Oracle PLSQL Language- P3

Chia sẻ: Thanh Cong | Ngày: | Loại File: PDF | Số trang:50

0
58
lượt xem
14
download

Oracle PLSQL Language- P3

Mô tả tài liệu
  Download Vui lòng tải xuống để xem tài liệu đầy đủ

Tham khảo tài liệu 'oracle plsql language- p3', công nghệ thông tin, cơ sở dữ liệu phục vụ nhu cầu học tập, nghiên cứu và làm việc hiệu quả

Chủ đề:
Lưu

Nội dung Text: Oracle PLSQL Language- P3

  1. routines can now call the JSP as if it were another PL/SQL module. 1.19.1 Example Let's write a simple "Hello, World" JSP that will accept an argument: package oreilly.plsquick.demos; public class Hello { public static String sayIt (String toWhom) { return "Hello, " + toWhom + "!"; } } Saved in a file called Hello.java, we can load the source code directly into Oracle. Doing so will automatically compile the code. A simple form of the loadjava command: loadjava -user scott/tiger -oci8 oreilly/plsquick/ demos/Hello.java The Hello.java file follows the Java file placement convention for packages and so exists in a subdirectory named oreilly/plsquick/demos. Now we can fire up our favorite SQL interpreter, connect as SCOTT/TIGER, and create the call spec for the Hello.sayIt( ) method: CREATE FUNCTION hello_there (to_whom IN VARCHAR2) RETURN VARCHAR2 AS LANGUAGE JAVA NAME 'oreilly.plsquick.demos.Hello.sayIt (java.lang.String) return java.lang.String'; / Now we can call our function very easily: BEGIN DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(hello_there('world')); END; / And we get: Hello, world! Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  2. as the expected output. 1.19.2 Publishing Java to PL/SQL To write a call spec, use the AS LANGUAGE JAVA clause in a CREATE statement. The syntax for this clause is: { IS | AS } LANGUAGE JAVA NAME 'method_fullname [ (type_fullname,... ] [ return type_fullname ]' method_fullname is the package-qualified name of the Java class and method. It is case-sensitive and uses dots to separate parts of the package full name. type_fullname is the package-qualified name of the Java datatype. Notice that a simple string, not an SQL name, follows the NAME keyword. Type mapping follows most JDBC rules regarding the legal mapping of SQL types to Java types. Oracle extensions exist for Oracle-specific datatypes. Most datatype mappings are relatively straightforward, but passing Oracle8 objects of a user-defined type is harder than one would think. Oracle provides a JPublisher tool that generates the Java required to encapsulate an Oracle8 object and its corresponding REF. Refer to Oracle's JPublisher documentation for guidelines on usage. The AS LANGUAGE JAVA clause is the same whether you are using Java as a standalone JSP, the implementation of a packaged program, or the body of an object type method. For example, here is the complete syntax for creating JSPs as PL/SQL-callable functions or procedures: CREATE [OR REPLACE] { PROCEDURE procedure_name [(param[, param]...)] | FUNCTION function_name [(param[, param]...)] RETURN sql_type } [AUTHID {DEFINER | CURRENT_USER}] [PARALLEL_ENABLE] [DETERMINISTIC] { IS | AS } LANGUAGE JAVA NAME 'method_fullname [ (type_fullname,... ] [ return type_fullname ]' When using Java as the implementation of a packaged procedure or function, Oracle allows you to place the Java call spec in either the package specification (where the call spec substitutes for the subprogram specification) or in the package body (where the call spec substitutes for the subprogram body). Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  3. Similarly, when using JSPs in object type methods, the Java call spec can substitute for either the object type method specification or its body. Note that Java functions typically map to PL/SQL functions, but Java functions declared void map to PL/SQL procedures. Also, you will quickly learn that mistakes in mapping PL/SQL parameters to Java parameters become evident only at runtime. 1.19.3 Data Dictionary To learn what Java library units are available in your schema, look in the USER_OBJECTS data dictionary view where the object_type is like `JAVA%'. If you see a Java class with INVALID status, it has not yet been successfully resolved. Note that the names of the Java source library units need not match the names of the classes they produce. As of press time, there is no apparent way to discover which stored programs are implemented as Java stored procedures. You can look in the USER_SOURCE view for named programs that contain the source text `AS LANGUAGE JAVA', but that may not yield accurate results. The USER_DEPENDENCIES view does not track the relationship between PL/SQL cover programs and their underlying Java class. Even if you have loaded the Java source code into the database, there is no supported way of retrieving the source from the data dictionary. Previous: 1.18 External Oracle PL/SQL Language Procedures Pocket Reference 1.18 External Procedures The Oracle Library Navigation Copyright (c) 2000 O'Reilly & Associates. All rights reserved. Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  4. By Steven Feuerstein & Bill Pribyl; ISBN 1-56592-335-9E Second Edition, published September 1997. (See the catalog page for this book.) Search the text of Oracle PL/SQL Programming, 2nd Edition. Index Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z Table of Contents Dedication Foreword Preface Part I: Programming in PL/SQL Chapter 1: Introduction to PL/SQL Chapter 2: PL/SQL Language Fundamentals Chapter 3: Effective Coding Style Part II: PL/SQL Language Elements Chapter 4: Variables and Program Data Chapter 5: Conditional and Sequential Control Chapter 6: Database Interaction and Cursors Chapter 7: Loops Chapter 8: Exception Handlers Chapter 9: Records in PL/SQL Chapter 10: PL/SQL Tables Part III: Built-In Functions Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  5. Chapter 11: Character Functions Chapter 12: Date Functions Chapter 13: Numeric, LOB, and Miscellaneous Functions Chapter 14: Conversion Functions Part IV: Modular Code Chapter 15: Procedures and Functions Chapter 16: Packages Chapter 17: Calling PL/SQL Functions in SQL Part V: New PL/SQL8 Features Chapter 18: Object Types Chapter 19: Nested Tables and VARRAYs Chapter 20: Object Views Chapter 21: External Procedures Part VI: Making PL/SQL Programs Work Chapter 22: Code Design Tips Chapter 23: Managing Code in the Database Chapter 24: Debugging PL/SQL Chapter 25: Tuning PL/SQL Applications Chapter 26: Tracing PL/SQL Execution Part VII: Appendixes Appendix A: What's on the Companion Disk? Appendix B: Calling Stored Procedures from PL/SQL Version 1.1 Appendix C: Built-In Packages The Oracle PL/SQL CD Bookshelf Navigation Copyright © 2000 O'Reilly & Associates. All Rights Reserved. Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  6. Full Text Search If you are having difficulty searching, or if you have not used this search utility before, please read this. The Oracle PL/SQL CD Bookshelf Navigation Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  7. Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z Index: Symbols and Numbers \:= (assignment) operator 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set 4.4.3. Default Values 9.5. Assigning Values to and from Records -- (comment indicator) : 2.5.1. Single-Line Comment Syntax > (label delimeters) : 5.2.1. The GOTO Statement ' (quotation mark) 2.3.1. Embedding Single Quotes Inside a String 11.1.10. The REPLACE function ; (semicolon) : 2.4. The Semicolon Delimiter /* and */ (comment block delimiters) : 2.5.2. Multiline Comment Syntax || (concatenation) operator 4.3.3. Function Results with NULL Arguments 11.1.3. The CONCAT function Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z The Oracle Library Navigation Copyright (c) 2000 O'Reilly & Associates. All rights reserved. Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  8. Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z Index: A ABS function : 13.1.1. The ABS function absolute value : 13.1.1. The ABS function abstract data types : (see ADTs) abstraction : 18.1.5.3. Abstraction access to compiled code, tuning : 25.2. Tuning Access to Compiled Code to data, tuning : 25.3. Tuning Access to Your Data data structure, encapsulating : 1.7.2. Synchronize Program and Data Structures to SQL, minimizing : 25.3.1. Use Package Data to Minimize SQL Access ACCESS table, tuning : 25.2.3. Tune ACCESS$ Table to Reduce First Execution Time of Code actual parameters : 15.6.3. Actual and Formal Parameters Ada programming language : Preface ADD_MONTHS function : 12.1.1. The ADD_MONTHS function customizing : 12.2.1. Customizing the Behavior of ADD_MONTHS adding collection elements : 19.4.3. Adding and Removing Elements administration of Oracle databases : About the Contents administration, Oracle/AQ : C.3.2. DBMS_AQADM (PL/SQL 8 Only) ADTs (abstract datatypes) (see also object types) 18.1.4.2. Classification building : 22.6. Construct Abstract Data Types (ADTs) advanced queuing : 1.4.7.2. Oracle/AQ, the Advanced Queueing Facility ADVISE_COMMIT procedure : C.15.1. The ADVISE_COMMIT procedure ADVISE_NOTHING procedure : C.15.2. The ADVISE_NOTHING procedure ADVISE_ROLLBACK procedure : C.15.3. The ADVISE_ROLLBACK procedure aggregate assignment into rows : 10.6.3. Aggregate Assignment operations 9.1.3.2. Aggregate operations 9.5.4. Aggregate Assignment 9.6.1.2. Records of the same type of nested records : 9.7.3. Aggregate Assignments of Nested Records Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  9. values, combining with scalars : 17.8.2. Combining Scalar and Aggregate Values aggregation : 18.1.4.3. Inheritance alerts : (see DBMS_ALERT package) algorithms, tuning : 25.4. Tuning Your Algorithms aliases column 6.7. Column Aliases in Cursors 9.3.2. Setting the Record's Column Names directory : 13.2.1. The BFILENAME function for cursor variables : 6.12.6.3. Cursor variable aliases alignment of code : (see coding, layout of) ALLOCATE_UNIQUE procedure : C.7.1. The ALLOCATE_UNIQUE procedure ALTER SESSION command : 26.1.1. Enabling Program Units for Tracing ALTER TABLE statement : 20.6. Schema Evolution ALTER_COMPILE procedure : C.4.1. The ALTER_COMPILE procedure ALTER_QUEUE procedure : C.3.2.4. The ALTER_QUEUE procedure ANALYZE statement : 25.1. Analyzing Program Performance ANALYZE_OBJECT procedure : C.4.2. The ANALYZE_OBJECT procedure ANALYZE_SCHEMA procedure : C.16.1. The ANALYZE_SCHEMA procedure anchored datatypes 1.6.1. Anchored declarations 4.5. Anchored Declarations anchoring to subtypes : 4.6.3. Emulating Constrained Subtypes angle brackets (>) as label delimiters : 5.2.1. The GOTO Statement anonymous blocks : 15.3. The Anonymous PL/SQL Block labels for : 15.3.6. Block Labels nested : 15.3.4. Nested Blocks in Oracle Tools : 15.3.3. Anonymous Blocks in the Oracle Tools APPEND procedure : C.6.1. The APPEND procedure applications, tuning : 25. Tuning PL/SQL Applications access to compiled code : 25.2. Tuning Access to Compiled Code access to data : 25.3. Tuning Access to Your Data analyzing performance : 25.1. Analyzing Program Performance optimizing algorithms : 25.4. Tuning Your Algorithms AQ : (see advanced queuing) arguments, trapping invalid : 22.2.4.1. Trap invalid argument values arrays (see also tables) 1.4.3.4. PL/SQL tables building with tables : 10.9.4. Building Traditional Arrays with PL/SQL Tables package for (see also PSG_array package) Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  10. 10.9.4.3. Features of the array package variable arrays : 1.4.7.3. Variable arrays and nested tables objects for : 18.1.2. Some Simple Examples variable-size : (see VARRAYs) ASCII function : 11.1.1. The ASCII function assertion modules : 22.2.4. Use Assertion Modules to Validate Parameters and Assumptions assigning objects : 18.4.1.2. Direct assignment assignment (\:=) operator 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set 4.4.3. Default Values 9.5. Assigning Values to and from Records association operator for positional notation (=>) : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set association, object : 18.1.4.3. Inheritance atomics of PL/SQL language : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set attributes, cursor 6.9. Cursor Attributes 6.12.2. Similarities to Static Cursors attributes, object : 18.1.1. Terminology collections as : 19.2.1.2. Collection as an attribute of an object type dot notation for 18.3.4.1. Dots in data structures 18.3.4.3. Attribute or method? object equality and : 18.3.6.2. Equality comparisons authority, execute/run : (see execute authority) Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z The Oracle Library Navigation Copyright (c) 2000 O'Reilly & Associates. All rights reserved. Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  11. Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z Index: B backups : 24.2.6. Document and Back Up Your Efforts batch processing : 25.3.4. Take Advantage of DBMS_SQL Batch Processing encrypting code and : 23.7.2. Working with Encrypted Code BEGIN_DISCRETE_TRANSACTION procedure : C.15.14. The BEGIN_DISCRETE_TRANSACTION procedure BFILE datatype 1.4.7.6. Large object support 4.2.7.7. Working with BFILEs example of using : 20.8. Postscript: Using the BFILE Datatype BFILENAME function 4.2.7.7. Working with BFILEs 13.2.1. The BFILENAME function binary data : (see RAW datatype) BINARY_INTEGER datatype 4.2.1.1. Binary integer datatypes 25.4.5. Use PLS_INTEGER for All Integer Operations for table declaration : 10.4.1. Defining the Table TYPE BIND_ARRAY program : 25.3.4. Take Advantage of DBMS_SQL Batch Processing BIND_VARIABLE procedure : C.14.2. The BIND_VARIABLE procedure blended access : 10.9.5.6. Performance impact of blended access BLOB datatype 1.4.7.6. Large object support 4.2.7.2. The BLOB datatype EMPTY_BLOB function : 13.2.2. The EMPTY_BLOB function block comments : 2.5.2. Multiline Comment Syntax blocks (see also modules) 2.7. Block Structure 15. Procedures and Functions anonymous : 15.3. The Anonymous PL/SQL Block constructing : 15.2.1. Sequence of Section Construction cursors in : 15.3.5.4. Cursor scope Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  12. labels for : 15.3.6. Block Labels local : 15.7. Local Modules nested 15.3.4. Nested Blocks 15.3.5.2. Scope and nested blocks parameters of : 15.6. Parameters Booch diagram : 16.2.4. Public and Private Package Elements Boolean datatype : 4.2.4. The Boolean Datatype functions returning : 15.5.4.1. Functions without parameters literals : 2.3.3. Boolean Literals as parameters : 22.7.2. Use Self-Identifying Parameters (Avoid Boolean Values) variables in IF statements : (see IF statements) branching with exceptions : 1.7.5. Structured Code and Other Best Practices BROKEN procedure : C.5.1. The BROKEN procedure built-in collection methods : 19.6. Collection Built-Ins functionality, taking advantage of : 1.7.1. Write as Little Code as Possible package, reference on : C. Built-In Packages Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z The Oracle Library Navigation Copyright (c) 2000 O'Reilly & Associates. All rights reserved. Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  13. Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z Index: C calendar : (see date) case consistency of : 22.7.4. Ensure Case Consistency of Parameters INITCAP function : 11.1.4. The INITCAP function LOWER function : 11.1.7. The LOWER function and readability : 3.1.2. Using Case to Aid Readability sensitivity 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set 2.3. Literals UPPER function : 11.1.16. The UPPER function CAST procedure object views and : 20.1. Example: Using Object Views CAST pseudo-function : 19.5.2. The CAST Pseudo-function casting collections : 19.5.2.1. Casting a named collection CDE : (see Cooperative Development Environment) CEIL (ceiling) function : 13.1.6. The CEIL function century : (see date) CHANGE procedure : C.5.2. The CHANGE procedure CHAR datatype 2.3. Literals 4.2.3.1. The CHAR datatype converting to VARCHAR2 : 4.2.3.2. The VARCHAR2 and VARCHAR datatypes converting to/from ROWID 14.2.1. The CHARTOROWID function 14.2.5. The ROWIDTOCHAR function with LENGTH function : 11.1.6. The LENGTH function character datatypes, in overloaded modules : 15.8.4. Restrictions on Overloading character functions : 11. Character Functions character sets : 14.2.2. The CONVERT function characters adding to strings : 11.1.11. The RPAD function converting to numbers, package for : 17.8.7. Recursive Processing in a SQL Statement Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  14. datatypes for : 4.2.3. Character Datatypes extracting from strings : 11.1.14. The SUBSTR function NLS datatypes for : 4.2.6. NLS Character Datatypes replacing in strings 11.1.10. The REPLACE function 11.1.15. The TRANSLATE function stripping from strings 11.1.12. The RTRIM function 11.1.9. The LTRIM function word wrap : 11.2.2. Implementing Word Wrap for Long Text CHARSETFORM property : 21.4.3.4. CHARSETID and CHARSETFORM properties CHARSETID property : 21.4.3.4. CHARSETID and CHARSETFORM properties CHARTOROWID function : 14.2.1. The CHARTOROWID function checking for NULL values : 4.3.2. Checking for NULL Values child block : (see nested blocks) child records : (see records) CHR function : 11.1.2. The CHR function class instances : 18.1.4.2. Classification classes : (see object types) classification of objects : 18.1.4.2. Classification clearing tables : 10.7. Clearing the PL/SQL Table client-side SQL : 25.3.3. Avoid Client-Side SQL CLOB datatype 1.4.7.6. Large object support 4.2.7.3. The CLOB datatype EMPTY_CLOB function : 13.2.3. The EMPTY_CLOB function clock : (see time) CLOSE statement (see also cursors) 6.2.2. Cursor Operations 6.8. Closing Cursors CLOSE_CURSOR procedure : C.14.3. The CLOSE_CURSOR procedure CLOSE_DATABASE_LINK procedure : C.12.1. The CLOSE_DATABASE_LINK procedure closing cursors : 6.8. Closing Cursors code compiled, tuning access to : 25.2. Tuning Access to Compiled Code critical, pinning into SGA : 25.2.2. Pin Critical Code into the SGA encrypting : 23.7. Encrypting Stored Code memory-based architecture : 23.1.3. Memory-Based Architecture of PL/SQL Code procedural, avoiding : 25.3.5. Avoid Procedural Code When Possible repetetive : (see redundancy) reusing : 1.7.1. Write as Little Code as Possible Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  15. shared, executing : 23.1. Executing Stored Code structuring of : 1.7.5. Structured Code and Other Best Practices style of : 1.7.4. Standardize Your PL/SQL Development Environment testing : 24.2.5. Change and Test One Area of Code at a Time coding : 1.2. The Concept of Programming in Oracle Applications analyzing size of : 23.6.3. Analyzing the Size of PL/SQL Code anticipating errors : (see exceptions) avoiding repetitive : 22.3. Take Full Advantage of Local Modularization comments in : (see comments) considering parameter case : 22.7.4. Ensure Case Consistency of Parameters creating independent modules : 22.5. Create Independent Modules cross-referencing source code : 23.6.5. Cross-Referencing Source Code in databases : 23. Managing Code in the Database documenting : 24.2.6. Document and Back Up Your Efforts errors : (see errors; exceptions) finding strings in : 23.6.4. Displaying and Searching Source Code hints for effective 1.5. Advice for Oracle Programmers 3. Effective Coding Style 4.2.8.3. Drawbacks of implicit conversions 22. Code Design Tips commenting : 3.6. Using Comments Effectively exception handling : 8.10. RAISE Nothing but Exceptions IF statements : 5.1.4. Nested IF Statements loops : 7.7. Tips for PL/SQL Loops nested records : 9.7.1. Example of Nested Records parameters : 22.7. Tips for Parameter Design records : 9.1.3.3. Leaner, cleaner code increasing readability of code : 5.2.2.1. Improving the readability of your program layout of : 3.1. Fundamentals of Effective Layout recursive processing : 17.8.7. Recursive Processing in a SQL Statement removing unused variables : 4.7.6. Remove Unused Variables from Programs sequential processing : 17.8.6. Sequential Processing Against a Column's Value simplifying logic with variables : 4.7.9. Use Variables to Hide Complex Logic testing programs : 2.5.2. Multiline Comment Syntax collections adding/removing elements from : 19.4.3. Adding and Removing Elements built-in methods for : 19.6. Collection Built-Ins casting : 19.5.2.1. Casting a named collection choosing which kind to use : 19.9. Which Collection Type Should I Use? collection variables Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  16. 19.2.2.1. Collection variables 19.4.1. Initializing Collection Variables comparing : 19.4.4. Comparing Collections creating : 19.2. Creating the New Collections data dictionary entries for : 19.8.2. Data Dictionary declaring as datatype : 19.2.2. Collections in PL/SQL index-by tables : (see index-by tables) nested tables : (see nested tables) passing arguments of : 19.8.3. Call by Reference or Call by Value PL/SQL-to-server integration example : 19.7. Example: PL/SQL-to-Server Integration privileges : 19.8.1. Privileges pseudo-functions : 19.5. Collection Pseudo-Functions types of : 19.1. Types of Collections VARRAYs : (see VARRAYs) COLUMN_VALUE procedure : C.14.4. The COLUMN_VALUE procedure columns (see also records) 9.1.1. Different Types of Records abbreviations for : 3.2. Formatting SQL Statements aliases for 3.2. Formatting SQL Statements 6.7. Column Aliases in Cursors 9.3.2. Setting the Record's Column Names BFILE, initializing : 13.2.1. The BFILENAME function choosing for cursor-based record : 9.3.1. Choosing Columns for a Cursor Record collections as : 19.2.1.1. Collection as a "column" in a conventional table collections as datatypes for : 19.1. Types of Collections names for : 1.7.5. Structured Code and Other Best Practices naming procedure : 17.6. Column/Function Name Precedence objects for : 18.1.2. Some Simple Examples VALUE operator with : 18.4.2.3. VALUE partial values of : 17.8.5. GROUP BY Partial Column Values represented by variables : 4.7.7. Use %TYPE When a Variable Represents a Column sequential processing against value : 17.8.6. Sequential Processing Against a Column's Value synchronization with : 4.5.1.1. Synchronization with database columns where OIDS are stored : 18.4.2.1. Object identifiers (OIDs) COMMA_TO_TABLE procedure : C.16.2. The COMMA_TO_TABLE procedure COMMENT keyword : 6.1.1. The COMMIT Statement comments : 2.5. Comments associated with transactions : 6.1.1. The COMMIT Statement describing parameters : 22.7.1. Document All Parameters and Their Functions Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  17. encrypted code and : 23.7.3. Impact of Encrypting Code symbols for : 2.1. The PL/SQL Character Set using effectively : 3.6. Using Comments Effectively COMMIT procedure (see also DBMS_PIPE) C.10. DBMS_PIPE C.15.4. The COMMIT procedure COMMIT statement 6.1.1. The COMMIT Statement 6.11.1. Releasing Locks with COMMIT COMMIT_COMMENT procedure : C.15.5. The COMMIT_COMMENT procedure COMMIT_FORCE procedure : C.15.6. The COMMIT_FORCE procedure Companion Utilities Guide : A. What's on the Companion Disk? COMPARE function : C.6.2. The COMPARE function comparing collections : 19.4.4. Comparing Collections with NULL : 4.3. NULLs in PL/SQL objects : 18.3.6. Comparing Objects records : 9.1.6. Comparing Two Records strings 4.2.3.2. The VARCHAR2 and VARCHAR datatypes 11.1.13. The SOUNDEX function comparison methods : 18.3.1. About Object Types compilation automatic : 23.3.1. Interdependencies of Stored Objects errors, viewing : 23.5.4. Viewing Compilation Errors in SQL*Plus manual : 23.3.1. Interdependencies of Stored Objects of modules : 4.5.2. Anchoring at Compile Time COMPILE_SCHEMA procedure : C.16.3. The COMPILE_SCHEMA procedure compiler constructs : (see pragmas) compiling forced : 20.7.3. Forcing Compilation package specifications : 1.7.3. Center All Development Around Packages compound symbols : (see symbols) CONCAT function 4.3.3. Function Results with NULL Arguments 11.1.3. The CONCAT function concatenation (||) operator 4.3.3. Function Results with NULL Arguments 11.1.3. The CONCAT function concatenation, string 4.3.3. Function Results with NULL Arguments Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  18. 11.1.3. The CONCAT function conditional control structures : 5. Conditional and Sequential Control formatting : 3.3. Formatting Control Structures conditional loops : (see loops) constants : (see literals; named constants; variables) constrained datatypes 4.4.1. Constrained Declarations 4.6. Programmer-Defined Subtypes 4.6.3. Emulating Constrained Subtypes constructor methods 18.2.2.1. PL/SQL usage 18.3.1. About Object Types 18.4.1.1. Constructors constructors, initializing collections : 19.4.1.1. Initializing with a constructor control structures, iterative : (see loops) conventions, naming : 4.7.1. Establish Clear Variable Naming Conventions conversion and format models : 14.1. Conversion Formats functions for : 14. Conversion Functions implicit : 14. Conversion Functions CONVERT function C.7.2. The CONVERT function 14.2.2. The CONVERT function converting between datatypes : 4.2.8. Conversion Between Datatypes datatypes external procedures and : 21.4.1. Datatype Conversion performance and : 25.4.7. Avoid Type Conversions When Possible explicitly versus implicitly : 4.2.8.1. Explicit data conversions to/from hexadecimal : 14.2.3. The HEXTORAW function to row numbers : 10.5.1. Automatic Conversion of Row Number Expressions triggers to procedures : 25.3.7. Keep Database Triggers Small variables to named constants : 4.7.5. Convert Variables into Named Constants Cooperative Development Environment (CDE) : 1.2. The Concept of Programming in Oracle Applications COPY procedure : C.6.3. The COPY procedure correlated subqueries : 17.8.3. Replacing Correlated Subqueries correlation variables : 18.4.2.2. REFs COS function : 13.1.7. The COS function COSH function : 13.1.8. The COSH function COUNT function 10.8.2.1. The COUNT function Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  19. 19.6.1. COUNT counted loops : (see numeric FOR loops) counting substring occurrences : 11.2.4. Counting Substring Occurrences in Strings CREATE command : 23.5.1. Creating Stored Objects CREATE DIRECTORY command : 4.2.7.7. Working with BFILEs CREATE LIBRARY command 21.2.3. Step 3: Issue CREATE LIBRARY Statement 21.3.1. CREATE LIBRARY: Creating the External Procedure Library CREATE OR REPLACE command : 23.5.3. Changing Stored Objects CREATE TYPE BODY statement : 18.3.3. CREATE TYPE BODY: Creating a Body CREATE TYPE command : 19.2. Creating the New Collections CREATE TYPE ... AS OBJECT statement : 19.2.1.2. Collection as an attribute of an object type CREATE TYPE statement : 18.3.2. CREATE TYPE and DROP TYPE: Creating and Dropping Types CREATE VIEW statement : 20.3.1. CREATE VIEW: Creating an Object View CREATE_QUEUE procedure : C.3.2.3. The CREATE_QUEUE procedure CREATE_QUEUE_TABLE procedure : C.3.2.1. The CREATE_QUEUE_TABLE procedure cursor FOR loops : 7.4. The Cursor FOR Loop formatting : 3.3.2. Formatting Loops premature termination of : 7.7.2.1. Premature FOR loop termination records in : 7.4.2. The Cursor FOR Loop Record scope of : 7.6.2.1. Scope in FOR loops CURSOR statement : 6.4. Declaring Cursors cursor variables aliases for : 6.12.6.3. Cursor variable aliases as arguments : 6.12.7. Passing Cursor Variables as Arguments attributes of : 6.12.2. Similarities to Static Cursors scope of : 6.12.6.4. Scope of cursor object CURSOR_ALREADY_OPEN exception : 8.3.1. Named System Exceptions cursors : 6.2. Cursors in PL/SQL attributes of : 6.9. Cursor Attributes for cursor variables : 6.12.2. Similarities to Static Cursors %FOUND : 6.9.1. The %FOUND Attribute %ISOPEN 6.5. Opening Cursors 6.9.4. The %ISOPEN Attribute %NOTFOUND 6.6.2. Fetching Past the Last Row 6.9.2. The %NOTFOUND Attribute %ROWCOUNT : 6.9.3. The %ROWCOUNT Attribute closing : 6.8. Closing Cursors Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  20. column aliases in : 6.7. Column Aliases in Cursors corresponding to records : 9.1.4. Guidelines for Using Records cursor variables 1.4.5.2. Cursor variables 6.2.1. Types of Cursors 6.12. Cursor Variables restrictions on : 6.12.8. Cursor Variable Restrictions database access based on : 1.4.3.8. Cursor-based access to the database declaring : 6.4. Declaring Cursors in packages : 16.3.2. Declaring Package Cursors examples of using : 6.13. Working with Cursors explicit 1.7.4. Standardize Your PL/SQL Development Environment 6.2.1. Types of Cursors 6.3.3. Explicit Cursors FETCH INTO from : 9.5.3. FETCH INTO from an Explicit Cursor explicit, fetching from : 1.7.2. Synchronize Program and Data Structures fetching from : 6.6. Fetching from Cursors FOR loops for 1.6.4. The cursor FOR loop 1.7.1. Write as Little Code as Possible group functions in : 6.13.1.1. Inefficiency of group functions in cursors identifier precedence : 6.4.3. Identifier Precedence in a Cursor implicit 1.7.4. Standardize Your PL/SQL Development Environment 6.2.1. Types of Cursors 6.3.1. Implicit Cursors 6.9. Cursor Attributes 6.9.5. Implicit SQL Cursor Attributes SELECT INTO from : 9.5.2. SELECT INTO from an Implicit Cursor naming : 6.4.1. The Cursor Name opening 6.2.2. Cursor Operations 6.5. Opening Cursors 6.10.2. Opening Cursors with Parameters parameters of : 6.10. Cursor Parameters records based on : 9.3. Cursor-Based Records RETURN statement : 6.4.4. The Cursor RETURN Clause scope of : 15.3.5.4. Cursor scope SELECT FOR UPDATE statement : 6.11. SELECT FOR UPDATE in Cursors specifying in packages : 16.3. The Package Specification static : 6.2.1. Types of Cursors Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
Đồng bộ tài khoản