Marketing Manager Course - Chapter 13

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Marketing Manager Course - Chapter 13

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  1. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  2. Chapter 13 Leadership McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  3. Learning Objectives After reading this chapter, you should be able to: Distinguish between management and leadership. Recognize how leaders use different power bases to exercise influence. Differentiate effective from ineffective leaders. Identify and apply the major theories of leadership. Identify organizational characteristics that determine the need for and importance of leadership. Strengthen the values and ethics of an organization through leadership. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  4. What Makes A Leader Effective? Ability to influence other people Has a vision – ideas or objectives that clarify to others where they should be headed “Sells” the vision by articulating it in a compelling and persuasive manner Encourages followers to establish appropriate implementation activities to support the accomplishment of the vision McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  5. Compare Leadershi p M anagem ent Contrast McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  6. Practices Associated with Leadership by Managers Planning and organizing Planning and organizing Supporting Supporting Problem solving Problem solving Managing conflict and Managing conflict and Clarifying Clarifying team building team building Informing Informing Networking Networking Monitoring Monitoring Delegating Delegating Motivating Motivating Developing and mentoring Developing and mentoring Consulting Consulting Rewarding Rewarding Recognizing Recognizing McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  7. Power C oerci ve Pow er R ew ard Legii at tm e Pow er Pow er ExpertPow er R eferent Pow er McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  8. Leadership: Traditional Explanations Person-based Theori es SiuatonalTheori t i es Di spersed Theori es Exchange Theori es McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  9. Trait Theory “Can-Do” “Can-Do” Desire Desire Attitude Attitude to Lead to Lead Self- Self- Honesty Honesty Confidence Confidence and Integrity and Integrity Intelligence Ambition Ambition Intelligence and Energy and Energy McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  10. Behavioral Theories I tatng St nii i ructure O hi St e o at C onsi deraton i Em pl oyee- ri aton oyee- ent i O U niversiy of t M i gan chi Producton- ri aton i O ent i McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  11. The Managerial Grid 1 (1,9) (9,9) 2 3 Concern for People 4 5 (5,5) 6 7 8 9 (1,1) (9,1) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Concern for Production McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  12. Findings of the Fiedler Model Good Performance Relationship-Oriented Task-Oriented Poor Favorable Moderate Unfavorable Category I II III IV V VI VII VIII • Leader-Member Good Good Good Good Poor Poor Poor Poor Relations • Task Structure High High Low High High High Low Low • Position Power Strong Weak Strong Weak Strong Weak Strong Weak McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  13. The Path-Goal Framework Environmental Environmental Contingencies Contingencies Leader Leader Outcomes Outcomes Behavior Behavior Subordinate Subordinate Contingencies Contingencies McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  14. Dispersed Theories Substitute Leadership:attempts to identify workplace characteristics that can substitute for leadership or neutralize efforts made by a leader Self-Leadership: leadership that stresses the individual responsibility of employees to develop their own work priorities aligned with organizational goals McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  15. Characteristics of Traditional and Self-Managing Behaviors: Traditional Leader Behaviors Self-Managing Leader Behaviors Organization – Structures own and subordinates Encourages self-reward work Domination – Restricts or limits the discretion of Encourages self-observation individuals or groups Production – Sets standards for task performance Encourages self-goal setting Recognition – Expresses approval or disapproval Encourages self-criticism of behavior Integration – Promotes group cohesion and Encourages self-rehearsal reduces group conflict Communication – Provides, seeks, and Acts as a role model by exhibiting appropriate exchanges information with group members behavior Fosters the development of a culture that nourishes and supports self-leadership McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  16. Exchange Theories Transactional Leadership: leaders who use legitimate, coercive, or reward powers to elicit obedience and attempt to instill in followers the ability to question standard modes of operation Transformational Leadership: leaders who revitalize organizations by instilling in followers the ability to question standard modes of operation Authentic leadership: An approach that emphasizes the importance of a positive directive force, particularly in an environment of increasing complexity, change, and uncertainty McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  17. Characteristics of Transactional and Transformational Leaders Transactional Leader Transactional Leader Transformational Leader Transformational Leader Contingent reward Contingent reward Charisma Charisma Management by exception Management by exception Inspiration Inspiration (active) (active) Intellectual stimulation Intellectual stimulation Management by exception Management by exception Individualized consideration Individualized consideration (passive) (passive) Laissez-Faire Laissez-Faire McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  18. Applications of Management Perspectives—For the Manager Managers should identify the theories that best fit them and their situations: Some situations call for a strong person to guide the organization through change Other situations may call for the dispersed leadership Uncertainties and difficult times may best match authentic leadership Both management and leadership skills can be positive for employees and the organization; they will also bode well for your own career. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  19. Applications of Management Perspectives—For Managing Teams Effective teams have a shared vision and a common purpose that comes from leaders. Leadership may come from inside the team itself. The increasing prevalence of empowerment and self-leadership underscores the importance of team members understanding and developing leadership skills. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  20. Applications of Management Perspectives—For Individuals Employees are more likely to succeed if they can manage themselves without relying on others to motivate them and define their tasks. Employees can become self-leaders by: Finding opportunities in their work environment. Showing initiative. Encouraging others to do their best. Generating enthusiasm for the tasks at hand. Individuals can apply these leadership theories to the work environments and improve performance, as well as their potential for advancement. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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