Marketing Manager Course - Chapter 15

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Marketing Manager Course - Chapter 15

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  1. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  2. Chapter 15 Managing Communication McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  3. Learning Objectives After reading this chapter, you should be able to: Understand the process of communication. Eliminate barriers that distort the meaning of information. Analyze the basic patterns of organizational communication. Develop the skills of organizing and running effective meetings. Master electronic forms of communication such as e-mail and know when to use them. Work with an organization’s informal communication. Improve assertive communication, presentation, nonverbal, and listening skills. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  4. The Process of Communication Communication is a process that involves the transmission of meaningful information from one party to another through the use of shared symbols. Communication is successful when meaning is understood. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  5. The Process of Communication (continued) Two forms of information are sent and received in communication: Facts – bits of information that can be objectively measured or described. Feelings – an individual’s emotional responses to decisions made or actions taken by other people. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  6. Skills for Managing Communication A ssertve i C om m uni i Skil caton ls Present i Skil aton ls Li eni Skil st ng ls N onverbal C om m uni i Skil caton ls McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  7. The Communication Process C om m uni i caton Noise C hannel Sender R ecei ver (encodes m essage) (decodes m essage) Feedback Noise McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  8. The Communication Process: Feedback Feedback allows the sender to clarify the message if its true meaning is not received. Two-way Communications – communication channels that provide for feedback. One-way Communications – communication channels that provide no opportunity for feedback. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  9. The Communication Process: Barriers to Effective Communication Barriers can disrupt the accurate transmission of information. These barriers take different forms: Sender barrier Encoding barrier Communication channel barrier Decoding barrier Receiver barrier Feedback barrier Noise barrier Perception barrier McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  10. Patterns of Organizational Communications Communications in organizations can be complex. Possible barriers to communication includes: Differences in employee status and power Diversity Differences in interests McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  11. Patterns of Organizational Communications Downward Communication Upward Communication Horizontal Communication McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  12. Constructive Feedback Focus your feedback on specific behaviors that were successful or that were unsuccessful. Keep personality traits out of your feedback by focusing on what rather than who. Investigate whether the employee had control over the results before giving feedback about unsuccessful behaviors. Feedback should be given as soon as possible. Ensure privacy when giving feedback about negative behaviors. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  13. Communication Channels Ranked by Information Richness Richest Channel Leanest Channel Physical Interactive Personal static Impersonal static presence (face- channels channels (memos, channels (fliers, to-face, (telephone, letters, reports bulletins, meetings) electronic media, tailored to generalized voice mail, e-mail) receiver) reports) Best for non- Best for routine, routine, clear, simple ambiguous, messages difficult messages McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  14. Managing Organizational Communications Face-to-Face Electronic Communication Communication Written Informal Communication Communication McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  15. Steps you can take to make meetings more productive Ask yourself if it’s important even to schedule a meeting. Schedule the meeting for an appropriate place. Create an agenda for the meeting and distribute it ahead of time. Establish rules for participation. Follow the agenda’s time limits for each topic. Leave some open time for topics not on the agenda. End the meeting with a plan of action. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  16. Informal Communication Also called the grapevine – informal communication that takes place at the workplace. can be about promotions and other personnel decisions can be about company events (new products, downsizing) must be managed so that negative rumors do not hurt morale Management by Wandering Around (MBWA) – dropping in unannounced for spontaneous conversations builds levels of trust stops harmful rumors McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  17. Assertive Communication Skills Assertive communication skills—communicate in ways that meet one’s own needs while at the same time respecting the needs and rights of others Several less effective styles people tend to use because they are indirect or not mindful of needs: Passive communication – an individual does not let others know directly what he or she wants or needs. Aggressive communication – a forceful approach that expresses dominance or anger. Passive-aggressive communication – avoids giving direct responses but rather tries to “get even” with others. McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  18. Presentation Skills Basic guidelines Prepare objectives Organize the presentation Structure the presentation Tailor the presentation Establish credibility Speak in a responsive and conversational style Use visual aids Practice presentation skills Restate key ideas McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  19. Nonverbal Communication Skills Nonverbal communication is sending and decoding messages with emotional content. Dimensions of nonverbal communication: Body movements and gestures Eye contact Touch Facial expressions Physical distance Tone of voice McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
  20. Listening Skills Help create understanding between both parties Are an active rather than passive activity Use of nonverbal indicators, like eye contact, tone of voice, or touch Are an invaluable skill for managers McGraw-Hill © 2004 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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