Windows 7 Resource Kit- P19

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Windows 7 Resource Kit- P19

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  1. FIgURE 19-4 Modifying the locations that are indexed For example, to index the entire system volume, select the check box for this volume (usually C) . This adds the system drive to the list of start addresses for the indexer, with the following default exclusions: ProgramData, Data, AppData, Windows, and CSC . You can override these exclusions by making hidden and system files visible in Windows Explorer and then clicking Show All Locations (as shown in Figure 19-4), expanding the sys- tem volume in the folder tree, and selecting each excluded folder . This is not recommended, however, because adding program and operating system files to the index can slow search queries and degrade the search experience for users . In addition, if the FANCI bit is set on a directory, the directory will appear dimmed, and when you point to it, additional info will be displayed on how to index the contents of that directory (see Figure 19-5) . Managing Indexing CHapTER 19 853 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  2. FIgURE 19-5 Indexing a hidden system folder Configuring Indexing Scopes and Exclusions Using Group policy To specify locations to be indexed by using Group Policy, enable the following policy setting for targeted computers: Computer Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Search \Default Indexed Paths Then configure this policy by specifying the local file system paths for the volumes and directories that you want to include as indexed scopes on the targeted computers . To specify locations to be excluded from indexing by using Group Policy, enable the following policy setting for targeted computers: Computer Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Search \Default Excluded Paths Then configure this policy by specifying the local file system paths for the volumes and directories that you want to exclude from being indexed on the targeted computers . 854 CHapTER 19 Managing Search Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  3. note Users whose computers are targeted by these two policy settings can override them manually using Indexing Options in Control panel. For example, a location that is indexed because of the first Group policy setting can be excluded manually from being indexed by the user. Similarly, a location that is excluded from being indexed because of the second Group policy setting can be included for indexing manually by the user. Configuring Offline Files Indexing Indexing of offline content in the CSC store is enabled by default, but you can disable it by using Indexing Options in Control Panel or by using Group Policy . Only the entire per-user offline cache can be indexed—individual files within the cache cannot be included or excluded from being indexed . Configuring Offline Files Indexing Using Control panel To disable indexing of the Offline Files cache using Indexing Options in Control Panel, follow these steps: 1. Click Modify to open the Indexed Locations dialog box . 2. Clear the check box labeled Offline Files . The preceding procedure disables indexing of offline files for the current user . To disable indexing of offline files for a different user of the computer using Indexing Options in Control Panel, follow these steps: 1. Click Modify to open the Indexed Locations dialog box . 2. Click Show All Locations and respond to the UAC prompt . 3. Clear the check box for the particular user’s Offline Files cache . note To disable offline files indexing for all users of a computer, you must disable it using Group policy, as explained in the next section. Configuring Offline Files Indexing Using Group policy Using Group Policy, you can disable indexing of offline files only for all users of the computer, not for a particular user . To disable indexing of offline files for all users, enable the following policy setting for targeted computers: Computer Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Search \Prevent Indexing Files In Offline Files Cache Managing Indexing CHapTER 19 855 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  4. Configuring Indexing of Encrypted Files Indexing files encrypted using EFS are disabled by default in Windows 7, but you can enable them by using Indexing Options in Control Panel or by using Group Policy . Beginning with Windows 7, indexing the contents of encrypted files is supported, which makes searching en- crypted content as easy as searching unencrypted content . (In Windows 7, the non-encrypted properties of a file are always indexed, regardless of whether the file itself is encrypted .) The only limitation is that users can search only encrypted content stored on the local file systems of their computers, not encrypted content stored on network shares . Prior to Windows Vista SP2, only encrypted files that were made available for offline use could be indexed . iMpoRtAnt If you decide to enable indexing of encrypted content on a computer run- ning Windows 7, Microsoft recommends that you use Windows BitLocker Drive Encryption to encrypt the disk volume on which the index resides on your computer. Microsoft does not recommend using EFS to encrypt the index. Configuring Indexing of Encrypted Files Using Control panel To enable indexing of encrypted files using Indexing Options in Control Panel, follow these steps: 1. Click Advanced to open the Advanced Options properties dialog box . 2. Select the Index Encrypted Files check box . 3. If the disk volume where the index resides is not yet protected by Windows BitLocker, the following warning dialog box is displayed: 4. Click Continue to enable the indexing of encrypted content on your computer . 5. If you use a smart card to access encrypted files, a balloon notification appears above the notification area, indicating that EFS needs your smart card personal identification number (PIN) . Clicking this notification opens a Windows Security dialog box in which you can type the PIN for your smart card . 856 CHapTER 19 Managing Search Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  5. iMpoRtAnt Selecting or clearing the Index Encrypted Files check box rebuilds the index immediately. Depending on how many files you have, this can take up to several hours to complete, and searches might be incomplete while the index is being rebuilt. Configuring Indexing of Encrypted Files Using Group policy To enable indexing of encrypted files using Group Policy, enable the following policy setting for targeted computers: Computer Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Search \Allow Indexing Of Encrypted Files If you enable this policy setting, indexing disregards encryption flags (although access restrictions still apply) and attempts to decrypt and index the content . If you disable this set- ting, the Windows Search service (including third-party features) should not index encrypted items, such as files or e-mails, to avoid indexing encrypted stores . Configuring Indexing of Similar Words By default, words that differ only in diacritics (accents) are considered the same word by the indexer (at least for English and some other languages) . If you want such words to be treated as different words by the indexer, you can use Indexing Options in Control Panel or you can use Group Policy . Note that changing this policy results in a full rebuild of the index because it changes the internal structure of the content index . note The default setting for how diacritics are handled varies by language. For example, the default is Off in English, but it is On in several other languages. Configuring Indexing of Similar Words Using Control panel To cause words that differ only in diacritics to be indexed as different words using Indexing Options in Control Panel, follow these steps: 1. Click Advanced and respond to the UAC prompt to open the Advanced Options properties dialog box . 2. Select the Treat Similar Words With Diacritics As Different Words check box . Configuring Indexing of Similar Words Using Group policy To cause words that differ only in diacritics to be indexed as different words using Group Policy, enable the following policy setting for targeted computers: Computer Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Search \Allow Using Diacritics Managing Indexing CHapTER 19 857 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  6. Configuring Indexing of Text in TIFF Image Documents New in Windows 7 is the ability for users to search for text within TIFF image documents that are compliant with the TIFF 6 .0 specification . This capability uses Optical Character Recognition (OCR) processing and is not enabled by default . iMpoRtAnt Enabling the indexing of text in TIFF image documents can result in signifi- cant processing overhead. Configuring Indexing of Text in TIFF Image Documents Using Control panel To enable the indexing of text in TIFF image documents manually on a computer running Windows 7, perform the following steps: 1. Open Control Panel, click Programs, and then click Turn Windows Features On Or Off . 2. Select the Windows TIFF IFilter check box and click OK . 3. Rebuild the index if you have existing TIFF image documents in the indexing scope on your computer . note If your TIFF image documents are stored on a computer running Windows Server 2008 R2, you can use the add Features Wizard to add the Windows TIFF IFilter feature so you can enable the indexing of text in TIFF image documents stored on the server. Configuring Indexing of Text in TIFF Image Documents Using Group policy You can use Group Policy to configure how indexing text in TIFF image documents takes place . The applicable policy settings are found under: Computer Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Search \OCR\ The policy settings for configuring the indexing of text in TIFF image documents are as follows: n Force TIFF IFilter To Perform OCR For Every Page In A TIFF Document Lets users turn off the performance optimization so that the TIFF IFilter performs OCR for every page in a TIFF document, which allows indexing of all recognized text . By default, the TIFF IFilter optimizes its performance by skipping OCR for document pages that have non-text content (such as photos) . In some cases, pages that contain text can be misclassified as non-text pages . If this is the case, the text in these pages will not be indexed . 858 CHapTER 19 Managing Search Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  7. If you enable this setting, TIFF IFilter will perform OCR for every page in a TIFF docu- ment to index all recognized text . Therefore, the OCR process will be slower . This decrease in performance can be significant if there are a great deal of non-text pages in TIFF documents on the system . If you disable or do not configure this setting, TIFF IFilter optimizes its performance by skipping non-text content during the OCR process . n Select OCR languages From A Code Page This policy setting allows the selection of OCR languages that belong to one of the supported code pages . If you enable this policy setting, the selected OCR languages are used in OCR processing during the indexing of TIFF files . The default system language is ignored unless it is among the selected OCR languages . If you disable or do not configure this policy setting, only the default system language is used . All selected OCR languages must belong to the same code page . If you select languages from more than one code page, the entire OCR language selection is ignored and only the default system language is used . Re-indexing is not initiated when you enable this policy and select OCR languages . This policy setting applies only to the indexing of new files unless re-indexing is initiated manually . Other Index policy Settings Table 19-5 lists some additional policy settings for configuring indexing in Windows 7 . All the policy settings listed in this table are found in the following location: Computer Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Search For detailed information concerning all policy settings for indexing, see the Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows 7 Group Policy Settings Reference, which can be obtained from the Microsoft Download Center at http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/. Policy settings for configuring the user search experience for Windows Explorer in Windows 7 are described in the section titled “Using Search” later in this chapter . TABlE 19-5 Additional Group Policy Settings for Windows Search POlICy DESCRIPTION Prevent Indexing E-mail Enabling this policy setting prevents the indexing of the content Attachments of e-mail attachments . Prevent Indexing Enabling this policy setting prevents the indexing of all Outlook Microsoft Office Outlook items, including messages, contacts, calendar items, notes, and so on . Managing Indexing CHapTER 19 859 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  8. POlICy DESCRIPTION Prevent Indexing Public Enabling this policy setting prevents the indexing of Exchange Folders Server public folders in Outlook 2003 or later versions when the user is running in cached mode and the Download Public Folder Favorites option is turned on . When this policy setting is set to Disabled or Not Configured, Outlook users have the option of indexing cached public folders . Prevent Displaying Enabling this policy setting will prevent users of targeted Advanced Indexing computers from being able to open Indexing Options in Control Options In The Control Panel to locally configure search and indexing settings on their Panel computers . diReCt FRoM tHe SoURCe Indexing and libraries—Hard Disk Drives vs. Removable Storage anton Kucer, Senior program Manager Windows Experience Find & Organize Team I n Windows 7, hard disk drives appear in the Hard Disk Drives location in Windows Explorer. Typical devices in this category include internal and external hard drives. Examples of external hard drives are drives connected via a USB, FireWire, or ESaTa cable to an external port on a pC. all drives that appear under Hard Disk Drives and are formatted as NTFS, FaT, FaT32, or exFaT can be included in a library and added to the indexer. By contrast, devices with removable storage appear in the Devices With Removable Storage category in Windows Explorer. Typical storage devices in this category include DVD drives, CD drives, flash card readers, and USB flash drives. This category is intended to represent devices that have media that can be removed. However, not all devices accurately report supporting removable media. as a result, it is common to see devices in this category that do not have removable media, such as USB flash drives or portable media players such as a Zune or an ipod. Drives or media that appear under Devices With Removable Storage cannot be added to a library or added to the indexer. Understanding Drive letter Assignment Rules To simplify the description of how drive letter assignment rules work, only the following devices are considered: devices that can be externally connected to a pC, require only one drive letter, and are not floppy disk, CD, or DVD drives. For a complete description of drive letter assignments, see the following: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/234048. 860 CHapTER 19 Managing Search Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  9. When a device that will be assigned a drive letter is attached to Windows for the first time, it is assigned the next available letter (that is, one that is not currently being used for an attached device or resource) starting with C. If the drive is removed and then reattached, Windows assigns the same drive letter unless that drive letter has been recycled for use with a different device or resource. If the drive letter has been recycled, the device once again is assigned the next available drive letter starting with C. For example, let‘s say that before any external devices are attached, the computer has two hard disk drives (C and D) and a DVD/CD-RW drive (G). When an external drive is plugged in for the first time, the lowest available drive letter (E) is assigned to External Drive 1. If External Drive 1 is unplugged and External Drive 2 is plugged in, drive letter E is recycled and assigned to External Drive 2. If External drive 1 is then plugged back in again, it is assigned a new drive letter, F. as long as drive letters are not recycled (for example, due to a new device being plugged in while one of the other devices is unplugged), both external drives can be removed and added in any order and they maintain their current drive letters. For example, if both external drives are removed and then External Drive 1 is plugged back in, it is still assigned the drive letter F. Drive letter Assignment and Its Impact on Indexing The indexer does not support tracking indexed locations via a unique ID. Indexed locations are just tracked via their Uniform Resource Identifier (for example, file:/// F:\Music). The indexer has the following limitations when it is indexing a location on a drive and the drive letter changes: n When a drive letter changes, the indexer does not have the ability to dynami- cally update the path information for indexed items. For example, if the location E:\Music from External Drive 1 is added to the indexer and External Drive 1 is later assigned the drive letter F, the indexer does not recognize F:\Music as a location that should be indexed. Instead, it maintains the old index scope, E:\Music. n When the drive letter is assigned to a new drive, the indexer is able to detect that content has changed. If the new drive is supported, it removes all indexed content from the old drive and attempts to index the new drive. Drive letter Assignment and Its Impact on libraries Libraries also do not support tracking locations that have been added to them via a unique ID. However, they do store additional information about locations, such as creation time, and they have link tracking functionality that can use this information to resolve locations in many cases when drive letters have changed, as follows: Managing Indexing CHapTER 19 861 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  10. n Link tracking can resolve locations in cases in which folders are added to a library and drive letters have changed as a result. When this occurs, the library is updated to point to the new location (for example, E:\Music gets updated to F:\Music). additionally, the library notifies the indexer to remove the old location (in this case, E:\Music) and add the new location (F:\Music). n Libraries do not resolve locations when drive letters change after the root of a drive has been added to a library. Behavior When a Drive Is Not Available When an external drive is no longer available (for example, it is unplugged from the computer) after a location from the drive has been added to a library and the in- dexer and the drive letter have not been recycled, the indexer trims any results from that location for any queries that are sent to it. The indexing control panel shows the location as being indexed but identifies it as unavailable. Best Practices for Using External Hard Drives with libraries Best practices when using external hard drives with libraries include: n attaching all drives that you will use with the computer at the same time prevents the recycling of drive letters. n Do not add a device that is assigned a or B drive letters to a library. The indexing of these drive letters is not supported and prevents the addition of these locations to a library. Note that Windows 7 will never automatically assign drive letter a or B to an external drive. You would need to have manually forced assignment of these drive letters (for example, via the Disk Management console). Mitigating Drive letter Recycling The resolutions given previously, in which you need to manually remove a location and then add a location back to resolve issues caused by drive letter recycling, need to be done only once in most cases. However, after the root of a drive is added to a library, there can be situations in which its drive letter is continually recycled. For example, suppose that a user has two external hard drives that are never attached to the computer at the same time. One hard drive (External Drive 1) is attached to the laptop only when the user is at work, and the other hard drive (External Drive 2) is attached to the laptop only when the user goes home. When External Drive 1 is plugged in, it is assigned drive letter E; and whenever External Drive 2 is plugged in, it is also assigned drive letter E. So if E\ from External Drive 1 is added to a library, every time External Drive 2 is plugged in, it shows up in the library instead. Each time this occurs, the indexer ends up re-indexing the entire drive. 862 CHapTER 19 Managing Search Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  11. One solution for this problem is to plug both drives into the system at the same time. If this isn’t possible, the other solution is to manually assign a higher drive letter to one or both of the drives. For example, using the Disk Management con- sole, you could assign the drive letter S to External Drive 2. picking a high drive let- ter significantly reduces the possibility that the drive letter will be recycled. picking a letter in the middle of the alphabet is best because Windows assigns drive letters from the end of the alphabet for mapped drives by default. Using Search Managing the search experience for users mainly requires educating them about the powerful new search capabilities built into Windows 7 . The sections that follow provide an overview of these search capabilities and how to configure the search experience for users using Group Policy . Configuring Search Using Folder Options With the new Search tab found in Folder Options in Control Panel (see Figure 19-6), users can configure different aspects of the Windows Search experience to meet their needs, including what to search, how to search, and what should happen when searching nonindexed loca- tions within Windows Explorer . FIgURE 19-6 Configuring your search experience using the Search tab found in Folder Options in Control Panel Using Search CHapTER 19 863 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  12. Configuring What to Search By default, Windows 7 Search is configured to search for both file names and the contents of files when searching indexed locations . When searching nonindexed locations, only file names are searched . For example, searching the %Windir% folder for log will return all files and sub- folders under %Windir% that satisfy any of these conditions: n The files are named “log” or “Log” (the function is case insensitive) . n The file names use log as a prefix . This means, for example, that searching for log might return logger, logarithm, or even fire-log (the hyphen acts as a word separator), but it won’t return blog or firelog because these file names do not have log as a prefix . n The files have the .log file extension . To perform such a search, open Windows Explorer, select the C:\Windows directory in the navigation pane, and type log in the Search box at the upper-right part of the window (see Figure 19-7) . Note that the %Windir% folder is not indexed by default, so searching this folder is slow because it uses the grep method instead of the Windows Search service . (This method was used by the Search Assistant in Windows XP .) On the other hand, searching the user’s Documents library returns results almost instantaneously because the user’s Documents library is indexed by default and the Windows Search service simply has to query the catalog to obtain the results . FIgURE 19-7 Results of searching the nonindexed %Windir% directory for the search string log By selecting Always Search File Names And Contents (This Might Take Several Minutes) under What To Search on the Search tab of the Folder Options window, users can modify this default search behavior so that Windows searches for both file names and the contents of files, even when searching locations that are not being indexed . Note that doing this can slow down the search process considerably for such locations . A better approach is to mark these 864 CHapTER 19 Managing Search Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  13. locations for indexing . As shown in Figure 19-7, searching a nonindexed folder using Windows Explorer causes a yellow notification bar to be displayed that says “Searching might be slow for nonindexed locations: foldername . Click to add to index .” By clicking this notification bar and selecting Add To Index, users can cause the selected folder to be added to the indexing scope on their computer . Configuring How To Search The following options configure how searching is performed: n Include Subfolders In Search Results When Searching In File Folders This option is enabled by default and causes Windows to search within subfolders when you search from any Windows Explorer window . Clearing this option will cause Windows to search only within the selected folder . n Find Partial Matches This option is enabled by default and causes Windows to display results as you type your search . For example, if you type fi in the Search box on the Start menu, one of the results returned will be “Windows Firewall” because the second word in this program name begins with fi . If you disable this option, however, you will need to type the entire word Firewall before it will be displayed in your search results . n Use Natural language Search Selecting this option causes Windows to interpret the search string as natural language . For example, searching for “e-mail from Karen” would return all mail messages received from users named Karen . n Don’t Use The Index When Searching In File Folders For System Files (Searches Might Take longer) Selecting this option causes Windows to always use the slower grep method for searching file names . The contents of files are not searched when this is selected and the setting Always Search File Names And Contents (Might Be Slow) is also selected . Configuring What Happens When Searching Nonindexed Locations Users can enable the following search behaviors when they search nonindexed locations: n Include System Directories Selecting this option causes system directories to be included when searching a volume or folder using the grep method of searching . Note that beginning with Windows 7, this option is selected by default . n Included Compressed Files (zIP, CAB…) Selecting this option causes compressed files to have their contents searched both for matching file names and matching con- tent within these files . Using Search CHapTER 19 865 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  14. Using Start Menu Search Start Menu Search has been enhanced significantly in Windows 7 compared with how it was implemented in Windows Vista . These numerous enhancements now make Start Menu Search a universal entry point that users can use to find programs, settings, and files quickly and easily . For example, in Windows Vista, the results from Start Menu Search were hard-coded into four groups: Programs, Favorites And History, Communications, and Files . Beginning with Windows 7, however, these groups have changed to include Control Panel, Libraries, and all indexed locations, with Programs and Control Panel having the highest priority and with Favorites And History and Communications removed altogether . For example, Figure 19-8 shows a Start Menu Search for the string remote that returns two programs, several Control Panel items, and a number of documents and other types of files . FIgURE 19-8 Start Menu Search now returns Programs, Control Panel items, and other types of files . Clicking a group heading now returns all search results for that group . For example, Figure 19-9 shows that clicking the Documents heading opens Windows Explorer and displays the search results returned from the Documents library for this search string . Using the Start menu is now the best way to find a particular Control Panel setting quickly . For example, if you want to change the display settings on your computer, simply type display in the Start Menu Search box, and the setting you are looking for is usually one of the results listed . Figure 19-10 illustrates that items listed in the Control Panel group of Start Menu Search results include not only Control Panel utilities, such as the Display applet, but also Control Panel actions, such as Change Display Settings . This enhancement makes using Start Menu Search a much faster way to find configuration settings for your computer than browsing Control Panel . 866 CHapTER 19 Managing Search Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  15. FIgURE 19-9 Clicking the Documents heading returns all documents that contain the string remote in the file name or document contents . FIgURE 19-10 Searching how to change display settings using Start Menu Search Using Search CHapTER 19 867 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  16. Re-scope links can be displayed at the bottom of the Start Menu Search results to allow users to re-scope their search to other locations quickly . In Figure 19-10, the re-scope link See More Results is pinned by default, and clicking this link opens Windows Explorer and reruns the query against all indexed locations . Up to three additional re-scope links can be pinned to the Start menu using Group Policy . You can pin the following types of re-scope links: n Search The Internet Reruns the query using the default Web browser and the default search engine n Custom library link Reruns the query against the specified library using Windows Explorer n Search connector link Reruns the query against the specified federated location via a search connector using Windows Explorer n Custom Internet search site link Reruns the query against a specified Internet or intranet site that supports the OpenSearch standard using the default Web browser The following Group Policy settings are new in Windows 7 and are used to pin or unpin re-scope links to the Start menu: n Add Search Internet link To Start Menu Allows users to re-scope searches to their default Internet search engine when searching from the Start menu . This policy setting is found in the following location: User Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\Start Menu And Taskbar n Pin Internet Search Sites To The “Search Again” links And The Start Menu Allows users to resend searches to customized Internet or intranet sites from Windows Explorer and the Start menu . This policy setting is found in the following location: User Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Explorer n Pin library And Search Connectors To The “Search Again” links And The Start Menu Allows users to re-scope searches to customized Library or Search Connector locations from Windows Explorer and the Start menu . This policy setting is found in the following location: User Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Explorer n Remove See More Results/Search Everywhere link Hides the See More Results/ Search Everywhere link on the Start menu . This policy setting is found in the following location: User Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\Start Menu And Taskbar MoRe inFo For additional information on how Start Menu Search works in Windows 7 and the groups of results that can be displayed, see the Windows Search, browse, and Organize Administrator‘s Guide found on Microsoft TechNet at http://technet.microsoft.com /en-us/library/dd744681.aspx. 868 CHapTER 19 Managing Search Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  17. Searching Libraries Libraries are a new feature of Windows 7 that makes it easier for users to organize and search for documents and other types of files . Libraries allow files from multiple storage locations to be browsed and searched as if they were stored in a single location . For example, the Docu- ments Library on a user‘s computer could contain: n The user‘s own My Documents folder (included by default) . n The Public Documents folder on the user‘s computer (included by default) . n Additional volumes or folders on the user‘s computer . n Shared folders on the network . Libraries are integrated fully in Windows 7 with fast, full-content search and provide cus- tomized filter search suggestions based on the types of files the library contains . Figure 19-11 shows the Documents library on a user‘s computer where one of the library locations is the network share \\SEA-DC1\Documentation . FIgURE 19-11 This Documents library includes files located on a network share . Typing a search string into the search box in the upper right section of Windows Explorer searches the Documents library for the text specified . As Figure 19-12 shows, the results returned include highlighting of file names that contain the search string and snippets of text from documents that contain the search string . Using Search CHapTER 19 869 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  18. FIgURE 19-12 Results returned when searching the Documents library As Figure 19-12 shows, clicking within the Search box allows you to use filters to narrow your search for documents that have a specific Author, Size, Date Modified, or Type . Figure 19-13 shows that a history of previously tried queries is also displayed to allow you to rerun a query quickly if you want . FIgURE 19-13 Narrow your search using search filters or rerun a previous query . The search filters displayed vary depending upon the type of library being searched . For example, searching the Music library provides search filters for searching by Album, Artist, Genre, or Length . Search filters are a new feature in Windows 7 that make it easier for users to construct queries using AQS, which could only be entered manually when creating search strings in Windows Vista . For more information on AQS, see the sidebar “How It Works: Ad- vanced Query Syntax“ later in this chapter . 870 CHapTER 19 Managing Search Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  19. Once you perform a search, you can save it so you can run it again in the future . To save your search, click the Save Search button on the toolbar . Windows automatically suggests a name for your saved search based on your search string and any filters you selected . Figure 19-14 shows a saved search named config type=.doc sizelarge.search-ms, whose name was constructed as follows: n Search string: “config” n Type: .doc file (Microsoft Office Word document) n Size: large (1–16 MB) FIgURE 19-14 Saving a search as a * .search-ms file Saved searches are saved by default in the Searches subfolder of your user profile and have .search-ms as their file extension . Saved searches are displayed under Favorites in the naviga- tion pane of Windows Explorer . To rerun a saved search, simply select it in Windows Explorer (as shown in Figure 19-15) . FIgURE 19-15 Rerunning a saved search by selecting it in the navigation pane of Windows Explorer Using Search CHapTER 19 871 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  20. If searching the Documents library doesn‘t return the result you are looking for, you can broaden your search focus to other libraries, the entire computer, or even the Internet by selecting one of the re-scope links shown at the bottom of your search results . For example, by clicking the Computer link, you can re-scope your search to files stored in any location on your computer (as shown in Figure 19-16) . You can even define a custom scope for this search only by clicking the Custom link and specifying the locations, both local and network, that you want to search . FIgURE 19-16 You can broaden the focus of your search to your entire computer or other locations using re-scope links . note To quickly search all indexed locations on a computer running Windows 7, press the Windows Logo key+F and type your search string. Other methods for doing this in- clude pressing Ctrl+F from any Windows Explorer window and clicking Start, followed by pressing F3. The re-scope links displayed at the bottom of the search results in Windows Explorer can be customized by administrators using Group Policy . The following Group Policy settings are new in Windows 7 and are used to customize the re-scope links displayed in Windows Explorer: n Pin Internet Search Sites To The “Search Again” links And The Start Menu Allows users to resend searches to customized Internet or intranet sites from Windows Explorer and the Start menu . This policy setting is found in the following location: User Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Windows Explorer 872 CHapTER 19 Managing Search Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
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