact Michelle Mitchell U.S. Corporate and Government Sales 1-800-382-3419 corpsales@pearsontechgroup.com For sales outside the United States, please contact International Sales international@pearsoned.com Snowboard image courtesy of www.deepplay.com/sites/m399/.
  3. Contents at a Glance Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Part I: Getting Started 1 Exploring Flash 8 ........................9 2 Producing a Flash Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Part II: Projects 3 Creating a Video with Synchronized Captions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 4 Creating a Portfolio. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 5 Creating an Assessment Quiz . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 6 Saving and Evaluating Quiz Results. . . . . . . 187 7 Creating a PowerPoint-style Slide Presentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 8 Creating a CD-ROM Front End . . . . . . . . . . . . 249 9 Creating Special Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287 10 Building a Photo Share Application . . . . . . . 325 Part III: Appendixes A Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373 B Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 397
  4. Table of Contents Authortime Versus Runtime . . . . . . . . . . 44 An ActionScript 2 Primer. . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Typing Variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Flash’s Classpath . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Introduction 1 The Import Statement and Namespaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Part I: Getting Started Sample Project Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Planning for the End Product 1 Exploring Flash 8 9 First . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 What’s New in Flash 8 ................9 Building a Template . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Expressive Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Understanding Other Project Variations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Video Improvements . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Final Thoughts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Workflow Improvements . . . . . . . 13 Flash Player . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Part II: Projects Flash Professional 8 and Flash Basic 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 ActionScript Additions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 3 Creating a Video with Synchronized Captions 61 A Programming Primer . . . . . . . . 17 About the Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 The flash.filters Package . . . . . . . 21 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 The flash.display.BitmapData Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 @work resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 The flash.geom Package . . . . . . . 22 Planning the Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 The Cue Points and Captions . . . . . . . 62 flash.external.ExternalInterface Cue Point Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Embedded Cue Points Versus The flash.net Package . . . . . . . . . . 26 Separate Text Files . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Final Thoughts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Project: Navigation Cue Points in a .flv File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 2 Producing a Flash Project 29 Creating a New .fla File . . . . . . . . 66 Flash’s File Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Importing the Source Video . . . . 66 Timeline Animation . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Choosing Video Options . . . . . . . 66 Movie Clip Hierarchy . . . . . . . . . . 32 Adding the First Navigation Selecting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Cue Point . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Modular Delivery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Adding More Navigation Cue Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 ActionScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Skinning the Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Library Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Navigating the Video . . . . . . . . . . 70 Disabling Export in First Frame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 iv Macromedia Flash 8 @work: Projects You Can Use on the Job
  5. Project: ActionScript Cue Points for Project: Advanced Captioning Captions in an XML File. . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Preparing to Use the Offline Creating the captionType2.fla Gathering Tool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Loading the Video and Transcript Nesting the Text in a Clip . . . . . . 84 into the Gathering Tool. . . . . . . 71 Modifying the Code to Move Setting Cue Points While the the Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Video Plays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Publishing and Testing . . . . . . . . . 86 Exporting the XML File . . . . . . . . 72 Adding Code for the Project: Basic Caption Display Hide/Reveal Feature . . . . . . . . . . 87 Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Creating the Hide/Reveal Creating a captionType1.fla Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Project: Synchronized Images Adding the Minimum Code . . . . 74 Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Creating the .swf File. . . . . . . . . . . 75 Encoding the Video . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Project: Channeling Cue Points to the Preparing to Gather Cue Caption Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Creating the main.fla File. . . . . . 76 Creating an Animated Creating the CaptionHolder Sequence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Symbol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Gathering the Cue Points . . . . . . 90 Assembling Support Class Implementing the ActionScript Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 in imagesTemplate.fla . . . . . . . . 92 Implementing the Final Code . . 78 Entering the ActionScript in Alternative 1: Making the Video main_coffee.fla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Play Automatically . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Testing main_coffee.fla. . . . . . . . . 94 Alternative 2: Adding a Second Exploring the Support Classes . . . . . . . 94 captionText1.swf That Supports Final Thoughts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Navigation Cue Points . . . . . . . 79 Project: Code for Audio-only 4 Creating a Portfolio 97 Captions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 About the Project. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Capturing the Cue Points . . . . . . 80 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Creating the main_audio.fla @work resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Planning the Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Assembling Support Files . . . . . . 81 Media Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Writing the Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Internal Versus External . . . . . . . 99 Alternative: Using the MediaPlayback Stage Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Communication Gateways . . . 101 Contents v
  6. Project: Media Preparation . . . . . . . . . 102 Project: Alternative Chapter Resizing Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Preparing the Thumbnails . . . . 102 Creating the chapters_hardwired.fla File. . 124 Tagging the Images . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Writing the Code for Project: Main Framework and chapters_hardwired.fla . . . . . . 124 Minimum Support Templates . . . . . 104 Modifying the Main File to Run Creating the Main File . . . . . . . . 105 chapters_hardwired.swf . . . . . 126 Creating a Holder for the Creating the ProgressBar Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 chapters_homemade.fla Entering Image Information . . 105 File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Entering Template Writing the Code for Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 chapters_homemade.fla . . . . . 127 Instantiating the Modifying the Main File to Run PhotoController . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 chapters_homemade.swf . . . . 129 Creating a Simple Display Project: Advanced Thumbnail Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130 Creating a Simple Thumbnails Creating the Clip-based Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Horizontal Thumbnail Coding the Thumbnails Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Entering the Code for Testing It . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 thumbnailsH_clip.fla . . . . . . . . 132 Creating the Simple Chapters Using main_tester_app.swf to Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Test Your Template . . . . . . . . . . 136 Including the Chapters Creating the Template and Testing . . . . . . . 115 thumbnailsH_linkage.fla Project: Advanced Display Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Modifying the Code for the Creating the display_slide.fla thumbnailsH_linkage.fla File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 Writing the Code for Creating the display_slide.fla . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 thumbnailsH_import.fla Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 Modifying the Main File to Run display_slide.swf . . . . . . . . 119 Entering the Code for thumbnailsH_import.fla . . . . 139 Creating the display_fade.fla File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Creating Vertical Thumbnail Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Writing the Code for display_fade.fla . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Project: Externalized Image Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Modifying the Main File to Run display_fade.swf . . . . . . . . 123 Creating and Populating the images.xml File . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 vi Macromedia Flash 8 @work: Projects You Can Use on the Job
  7. Creating the main_external.fla Laying Out the Stage . . . . . . . . . 163 File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Adding the RadioButton Coding the main_external.fla Component. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Changing the ActionScript . . . 163 Exploring the Class Structure . . . . . . . 145 Testing the multipleChoiceSingle Final Thoughts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 Project: Multiple-Choice/Multiple 5 Creating an Assessment Quiz 149 Answer Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 About the Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Creating the Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 multipleChoiceMultiple.fla File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 @work resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Laying Out the Stage . . . . . . . . . 167 Planning the Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 Adding the CheckBox Writing Effective Questions . . . 150 Component. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168 Designing Question Changing the ActionScript . . . 168 Templates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Testing the Client-side Versus multipleChoiceMultiple Server-side . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Planning for Extensibility . . . . . 153 Project: A Hotspot Template . . . . . . . 170 Project: Quiz Content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Creating the hotSpot.fla File . . 171 Studying the XML Format . . . . 155 Laying Out the Stage . . . . . . . . . 171 Writing Sample Content for Modifying the File’s multipleChoiceSingle . . . . . . . . 155 Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Writing Sample Content for Changing the ActionScript . . . 173 multipleChoiceMultiple . . . . . 156 Testing the hotSpot Writing Sample Content for Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176 hotSpot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Project: Drag-and-Drop Template . . 177 Writing Sample Content for dragAndDrop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 Creating the dragAndDrop.fla File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Project: Starter Template . . . . . . . . . . . 158 Laying Out the Stage . . . . . . . . . 177 Creating the Starter File . . . . . . 159 Changing the ActionScript . . . 177 Placing Text on the Stage . . . . . 159 Testing the dragAndDrop Entering Skeleton Code . . . . . . . 159 Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Publishing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 Project: Results Template . . . . . . . . . . . 179 Modifying the quiz.xml File . . 161 Creating the results.fla File . . . 180 Testing the Quiz Engine. . . . . . . 162 Laying Out the Stage . . . . . . . . . 180 Project: Multiple-Choice/Single Building a Simple Results Answer Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Creating the Testing the Simple Results multipleChoiceSingle.fla Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181 File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Contents vii
  8. Building an Advanced Results Project: Advanced All-Flash Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182 Login . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 Testing the Advanced Results Creating the Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 login_advanced.fla File . . . . . 203 Exploring the Class Structure . . . . . . . 184 Adding Methods to the Final Thoughts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185 urls.xml File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203 Creating Static XML Files in 6 Saving and Evaluating Quiz Results 187 Lieu of Live Server-side Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 About the Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Creating the Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 login_advanced_html.html File @work resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 and Adding the FlashVars . . . 205 Planning the Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 Applying the ActionScript . . . . 206 Benefits of Application Project: APIs for the Admin Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188 Assessment Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207 Keeping Login Separate . . . . . . . 188 Defining How to Get Quiz Login Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189 Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 208 Ascertaining Variable Values Defining How Quiz Results from Inside quiz.swf . . . . . . . . . 189 Are Saved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 Chapter Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 190 Defining How Users Can Log Project: External Paths to In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Server-side Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 Providing a Way to Retrieve Adding Methods to the All the quizIDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 urls.xml File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 192 Defining an API to Retrieve Specifying the Location of the All userIDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 urls.xml File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193 Defining an API to Retrieve Project: Traditional Login . . . . . . . . . . 194 All quizIDs for One userID . . 211 Adding FlashVars to Defining an API to Retrieve quiz.html . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 All Scores for a Quiz . . . . . . . . . 211 Adding the debug Switch in Defining an API to Retrieve quiz.fla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195 Detailed Quiz Results . . . . . . . . 212 Testing It . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197 Project: API Tester . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 213 Project: Simple All-Flash Login. . . . . 198 Project: Simple Admin Tool . . . . . . . . 214 Creating the login_simple.fla Using the Full-featured Admin File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198 Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215 Coding It . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199 Final Thoughts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 Creating the quiz_html_simple.html File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 Publishing and Testing . . . . . . . 200 viii Macromedia Flash 8 @work: Projects You Can Use on the Job
  9. 7 Creating a PowerPoint-style Slide Embedding the Fonts . . . . . . . . . 234 Presentation 217 Writing the Code for the About the Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 pullquote.swf Template. . . . . . 235 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 Project: Bullet List Template. . . . . . . . 238 @work resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 Designing the XML Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 238 Planning the Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Adding the Styles to the CSS Understanding the Presentation Document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 218 Embedding the Fonts . . . . . . . . . 239 Understanding the Template Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219 Writing the Template Code . . . 240 Formatting the Presentation Project: Slideshow Distribution . . . . . 244 Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 220 Choosing Distribution Designing Templates . . . . . . . . . . 221 Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 Effective Transitions. . . . . . . . . . . 222 Creating a Projector . . . . . . . . . . 245 Deployment Options . . . . . . . . . . 222 Collecting the Necessary Distribution Files . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 The Point of a Presentation . . . 222 Exploring the Support Classes . . . . . . 246 Project: Simple Photo Caption Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Final Thoughts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 Setting Up the Document . . . . . 223 Laying Out the Photo 8 Creating a CD-ROM Front End 249 Holder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 About the Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249 Laying Out the Caption Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249 Text . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 @work resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249 Adding the Customized Planning the Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 ActionScript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 Why Not Create a Flash Editing the XML and Testing Projector? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 250 the Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 Designing a Workable and Project: Advanced Before-and-After Organized File Structure . . . . . 251 Photo Template. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 Making Custom Icons . . . . . . . . 252 Creating the Document and Autorun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 252 Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 Full Screen, Title Bars, and Writing the Code to Support Quitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 Stepping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227 Decoupling the Front End, Data, Writing the XML for This and System-level Calls . . . . . . 254 Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231 Pieces You’ll Build in This Project: CSS Support in a Pull Quote Chapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232 Creating the CSS Styles . . . . . . . 233 Designing the Slide Node . . . . . 233 Contents ix
  10. Project: XML Document That Adding Code to Respond to Identifies All Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 User Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277 Creating the Skeleton XML Project: Third-party Product File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 279 Adding and Modifying the Copying the Support Files . . . . 280 Item.as Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 256 Instantiating the ThirdParty.as Adding and Modifying the Class. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280 Section.as Class . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 Triggering the ThirdParty Class’s Copying the Data Folders . . . . . 259 openFile() and doSaveAs() Project: The main.fla File . . . . . . . . . . 259 Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 Adding the SectionMaker.as Project: Stub Application . . . . . . . . . . . 282 and utils.as Class Files . . . . . . 259 Preparing the File Structure . . . 283 Creating the main.fla File . . . . 260 Creating the stub.fla File . . . . . 283 Writing the Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . 260 Building the Projector . . . . . . . . . 283 Project: Section Templates. . . . . . . . . . 262 Project: Auto-play Functionality . . . 284 Assembling the section_simple.fla Creating the autorun.inf File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 263 File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 Writing the Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . 264 Copying the Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 Testing the Simple Exploring the Class Structure . . . . . . . 285 Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267 Final Thoughts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 286 Creating the section_animated.swf 9 Creating Special Effects 287 Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 268 About the Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287 Modifying the Code in Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287 section_animated.fla . . . . . . . . 269 @work resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287 Modifying main.fla to Point to section_animate.swf . . . . . . . . . 270 Planning the Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288 Designing the section_static.swf Think About Impressions, Not Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271 Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288 Building the section_static.swf Start with the End in Mind . . . 288 Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271 Timeline Versus Scripted Writing the Code for the Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288 section_static.fla File . . . . . . . . 273 Justify Everything . . . . . . . . . . . . . 289 Modifying main.fla to Point to Project: Continuous Loop . . . . . . . . . . 289 section_static.swf . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 Creating One Cycle . . . . . . . . . . . 289 Project: Listeners in the main.fla Matching the End with the File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 Beginning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 290 Adding User Interface Elements Making the Animation . . . . . . . 291 to main.fla . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 Touching Up the Writing ActionScript That Animation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292 Listens for User Events . . . . . . . 277 x Macromedia Flash 8 @work: Projects You Can Use on the Job
  11. Project: Jitter Effect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293 Tracing While the Mouse Is Drawing the Base Elements . . . 293 Down . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306 Adding the Jitter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 293 Making Tracers Appear in Specific Parts of the Project: Magnifier Lens Effect . . . . . . 294 Animation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 Creating the Large Movie Project: VU Meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 294 Planning Your VU Meters . . . . . 308 Creating the Small Movie Clip . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295 Creating the Digital VU Meter Symbol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 308 Adding the Mask . . . . . . . . . . . . . 295 Copying the Support Files . . . . 309 Animating the Mask . . . . . . . . . . 296 Building a Test Bed Adjusting the Motion . . . . . . . . . 296 Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 Adding a Layer for the Entering Starter Code . . . . . . . . . 310 Reflection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296 Making an Analog Version . . . 312 Project: Blends and Filters . . . . . . . . . . 297 Project: DualFilter Classes . . . . . . . . . . 312 Using the Layer Blend for Accurate Transparency . . . . . . 297 Selecting the Start and End Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314 Making a Spotlight Effect Using the Alpha Blend . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298 Creating Two Filter Instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 314 Making a Black-and-White Photo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299 Copying the Support Files . . . . 315 Making a Sepia-toned Photo . 299 Passing a Start and End BlurFilter to the DualBlurFilter Class . . 315 Project: Matrixes for the ColorMatrixFilter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 300 Combining Filter Effects . . . . . . 316 Making a Photograph Black Using the WavyFilter Class . . . 316 and White Using Code . . . . . . 300 Project: Offline ListAnim Filter Making a Photograph Sepia Class. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318 Using Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301 Creating the Offline Project: Film Dirt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 301 Animation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320 Copying the Required Files . . . 302 Copying the Support Files . . . . 320 Creating the Dirt. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 302 Running the FilterMonitor.as Class to Gather the Filter Entering Simple Code . . . . . . . . . 303 Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320 Setting Up a File to Put Dirt on Creating the Online Version . . 321 a Video . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 Final Thoughts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322 Entering Code to Show Dirt While Video Plays . . . . . . . . . . . 304 10 Building a Photo Share Application 325 Project: Tracers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 About the Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325 Creating an Animation . . . . . . . 305 Prerequisites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325 Copying the Support Files . . . . 306 @work resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325 Contents xi
  12. Planning the Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326 Exploring the getImages.xml Features for This Project . . . . . . 326 Schema . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360 Additional Tags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 328 Creating the zoom_document_ version.swf File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 360 Limits of the FileReference Class. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329 Testing the PDF Download Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 363 Uploading and Downloading from a Server Only . . . . . . . . . . 330 Project: List View for the Image Filenames . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 363 Project: Work Environment . . . . . . . . 331 Creating Another New Working Setting Up the Static XML Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364 Files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 331 Creating a New Thumbnail Setting Up a Starter Folder of Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 364 Images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332 Applying the ActionScript to Copying the Support Files . . . . 333 the Thumbnail Screen . . . . . . . 365 Project: Basic Photo Share Project . . 333 Analyzing the ActionScript . . . 365 Creating the Main File . . . . . . . . 334 Creating a New Main File . . . . 367 Creating the selection.swf Testing the Thumbnail List Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335 Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 367 Creating the upload.swf Exploring the Class Structure . . . . . . . 368 Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 338 Final Thoughts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 369 Assembling the thumbnail.swf Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 341 Applying the Code for Part III: Appendixes thumbnail.swf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 343 Creating the zoom.swf A Resources 373 Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 347 Configuration Folders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 373 Creating the edit.swf Macromedia Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375 Template . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 351 Flash Uninstaller . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375 Testing It . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 353 Player Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375 Project: No Upload and Editing Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356 Player Version. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375 Modifying the Selection LiveDocs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 375 Screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 356 Macromedia Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Modifying the Zoom Screen . . 357 Community Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Modifying the Main Screen . . . 357 Full as a Goog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Project: A Version That Downloads Community MX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 .pdf Documents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 358 Chatty Fig. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Creating a New Working Open Source Flash . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 359 Flashkit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Creating a New main.fla . . . . . 359 xii Macromedia Flash 8 @work: Projects You Can Use on the Job
  13. We’re Here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Ultrashock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 376 Third-Party Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 ActionScript Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . 377 Swift 3D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 Toon Boom Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 Flix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 Sorenson Media . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 Techsmith’s Camtasia. . . . . . . . . 377 Zoomify . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 377 SWF Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378 M Projector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378 Zinc V2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378 Screenweaver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378 Content Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378 Moving Image Internet Archive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 378 B Components 379 Using V2 Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 Simple Listener . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 379 Using a Custom Object As a Listener . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 382 Using mx.utils.Delegate . . . . . . 383 Instantiating Components Dynamically . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384 Dispatching Events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 384 Where to Go from Here . . . . . . . . . . . . . 386 Glossary 387 Index 397 Contents xiii
  14. About the Author Phillip Kerman has been teaching Flash since version 3 and writing books since version 5. He also does contract development. His early experiences in photography have a direct correlation to his job today. The feeling he gets when seeing a project he assembles come to life is the same as watching a photograph develop in the darkroom. Although he understands that great projects involve the work of many dedicated people, he’s not shy to point out that he was the primary programmer for such familiar projects as the original Millennium Three site (archived at deepplay.com/sites/ m399/), a real-time Flash auction that consistently sells over $5 million in cattle during a typical 90-minute sale (stampedecattle.com), the site for the “other” cool office chair (www.allsteeloffice.com/number19/movie.asp), and the Witness to History kiosk featured in the Communication Arts 11th Annual Interactive Exhibition (commarts.com/ca/interac- tive/cai05/36_ia05.html). The short story of Phillip’s rise from mere mortal to being in charge of everything at phillipkerman.com LLC goes like this: . Student photographer for Sunset High School’s newspaper and yearbook . Rode his bicycle from Portland, Oregon, to go to college in Rochester, New York (and got all 2 years’ worth of physical education credits waived in the process) . Graduated from the Rochester Institute of Technology with a bachelor of science in imaging and photographic technology . Worked for Sinar Bron, Inc., selling premier professional photographic equipment . Worked for The Human Element, Inc., doing Authorware (version 1) development . Drove back to Portland, Oregon, where he has been doing contract work for more than 10 years Dedication This book is dedicated to my good friend of 25 years, Graham Stewart Clark (1964–2005). Graham was a brilliant, inspiring, and strong human being who fought and lost a silent battle against overwhelming unhappiness. May his suicide persuade us of the importance of seeking help for ourselves and those we love. For my friend, a city planner who dreamed of creating a more livable city, will you the reader consider giving your car a rest once in a while and instead walk, ride a bike, or take public transportation?
  15. Acknowledgments It’s fair to say this book would be much different if no one helped me write it. In fact, I suspect it would be bad. General acknowledgements, like those that follow, help reduce the chances of leaving anyone out. The people at Macromedia are always accessible and responsive. In the case of the Flash 8 team, though, they outdid themselves with a great product and a super-effective beta process. I’ve tried listing specific Macromedians in my other books’ acknowledgements and, even when the list contains more than 100 people, I inevitably forget someone (so I’m not going to risk that here). The folks at Sams Publishing are also super-dedicated and professional. For better or worse, they’re unlike any of my other clients. They really approach a book as a partnership in which everyone can help make it better. Not once have I felt that a negotiation (big or small) was resolved unfairly. If you’ve ever tried teaching, you won’t be surprised to hear me acknowledge all the students who have taught me something. You tend to find out what you don’t know very quickly when you teach. And, as is true with many other challenges, there is always room to improve your teaching ability. In recent years, I’ve learned from students and other teachers at Cleveland High School, Northwest Academy, Pacific Northwest College of Art, Portland Community College, and West Linn High School. There are also people who provided specific help with certain portions of the book. Burak Kalayci (www.buraks.com)—whose ActionScript Viewer (ASV) and Captionate products are enough to deserve special recognition—provided valuable insights into how to design the projects for Chapter 3, “Creating a Video with Synchronized Captions.” He also graciously reviewed some other portions of the book. A former student, Jhon Adams (www.evilpump- kin.com), created the PHP components for Chapter 6, “Saving and Evaluating Quiz Results,” and Chapter 10, “Building a Photo Share Application.” My sister, Deborah Kerman, provided expert advice on the question-writing tips in Chapter 5, “Creating an Assessment Quiz.” Jesse Warden (www.jessewarden.com) also graciously reviewed a chapter early on, which helped me to map out other projects. Larry Drolet, Scott Huber, Doug Scamahorn, and David Vogeleer all tested several chapters’ functionality. The prolific Flash author Robert Reinhardt (www.themakers.com) gave me lots of general feedback over the weeks (well, months) it took me to write this book. Finally, I’ve seen some authors acknowledge musical artists (presumably those who influ- enced the author while writing). Instead, let me mention the killer stereo accessory called squeezebox (from www.slimdevices.com) that gave me an easy way to listen to music while writing.
  16. We Want to Hear from You! As the reader of this book, you are our most important critic and commentator. We value your opinion and want to know what we’re doing right, what we could do better, what areas you’d like to see us publish in, and any other words of wisdom you’re willing to pass our way. You can email or write me directly to let me know what you did or didn’t like about this book—as well as what we can do to make our books stronger. Please note that I cannot help you with technical problems related to the topic of this book, and that due to the high volume of mail I receive, I might not be able to reply to every message. When you write, please be sure to include this book’s title and author as well as your name and phone or email address. I will carefully review your comments and share them with the author and editors who worked on the book. Email: graphics@samspublishing.com Mail: Mark Taber Associate Publisher Sams Publishing 800 East 96th Street Indianapolis, IN 46240 USA Reader Services For more information about this book or another Sams Publishing title, visit our website at www.samspublishing.com. Type the ISBN (excluding hyphens) or the title of a book in the Search field to find the page you’re looking for.
  17. Introduction A lot of books claim that they’re unique, but this one really is. The @ work series leads you directly into building the kinds of practical projects you’re likely to encounter in a profes- sional environment. That promise has appeal because readers have a very clear idea of what they want to build. The projects in this book are definitely in demand. (I know because all these projects have come up more than once in my job.) However, the idea that you can bypass details and learn just the facts is a potential fallacy that threatens the premise of this book series. In fact, I’d argue that there are only a few ways to learn difficult subjects and, unfortunately, none are “quick and easy.” In case you think I’m a walking contradic- tion, let me explain how this book can be to the point without being so “lite” that the projects aren’t useful. It might sound terrible, but in this book you won’t learn the Flash skills needed to build complex projects. But the projects you’ll build aren’t lightweight either. Rather, for each chapter, I’ve built adaptable support files that serve as engines that display your content. What you’ll learn here is how to adapt and extend these engines for your projects. (Of course, you’ll be able to investigate the files to see how I built them, but the focus is on using these files.) These engines are not merely templates that you fill with your own content, switch a few colors, and then put your logo on. In fact, the engines are invisible. For example, when you add captions to a video (in Chapter 3,
  18. “Creating a Video with Synchronized explain every step in detail, but I also know Captions”), you create the text display and that it’s easy to get lost if you’ve never supply the actual captions. The engine touched Flash. The target audience for this handles the bulk of the timing and program- book is an accomplished novice or intermedi- ming tasks and then simply sends a message ate Flash user. A lot of people learn how to to your display when a new caption should create animations and projects with simple appear. Here’s a wild analogy to illustrate interactivity but then hit a wall that blocks how it works: Think of how you’re insulated them from tackling advanced projects. I’m from the details involving exactly how your writing for the reader who’s at that wall but car works. You only have to interface with who wants to learn only how to get over the the steering wheel, gas pedal, and brakes. wall at hand—the projects at hand in your Now imagine if your car had modular work today. components enabling you to change and This book is not a guide to Object Oriented modify everything in the interior. As long as Programming (OOP). Although all the code you always included some sort of steering in my engines uses OOP as well as wheel, gas pedal, and brakes, the whole ActionScript 2 (AS2), you can build the proj- system would work. ects using any style you want: You can do I know the engines in this book work because everything in the Flash timeline or make I’ve already seen them customized and your own class files (that is, use AS2). You extended by several book reviewers. don’t need any AS2 experience. The only Furthermore, after writing the chapters, I AS2-specific task you must complete is to began creating more and more templates copy .as files into the folders in which you’re that work within the engines (and you building the projects. All my source files are can download these from www. open for your perusal (which, for me, is a lot samspublishing.com). I also expect readers like appearing in public in my underwear— will develop even more templates and email not that I’ve done that). I’m not a hack them to me to share. (Making templates for programmer by any means, but don’t expect the engines is easy; that’s one of the main the source files to be the most elegant exam- things you’ll be doing in this book.) ples of OOP you’ve ever seen. They will, of course, work for the task at hand and won’t Let me conclude with a few contrasting notes have a negative impact on performance. about what this book is and isn’t, and who it’s written for. This book is appropriate for a Every project in this book assumes you’re wide range of readers; some of you will delivering content to Flash Player 8. I simply replace a few colors and add your suppose that’s not totally practical because logo to the finished files I supply, while many clients don’t want to require their users others will create very advanced templates to have the latest version of the Flash plug-in that adapt and extend my engines. You’ll until after it has been out a while. (However, definitely get a lot more out of the book if in Chapter 1, “Exploring Flash 8,” I give you you’re familiar enough with Flash that evidence for why the adoption rate is likely you’re not fighting with its interface. I to occur quickly with Flash Player 8.) The reason the projects use features that require 2 Macromedia Flash 8 @work: Projects You Can Use on the Job
  19. Flash Player 8 is not arbitrary. In every case, wanted to insert an additional feature I I’m embracing new features that either didn’t think of. In such cases, feel free to provide results previously unavailable or email me at work@phillipkerman.com, and I because they make the development of the might be motivated to actually build it—at project much easier. worst, I can point you in the right direction to help you build it yourself. The engines in this book are not Flash components. You won’t receive a library of advanced UI components. Nor are the engines standalone applications. However, I Organization of This Book did build a few helper applications that This book is divided into three parts: turned out very cool. For example, one tool lets you add cue points to video and audio in . Part I, “Getting Started,” introduces a very natural manner during video play- Flash 8 and provides your basic train- back. I should also add that you won’t find a ing for building projects in Flash. The bunch of clipart in the files I’ve made avail- two chapters in this part are really the able for you to download from the accompa- prerequisites for the rest of the book; nying CD-ROM. I hope I don’t see a real don’t skip them. project in which a reader uses my prototype . Part II, “Projects,” contains a variety of graphics. Not that I mind, but they’re pretty practical projects that are sure to come rough. up in some form during your Flash You are welcome to use any of the code from career. They’re not in any particular this book in your real projects. You have no order and have little overlap or cross further obligation to me and, similarly, referencing. Therefore, you can read there’s no stated or implied guarantee that I them in any order. For example, if you will support the files (beyond maintaining need to add captions to a video, start the book errata). My point is simply that the with Chapter 3, “Creating a Video with projects really are ready for primetime and I Synchronized Captions.” If you need to expect you to use them. make a PowerPoint-like presentation, jump directly to Chapter 7, “Creating a Finally, for the third time, I’ll reiterate that PowerPoint-style Slide Presentation.” In the projects are not lightweight. While I was each chapter you’ll start by building a writing them, I refused to build something basic working version of the project and that wasn’t representative of a real project then go on to add enhancements and (and therefore was impractical). I’ve yet to variations as you wish. For example, persuade a client that we should remove a you’ll create a quiz in Chapter 5, useful feature just because I found it hard to “Creating an Assessment Quiz,” and build, so I didn’t use excuses here either. have the opportunity to add all kinds Having said that, it’s possible you will want a of question types (such as multiple- specialty feature added to one of the engines. choice and drag-and-drop). The chap- Realize that you’ll learn how to make pretty ters in this portion of the book contain significant changes to the projects through- the projects you can use on the job. out this book. I wouldn’t be surprised if you Introduction 3
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