SolidWorks 2010- P16

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SolidWorks 2010- P16

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SolidWorks 2010- P16: Whether you are a new user of SolidWorks or a professional who wants to improve your skills, this book was written for you. Learning any software can be difficult at times. You launch the software for the first time, and you feel overwhelmed, not knowing how to even start a new document. In 3D CAD programs, it can be especially difficult. Many times a whole new vocabulary and a whole new creative environment are introduced.

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  1. Insert a Bill of Materials in an Assembly Document 419 F I g U R e 1 2 . 8 Pointer displaying the blue move icon 3. While still holding the left mouse button, move the table to a differ- ent place in the graphics area. 4. To resize the entire table without scaling the text, move the mouse pointer to any of the four corners of the table. When the mouse pointer turns into a diagonal arrow, click and hold the left mouse button. As you move the mouse while holding the mouse button, the table will scale, and the text will remain full size, just as shown in Figure 12.9. F I g U R e 1 2 . 9 Resizing the table N O t e It is possible that once you’re finished either moving or resizing the BOM, you’ll see the BOM PropertyManager display or a flyout toolbar appear. Click anywhere in the graphics area to close them. Hide and Show the Bill of Materials We could say plenty more about the BOM, but we will do that in the next chapter. For now, you will simply hide the BOM in the graphics area. Notice that you’re not deleting the BOM; you’re simply hiding it from view. You won’t be able to see it in the graphics area, but the BOM feature will remain inside the Tables folder
  2. 420 C h a p t e r 12 • P u t t i n g I t A l l To g e t h e r : P a r t 2 in the FeatureManager design tree, and you can always show the BOM again at any time. Follow these steps to learn how to hide and show the BOM: 1. Move the mouse pointer inside the boundaries of the table. Right-click with your mouse. In the menu that appears, select Hide ➢ Table. The bill of materials table will now be hidden from view. 2. To display the BOM again, click the plus (+) next to the folder labeled Tables in the FeatureManager design tree. 3. Right-click the bill of materials table in the Tables folder, and select Show Table in the menu. You are now able to insert, modify, and hide a BOM inside an assembly docu- ment. Make sure that the BOM is very well hidden, and continue reading the next section of this chapter to learn more about how to get the best out of your assembly documents. Control the Display of the Assembly As you may probably remember from early chapters in this book, you can control the way in which individual components are displayed in the assembly by modify- ing their color, appearance, level of transparency, and display mode, or simply by hiding them. All these different display settings for the individual components in the assembly can be viewed and modified through the display pane, as you can see in Figure 12.10. Remember to click the >> at the top of the FeatureManager pane to expand the display pane. Click
  3. Control the Display of the Assembly 421 Set Display States A display state stores information about a particular combination of display settings for the components in the assembly. Although the components remain the same from one display state to another, the way they are to be displayed in the assembly will be different. For instance, you may want to hide some components in the assem- bly so you can have better access to those that would otherwise be covered by them. Perhaps you want to make some component transparent so you can see those that lay underneath; for example, in the case of a large model of a car, you could make the body transparent to show the engine, the transmission, and all other internal components. You could also create several display states to show different stages in the process of assembly of a product or have a display state where all components that have been purchased from a certain manufacturer are shown in the same color. Display states should not be confused with assembly configurations. Unlike dis- play states, assembly configurations show different versions of a same model, but in this case the components are really not the same, or at least aren’t in the same positions, from one version to the other. You can use assembly configurations to show the components of your assembly arranged in different positions or to create simplified versions of your model, where the elements are shown without cosmetic details. You can also create configurations to show how the same model would look like if you changed the size or material of some of the components. Creating a configuration where some of the components have been made light- weight is also useful, especially when working with large assemblies. All display states available for the assembly will be shown in the bottom section of the ConfigurationManager, as you can see in Figure 12.11. Notice that Default_ Display State-1 is the only display state available for this assembly at the moment. F I g U R e 1 2 . 1 1 Showing existing display states
  4. 422 C h a p t e r 12 • P u t t i n g I t A l l To g e t h e r : P a r t 2 Create a Display State Creating your own display state is easy. Simply right-click any empty area of the ConfigurationManager and select Add Display State. A new display state will be added to the list, and it will also become the active display state. Just make sure nothing is selected in the ConfigurationManager before you begin. If something is already selected, you can simply left-click anywhere in the graphics area, and that should take care of the problem. The following steps will guide you through the process of creating a new dis- play state and making changes to the display settings for the individual compo- nents in the assembly: 1. If you haven’t already, hide the bill of materials table, and double- click the scroll wheel button to fit the assembly in the screen. 2. Click the ConfigurationManager tab in the FeatureManager. 3. Right-click anywhere in the ConfigurationManager, and select Add Display State in the menu. 4. Double-click the split bar above the FeatureManager to split the pane into two equal panes. The top pane will contain the FeatureManager, and the bottom pane will contain the ConfigurationManager. 5. Click the chevron next to the tabs at the top of the ConfigurationManager to expand the display pane. If you followed all the steps carefully up to this point, it should look like Figure 12.12. The new display state you just cre- ated appears on the list with the name Display State-1. It’s highlighted in blue to indicate that it’s active. F I g U R e 1 2 . 1 2 Showing the new display state on the list
  5. Control the Display of the Assembly 423 6. Any change to a part or subassembly made in one of the four col- umns of the display pane will be applied to the active display state only. Click the Display Mode icon for the lamp base, and select Hidden Lines Visible in the menu. 7. Click the Hide/Show icon for the electrical cover. If you have followed all the steps correctly, the display pane for the assembly should look like Figure 12.13. F I g U R e 1 2 . 1 3 Display pane after the changes to settings Rename a Display State So far, you’ve managed to create a new display state for your assembly and change the display settings for some of the components. The only problem is, the name SolidWorks gave to the display setting isn’t really meaningful for you. You need to change this name to something that tells you more about the par- ticular combination of display settings in the display state. 1. Right-click Display State-1 on the list at the bottom section of the ConfigurationManager, and select Properties from the flyout menu. 2. The Display State Properties PropertyManager will show up, just like in Figure 12.14. Under Display State Name, replace the old name with the new one, Hidden Lines Visible. 3. Click the green check mark to accept the name. The active dis- play state should now appear listed under the new name in the ConfigurationManager.
  6. 424 C h a p t e r 12 • P u t t i n g I t A l l To g e t h e r : P a r t 2 F I g U R e 1 2 . 1 4 Renaming Display State-1 Activate a Display State Once you start collecting multiple display states for your model, sooner or later you’ll need to change from one to another. This is what is called activating a dis- play state and can be done in a few different ways. One way to do it is by double- clicking the display state of your choice among the inactive ones in the list at the bottom section of the ConfigurationManager. Another approach is to right-click anywhere in the display pane, select Activate Display State in the flyout menu, and select a display state in the submenu. From the FeatureManager pane, you can also right-click the >> that you would usually click to show the display pane and select a display state from the list that will show up in the flyout menu. N O t e There’s also a dedicated Display States toolbar available. To activate this toolbar, right-click anywhere in an empty area of the CommandManager, and select Display States from the list of available toolbars. Set the Display State Mode You may have probably noticed the option Link Display States To Configurations under the list of display states and at the very bottom of the ConfigurationManager. What exactly does this mean? If you leave this option deselected, as you have been doing all along, then the display states are independent of the configurations in the assembly, and for this reason all display states will be available to every configuration you may have. If, on the other hand, you select this option, then each display state you create will be assigned to only one configuration in particular, although each configu- ration can have more than one display state. You are now familiar with the use of display states to control the display of the components in the assembly. Next, you’ll learn about different ways in which you can select components inside the assembly.
  7. U n d e r s t a n d S e l e c t i o n To o l s f o r A s s e m b l i e s 425 Understand Selection Tools for Assemblies You will now learn about several different tools for selecting components in the assembly, which can certainly come in handy from time to time. To access these tools, look for the Select button on the Standard toolbar at the top of the graph- ics area. You should be able to display a list of selection tools, such as the one in Figure 12.15. F I g U R e 1 2 . 1 5 Selection tools for assemblies We’ll cover what each of these selection tools can do for you. Use the Volume Select Tool This tool allows you to visually select components in the assembly by enclosing them inside a temporary volume that you define. The way it works is best under- stood through an example. Follow these steps to learn how to use it: 1. If you closed the desk lamp assembly, open it again. Click the Select button, and choose Volume Select from the list. 2. For illustration purposes, you’ll use this tool to select the components from the bulb subassembly. Yes, it’s easier to simply select the subas- sembly directly from the FeatureManager, but the idea is to learn how to use this tool. Rotate the assembly so you can get a better view of the lightbulb from underneath the lamp. With the left button of your mouse, click and drag on the graphics area to define a rectangle around the components that will be selected, as shown in Figure 12.16. This rectangle is the first step in defining your volume. Note, however, that if you drag from left to right, all components inside the volume will be selected, and if you drag from right to left, then all components inside of or crossed by the volume will be selected. In this example, you are dragging a rectangle from left to right, so only components completely enclosed within the volume will be selected.
  8. 426 C h a p t e r 12 • P u t t i n g I t A l l To g e t h e r : P a r t 2 F I g U R e 1 2 . 1 6 Defining a rectangle to select components 3. When you release the left mouse button, you should see that the rect- angle has turned into a box with handles, like the one in Figure 12.17. You will probably also notice that the box doesn’t seem to include all the components you wanted to select. You need to adjust this volume so it can enclose the components you want to select. F I g U R e 1 2 . 1 7 Volume for selection before adjustments 4. Drag the handles on the sides of the box until the volume completely encloses the lightbulb and the bulb receptacle. You may even need to rotate the model a few times to get a better view of the components. Notice that the selected components are shown in blue in the graph- ics area (see Figure 12.18).
  9. U n d e r s t a n d S e l e c t i o n To o l s f o r A s s e m b l i e s 427 F I g U R e 1 2 . 1 8 Selected components enclosed by volume 5. Press Esc on your keyboard to finish the selection or simply initiate any other command that would be available for a multiple selection. As an example, we’ll now isolate these components. Right-click any- where in the graphics area, and select Isolate. As you may remember from Chapter 10, Isolate will hide all other nonselected components in the assembly, leaving only those you have selected visible. Make sure to click Exit Isolate to make all the components visible again before you continue. Select Hidden Use this tool to select all hidden components in the assembly and highlight them in the FeatureManager design tree. Follow these steps for an example of how to use this tool: 1. Make sure the Hidden Lines Visible display state that you created in a previous example is active. If it’s not, activate it by double-clicking it in the list at the bottom of the ConfigurationManager. 2. Click the Select button, and choose Select Hidden from the list. You won’t see any changes in the graphics area, but all the hidden com- ponents in the assembly will be highlighted in the FeatureManager design tree. In this case, the only hidden component you have is the electrical cover.
  10. 428 C h a p t e r 12 • P u t t i n g I t A l l To g e t h e r : P a r t 2 Select Suppressed Use this tool to select all components that have been suppressed in the assembly and highlight them in the FeatureManager design tree. You don’t have any sup- pressed components in the desk lamp assembly, but if you did, you would see that this tool works in the same way as Select Hidden. Remember, however, that unlike a hidden component, a suppressed component is not only not seen in the graphics area but is also not solved at all in the assembly. Select Mated To Use this tool to select all components that are mated to another component of your choice. The component itself won’t be selected, however — only those that are mated to it will be. Follow these steps for an example of how to use this tool: 1. Make sure nothing is already selected in the graphics area or the FeatureManager design tree. 2. In the FeatureManager design tree, click the Shaft, Lamp component to select it; then click the Select button, and choose Select Mated To from the list of selection tools. 3. As shown in Figure 12.19, in the graphics area, three components will appear highlighted in blue: the base lamp, the custom bearing nut, and the shade mount. If needed, rotate the assembly so you can get a better view from behind. Notice that these same three compo- nents appear highlighted in the FeatureManager design tree. These are all the components that are mated to the Shaft, Lamp. F I g U R e 1 2 . 1 9 Components mated to the Shaft, Lamp
  11. U n d e r s t a n d S e l e c t i o n To o l s f o r A s s e m b l i e s 429 4. Notice that the Shaft, Lamp itself is not included in the selection. If needed, you can include it by holding down Ctrl and selecting the component from the FeatureManager design tree. Select Internal Components Use this tool to select all components that are enclosed by others in the assem- bly and out of sight. The following is an example of how this works: 1. Activate the Default_Display State-1 display state by double-clicking it from the list at the bottom section of the ConfigurationManager. Make sure that nothing is already selected in the assembly. Click the Select button, and choose Select Internal Components from the list of selection tools. 2. Although you can’t quite appreciate it, the custom bearing nut has been selected, and it appears highlighted in the FeatureManager design tree. 3. Right-click anywhere in the graphics area, and select Isolate to see the custom bearing nut. Make sure to click Exit Isolate to make all other components visible again before you continue. Select Toolbox Use this tool to select all those components in the assembly that were inserted from the Toolbox. The components will then appear in blue in the assembly and be highlighted in the FeatureManager design tree. Since you don’t have any Toolbox components in your assembly, trying to use this selection tool would only result in a message being displayed to let you know that no components met your selection criteria. Do an Advanced Select Use this tool to select components in the assembly based on searches for compo- nent characteristics such as mass, status, configuration name, in-context relations, display mode, and so on. The following is a quick example of how this tool works: 1. Make sure nothing is already selected in the assembly and that the display state Hidden Lines Visible is activated. 2. Click the Select button, and choose Advanced Select from the list of selection tools.
  12. 430 C h a p t e r 12 • P u t t i n g I t A l l To g e t h e r : P a r t 2 3. The Advanced Component Selection dialog box will open. From here, you’ll specify your search criteria. Inside the Define Search Criteria tab, look for the Category1 column, and click the empty field below. A list of component characteristics will show. Choose Display from the list to select components based on their display mode. 4. Look for the column Condition, and click it. Display the list of options, and select =. This means that you’ll define as a search crite- rion that the display mode of the components will have to be equal to whatever display mode of your choosing that you’ll specify in just a few moments. 5. Look for the column Value, and click the empty field underneath to display the list of options. Choose HLV from the list for Hidden Lines Visible. 6. Click Apply in the dialog box. SolidWorks will then search and select all components in the assembly that have hidden lines visible as their display mode. The only component found is the Base, Lamp, and it appears highlighted in the FeatureManager design tree and selected in the graphics area. N O t e You can define search criteria based on more than just one characteristic by using AND or OR. For instance, you could use OR at the beginning of the next row and specify search criteria for all components that are hidden. SolidWorks would then search and select all components that are either hidden or have hidden lines visible as their display mode. You are now familiar with all the available selection tools for assemblies and are ready to tackle your next assembly technique. Now that you know how to select the components in the assembly, let’s learn how to sort them out. Understand Assembly Visualization Assembly visualization is part of the new functionality included in SolidWorks 2010. It provides the user with different ways to sort the components of an assem- bly, both in a list and in the graphics area. The components can be sorted by their properties, such as weight, mass, volume, material, and other calculated proper- ties, or by custom noncalculated properties that you may have previously defined, such as vendor name, price, or availability. In the graphics area, the components will appear colored according to the way they’ve been sorted. The idea behind the
  13. Understand Assembly Visualization 431 color is that it helps the user visualize the relative number of components in the assembly that share the same properties. To activate the assembly visualization tools, click the Assembly Visualization button in the Tools menu or on the Evaluate tab in the CommandManager. The way assembly visualization works is best understood by example. In your case, you don’t have any custom properties defined for any of your parts, so you’ll sort them out by weight. Keeping tabs on how much the individual parts of your model weigh can come in handy when planning for costs of packaging and shipping. The following steps will guide you in the process of sorting the components in your assembly using assembly visualization: 1. Click the Evaluate tab of the CommandManager, and click the Assembly Visualization button. You will see an extra tab added to the FeatureManager pane and a list of components displayed, like the one shown in Figure 12.20. If you don’t see the components being assigned different colors in the graphics area, click the colored bar on the left of the list to toggle the colors on. F I g U R e 1 2 . 2 0 Assembly Visualization pane 2. In the Assembly Visualization pane, the components of the desk lamp assembly will be displayed. First, ensure that the display of the value bars is turned on. Toggle the Show/Hide Value Bars by pushing the but- ton located at the top left side of the pane. This will provide you with a graphical representation of the numeric value of the selected property.
  14. 432 C h a p t e r 12 • P u t t i n g I t A l l To g e t h e r : P a r t 2 3. Next, try toggling the Flat/Nested View button to switch between a nested view, such as the one shown in Figure 12.21, where subassem- blies structures are shown as indented, to a flat view, like the one in Figure 12.22, where subassembly structure is ignored and only parts are shown. Showing the parts in the assembly is much like showing parts only in BOM tables. The double icon for some components means there’s more than one instance of that component in the assembly. F I g U R e 1 2 . 2 1 Nested view of assembly F I g U R e 1 2 . 2 2 Flat view of assembly
  15. Understand Assembly Visualization 433 4. If you click the File Name column header at the top of the pane, it will sort all the components in a list alphabetically. 5. Clicking the Quantity column header will sort by the number of instances for each part. 6. Click the right-pointing arrow at the head of the header bar to expand a list of available properties. As you select each property, you will see the value in the last column update to match the property displayed in the header, and, depending on the property, the value bar for each part will update. At the same time, the way the different parts in the model are colored in the graphics area will update as well. 7. Click the right arrow again to display the list of properties again. This time, select More at the bottom of the list. A new window named Custom Column will pop up to allow you to create a new column for the Assembly Visualization pane. 8. Select the field labeled Select Another Property. A list will expand to include other custom properties that are available in the parts. For instance, if materials were specified for each component, you can sort the parts by the material names. This could come in handy if you needed to order the materials used for manufacturing. 9. Below the Column Header field in the Custom Column window, you can also specify a formula that can be used for other functions. For example, you can create a column that will calculate the volume of the parts multiplied by the number of instances for each part. 10. Since you won’t be creating any custom columns at this time, click the Cancel button to close the window. 11. Click the right arrow again, and this time select Total Weight in the list of available columns. 12. Click the Total Weight column header to sort the list in descending order based on the weight of the parts. The colors of each component will change to display what the weight of each part is and where it ranges in the color bar, from heaviest to lightest, as shown in Figure 12.23. Clicking the color bar will turn the display of color in the graphics area off and on. 13. Next to the color bar, there are two handles at the top and bottom of the bar. Adjusting the position of these two bars will change the color of the weight of the components. For example, if you drag the top
  16. 434 C h a p t e r 12 • P u t t i n g I t A l l To g e t h e r : P a r t 2 F I g U R e 1 2 . 2 3 Visualization of parts sorted by weight handle lower in the bar next to the third part in the list, the top three heaviest parts will all be the same color, red. 14. Below the parts list, you can use the rollback bar to exclude parts from the list and subsequently the graphics area. For instance, perhaps you are not concerned with parts that weigh less than 1 gram. Click and hold the left mouse button with the mouse pointer on the rollback bar. Drag the bar above the parts that weigh less than 1 gram. The components will be hidden in the graphics area (see Figure 12.24). F I g U R e 1 2 . 2 4 Raising the rollback bar to hide lighter components
  17. Create an Exploded View of the Assembly 435 15. So, what can you do with this information? Well, you can export the list of parts along with the values shown in the pane into an Excel spreadsheet that can be used for future calculations. Click the right arrow at the top of the pane again, and select Save As at the bottom of the list. 16. In the Save As window, browse to the location where you would like to save the Excel spreadsheet, and change the filename in the File Name field if you like. Click Save to create the spreadsheet. The spreadsheet will be saved in the specified location, and you can use it to calculate the overall weight for shipping. 17. To leave the Assembly Visualization mode, click the Assembly Visualization button in the Evaluate tab again, or simply click the exit button in the upper-right corner of the visualization pane. The Assembly Visualization tab in the FeatureManager pane will be removed. And now that you’ve learned how to use assembly visualization to sort com- ponents in the assembly and extract useful information from your documents, you can continue with the next section of this chapter to learn how to create an exploded view of the model. Create an exploded View of the Assembly Having an exploded view of an assembly can be extremely useful to show the relationships between all its different components, to generate instructions on how a product should be assembled, or even to make it easier to view and select components while performing stress analysis. SolidWorks allows the user to configure exploded views of assemblies, with or without explode lines included. In addition, once created, these exploded views can be edited as needed, used in drawings, or even animated. Exploded views are configuration specific, which means that all exploded views you create will be stored in the active configuration. It’s good practice to create a special configuration exclusively for the exploded view. Create a New exploded View Basically, you create an exploded view by selecting and dragging the individual components of the assembly to a new location in the graphics area. This is usu- ally done in several steps.
  18. 436 C h a p t e r 12 • P u t t i n g I t A l l To g e t h e r : P a r t 2 You use the Exploded View command to move the components, create all the necessary steps, and also edit the steps or delete them, if needed. You can find Exploded View in the Assembly toolbar or through the Insert menu. Once you are finished moving the components, you can add exploded lines to show how all these components relate to each other in the assembly. This is best under- stood through an example: 1. On the desk lamp assembly, make sure Default_Display State-1 is active. 2. Create a new configuration for the desk lamp assembly, and name it Exploded. Make that configuration active. 3. Click Exploded View in the Assembly toolbar, or select Insert ➢ Exploded View. The Explode PropertyManager will show up, and you’ll be prompted to select one or more components and drag them to create an explode step. 4. Click the (+) next to the icon of the desk lamp assembly in the graph- ics area to display the flyout FeatureManager design tree, and select the shade subassembly by clicking it with the left button of your mouse. All components in the shade subassembly are highlighted in blue in the graphics area, and a triad or manipulator shows up, as shown in Figure 12.25. You can drag the arrows in the triad to move the component along the X, Y, or Z direction or drag the triad by its center to move it freely. F I g U R e 1 2 . 2 5 Triad or manipulator
  19. Create an Exploded View of the Assembly 437 5. Click the green arrow of the triad, and drag it upward. The whole subassembly will move upward, as well. If Instant3D is enabled, a ruler will appear to help you position your component, as shown in Figure 12.26. F I g U R e 1 2 . 2 6 Dragging the arrow of the triad t I p You can also enter an explode distance directly from the Explode PropertyManager under Settings. To do this, you must first click one of the arrows in the triad to specify the direction and then enter the distance under Settings in the PropertyManager, click Apply, and then click Done. The compo- nent will then move the distance you entered along the axis that corresponds to the arrow you selected in the triad. A new explode step will be added to the list, and SolidWorks will get ready to accept your next selection. 6. After you place the subassembly in its new position by releasing the left button of the mouse, a new explode step appears listed in the Explode PropertyManager, and SolidWorks is ready to accept a new selection to create the next exploded step. Click the plus (+) next to the exploded step to see the list of components that were moved (see Figure 12.27). 7. Continue creating exploding steps by dragging other components. Select the shaft from the flyout FeatureManager, and drag it upward by using the green arrow in the triad, just like you did before. Place it just under- neath the shade subassembly but without actually touching it; leave some
  20. 438 C h a p t e r 12 • P u t t i n g I t A l l To g e t h e r : P a r t 2 space between them. Repeat the process for Base, Lamp. As you do this, more steps appear listed in the Explode PropertyManager that by now should look like the one in Figure 12.28. F I g U R e 1 2 . 2 7 First explode step F I g U R e 1 2 . 2 8 List of explode steps so far 8. Hold down Ctrl, and select the custom bearing nut and the electrical cover from the flyout FeatureManager. By holding down Ctrl while selecting, you can drag two or more components together, if you want, even though they aren’t part of a subassembly. Just one triad appears for the two of them to be moved as a unit. Use the green arrow to drag the two components downward this time. This will show up in the list of steps as Explode Step4, and both components will be listed under this step.
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