Marketing Manager Course - Chapter 14

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Marketing Manager Course - Chapter 14

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  1. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  2. Chapter 14 Managing Teams McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  3. Learning Objectives After reading this chapter, you should be able to: Translate the benefits teams provide into competitive advantages in the market. Manage the different types of teams – self-managed, parallel, project, and virtual. Track the stages of team development that occur over the life of a project and help the team perform effectively. Recognize the key roles that team members must play to ensure high performance. Develop skills to detect and control team performance problems. Manage team conflict through negotiation. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  4. As U.S. companies employ more knowledge workers, they are increasingly using teams to fully engage and empower workers to utilize their knowledge for the company’s advantage. More work is being performed in teams. The ability to manage teams has become an important skill for managers and employees. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  5. Team A team is a small number of people with complementary skills who are committed to: a common purpose, a set of performance goals, an approach for which they hold themselves mutually accountable. Team members interact with each other on a regular basis. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  6. Team (continued) Teams share performance goals. Individuals on a team are mutually responsible for end results. The team environment produces synergy. This allows individuals to blend complementary skills and talents to produce a product that is more valuable than the sum of the individual contributions. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  7. Work Group Members of a work group are held accountable for their individual work. They are not responsible for the output of the entire group. A work group is more likely to have a strong, directive leader who seeks input from group members and then delegates work to various individuals to complete. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  8. Not All Groups Are Teams (1 of 2) Characteristic Working Group Team Leadership Strong, clearly focused leader Shared leadership roles Accountability Individual Individual and mutual Purpose Same as the broader Team purpose that the team itself organization mission delivers Work Products Individual Collective McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  9. Not All Groups Are Teams (2 of 2) Characteristic Working Group Team Meeting Style Efficient Open-ended discussion, active problem-solving Performance Indirectly, by its influence on Directly, by collective work Measurement others products Decision-making Discusses, decides, and Discusses, decides, and does real Process delegates work together McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  10. Skills for Managing Teams Conflict Management Skills Skills for Handling Negotiation Skills Difficult Team Members McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  11. The Benefits of Teams C ost and s Q ualt iy Productviy i t I provem ent m s Speed Innovaton i McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  12. Types of Teams Sel- anaged fM Proj Team s ect Team s ParalelTeam s l Vi ualTeam s rt McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  13. Team Characteristics Sel- anaged fm High Proj Team ect Team Time Commitment Team Member Proj Team ect ParalelTeam l Low ParalelTeam l Vi ualTeam rt Low High Duration of Team McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  14. Self-Managed Teams (SMT) Responsible for producing an entire product, component, or service. Formalized as part of the organization structure. Employees are assigned to it on a full-time basis, and its duration is long. Utilize employees whose jobs are similar but who may have different levels of skill. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  15. Self-Managed Teams (continued) Team members combine their skills to produce an important organizational outcome. Have authority to make many decisions that traditionally have been made by supervisors or managers. Members need a variety of skills: Technical skills Management skills Interpersonal Skills McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  16. Project Teams Work on a specific project that has a beginning and an end. Team members work full-time until the project is completed. Composed of members from different functions or different technical disciplines. Key criterion for judging team performance is meeting or exceeding milestone deadlines. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  17. Parallel Teams Sometimes called problem-solving teams or special- purpose teams. Focus on a problem or issue that requires only part-time commitment from team members. Employee spends a few hours per week with the parallel team, and the remainder of the time on his/her regular job. When the problem is solved the team is disbanded. Can be of short or long duration. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  18. Virtual Teams Take advantage of interactive computer technologies to enable distant people to work together. Require only a part-time commitment. Make it possible for companies to cross organizational boundaries: Linking customers, suppliers, and business partners to improve the quality and increase the speed with which a new product or service is brought to the market. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  19. Managing Team Performance Team performance requires vigilant management. Factors that need to be taken into account in managing effective team performance are: The stages of team development. The roles of team members and leaders. Team member behaviors. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  20. Stages of Team Development 1.Form i ng 2.Storm i ng 3.N orm i ng 4.Perform i ng 5.A dj ourni ng McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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