Windows 7 Resource Kit- P29

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Windows 7 Resource Kit- P29

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  1. When enabling Remote Desktop on a computer, you must also authorize which users will be allowed to remotely connect to that computer using RDC . By default, only administrators are authorized to remotely connect to the host computer . Authorize additional users by fol- lowing these steps: 1. Click the Select Users button to open the Remote Desktop Users dialog box . 2. Click Add and then either specify or find user accounts in AD DS (or on the local com- puter on stand-alone host computers) and add them to the list of Remote Desktop Users authorized to access the host computer using Remote Desktop . This adds the selected users to the Remote Desktop Users local group on the host computer . Enabling Remote Desktop Using Group policy You can also use Group Policy to enable Remote Desktop on host computers . To enable Remote Desktop on all computers in a specified organizational unit (OU), open the Group Policy object (GPO) linked to the OU using Group Policy Object Editor, enable the following policy setting and add users to the Remote Desktop Users group: Computer Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\Windows Components \Remote Desktop Services\Remote Desktop Session Host\Connections\Allow Users To Connect Remotely Using Remote Desktop Services Enabling Remote Desktop on computers using Group Policy also enables the Allow Con- nections From Computers Running Any Version Of Remote Desktop (Less Secure) option on the computers targeted by the GPO . To enable Remote Desktop using the Allow Connections Only From Computers Running Remote Desktop With Network Level Authentication (More Secure) option instead, you must enable the following policy setting in addition to the preceding one: Computer Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\Windows Components \Remote Desktop Services\Remote Desktop Session Host\Security\Require User Authentication For Remote Connections By Using Network Level Authentication note By default, when the first policy setting is enabled but the second setting is not configured, local administrators on the targeted computers have the ability to change the Remote Desktop security level on their computers to allow Connections Only From Computers Running Remote Desktop With Network Level authentication (More Secure) if desired. When the second policy setting is enabled, the option allow Connections From Computers Running any Version Of Remote Desktop (Less Secure) on the Remote tab is unavailable and appears dimmed. Using Remote Desktop CHapTER 27 1353 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  2. Configuring and Deploying Remote Desktop Connection After you have enabled Remote Desktop on the host computer, you must configure the RDC client software on the client computer . You can configure RDC in several ways: n Click Start, click All Programs, click Accessories, and then click Remote Desktop Connection . This opens the Remote Desktop Connection UI, shown in Figure 27-10 . n Type mstsc at a command prompt or in the Search box to open the Remote Desktop Connection UI, or type mstsc followed by various parameters to customize how the RDC client software will run . For help with Mstsc .exe parameters, type mstsc /? at a command prompt . n Use Notepad to manually edit an * .rdp file previously saved from the Remote Desktop Connection UI . For more information, read the section titled “Configuring Remote Desktop Connection Using Notepad” later in this chapter . n Configure those Remote Desktop Services Group Policy settings that apply to Remote Desktop . FIgURE 27-10 The Remote Desktop Connection client UI shows configuration options both hid- den and displayed . Table 27-9 summarizes the configuration options available on the different tabs of the Remote Desktop Connection client UI . 1354 CHapTER 27 Connecting Remote Users and Networks Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  3. TABlE 27-9 Configuration Options for Remote Desktop Connection Client TAB SETTINg NOTES General Logon Settings: Computer Specifies the FQDN or IP address (can be IPv4 or IPv6) of the host computer . Logon Settings: User Name Specifies the user account to be used to establish the Remote Desktop session . This is displayed only when credentials from previous Remote Desktop sessions have been saved . Logon Settings: Always Select this check box to require the user to Ask For Credentials always supply credentials . This is displayed only when credentials from previous Remote Desktop sessions have been saved . Connection Settings Saves the current configuration of RDC client as an * .rdp file or opens a previously saved * .rdp file . Display Display Configuration Changes the size of your remote desktop . Use All My Monitors For Configures the Remote Desktop session The Remote Session monitor layout to match the current client-side configuration . Colors Specifies color depth for your remote desktop . Display The Connection Makes it easier to use Remote Desktop in full- Bar When In Full-Screen screen mode without needing to remember Mode keyboard shortcuts . Local Remote Audio Controls where remote audio is played back Resources and whether it should be recorded . Keyboard Specifies how Windows key combinations, such as Alt+Tab, behave when used from within a Remote Desktop session . Local Devices And Prints to network computers connected to Resources: Printers the host computer from within the Remote Desktop session without having to install additional drivers . Local Devices And Shares a clipboard between the client and host Resources: Clipboard computers . Local Devices And Redirects additional devices local to the host Resources: More computer to the remote client including serial ports, smart cards, disk drives, and supported PnP devices such as media players and digital cameras . Using Remote Desktop CHapTER 27 1355 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  4. TAB SETTINg NOTES Programs Start A Program Specifies a program that should automatically start when your Remote Desktop session is established . Experience Performance: Choose Your Specifies the connection speed closest to Connection Speed To actual available network bandwidth to obtain Optimize Performance the optimal mix of functionality and perfor- mance for your Remote Desktop session . Desktop Background Enables or disables each desktop user Font Smoothing interface feature that is indicated . Desktop Composition Show Window Contents While Dragging Menu And Window Animation Visual Styles Persistent Bitmap Caching Reconnect If Connection Is Specifies that the RDC client should attempt Dropped to re-establish a connection with the remote host if the connection between them is unexpectedly terminated . Advanced Server Authentication: Specifies whether unauthenticated Remote Authentication Options Desktop sessions should be allowed; if they are allowed, specify whether a warning mes- sage should be displayed . For more informa- tion, see the sidebar titled “Remote Desktop Connection Server Authentication” later in this chapter . Connect From Anywhere: Configures Remote Desktop Gateway (RD Settings Gateway) settings to allow RDC clients to connect to remote computers behind corporate firewalls . note In enterprise environments, administrators can also preconfigure RDC client con- figurations and save them as Remote Desktop files (*.rdp files). These *.rdp files can then be deployed to users as e-mail attachments or copied from a network share using a logon script. 1356 CHapTER 27 Connecting Remote Users and Networks Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  5. Remote Desktop Connection Server Authentication R DC includes a Server authentication setting that ensures that you are connecting to the remote computer or server that you intend to connect to. To configure Server authentication for an RDC, open the properties dialog box of your connection, click the advanced tab, and click Settings. Then select one of the following three options: n Connect And Don’t Warn Me (least Secure) Lets you connect even if RDC can’t verify the identity of the remote computer. n Warn Me (More Secure) Lets you choose whether to continue with the connection when RDC can’t verify the identity of the remote computer. n Do Not Connect (Most Secure) prevents you from connecting to the remote computer when RDC can’t verify the remote computer’s identity. The default setting for Server authentication is Warn Me. Configuring Remote Desktop Connection from the Command Line To use the RDC client from the command line or custom shortcut, type mstsc followed by the appropriate command-line switches . For example, to initiate a Remote Desktop session using a custom display resolution of 1680 × 1050, type mstsc /w:1680 /h:1050 at a command prompt . You can use the /span switch to initiate a Remote Desktop session that spans across multiple monitors . Note that when both the /span and /h: /w: switches are present, the /span switch takes precedence . In addition, when the /span option is selected, the slider for adjust- ing remote desktop size is unavailable on the Display tab so that users cannot change their initial settings, which can cause confusion . New in Windows 7 is the /multimon switch, which configures the Remote Desktop session monitor layout to match the current client-side configuration . Using the /public switch runs Remote Desktop in public mode . When an RDC client is run- ning in public mode, it does not persist any private user data (such as user name, password, domain, and so on) either to disk or to the registry on the computer on which the client is running, nor does the client make use of any saved private data that may exist on the com- puter (a trusted sites list, the persistent bitmap cache, and so on) . This means that the client essentially functions as if there were no registry or secondary storage present for storing pri- vate data . A client running in public mode still honors Group Policy settings, however . Finally, the /console switch used in previous versions of Mstsc .exe was removed in Windows Vista SP1 and has been replaced with the /admin switch . For more information about this, see the fol- lowing sidebar, titled “Direct from the Source: Replacement of /console by /admin .” Using Remote Desktop CHapTER 27 1357 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  6. note For more help with Mstsc.exe parameters, type mstsc /? at a command prompt. diReCt FRoM tHe SoURCe Replacement of /console by /admin Mahesh Lotlikar, SDE II Remote Desktop Services Team I n Windows Server 2003, the /console option for Mstsc.exe was used for several purposes. With the introduction of the /admin option in Windows Vista Sp1 and Windows Server 2008, the /console option has now been deprecated. The follow- ing examples illustrate the /console switch’s significance in previous versions of Windows and why the scenario does not apply for Windows 7, Windows Vista Sp1 or later versions, Windows Server 2008, and Windows Server 2008 R2. First, in earlier versions of Windows such as Windows Xp and Windows Server 2003, the /console option was used to connect to the session on the physical console (session 0), because some applications could not install and run in any session other than session 0. In Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008, the Windows features are re-architected, so that only services run in session 0 and applications do not need to run in session 0. Therefore, the administrator does not need the /console option for this purpose. Second, in earlier versions of Windows, the /console option was also used for the purpose of reconnecting to and resuming work in the user session on the physical console. In Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008, this option is not required to reconnect to the existing session on the physical console. (The blog post referenced at the end of this sidebar includes details on console behavior differences.) Third, in Windows Server 2003, the /console option was used for administering the Remote Desktop Session Host remotely without consuming a client access license (CaL). In Windows Server 2008, /admin option serves this purpose. Thus, you do not need the /console option while connecting to Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008, and you can now use the /admin switch to connect to the physical console of Windows Vista or Windows Server 2003. For more information, see the following post on the Remote Desktop Services Team Blog: http://blogs.msdn.com/ts/archive/2007/12/17/changes-to-remote- administration-in-windows-server-2008.aspx. 1358 CHapTER 27 Connecting Remote Users and Networks Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  7. Configuring Remote Desktop Connection Using Notepad You can also configure a saved RDC client by opening its * .rdp file in Notepad and editing it . For example, to configure a saved RDC client to use a custom display resolution of 1680 × 1050, change the lines specifying screen resolution to read as follows . desktopwidth:i:1680 desktopheight:i:1050 As a second example, to configure a saved RDC client to span a Remote Desktop session across multiple monitors, add or change the following line: span:i:0 to span:i:1 Configuring Remote Desktop Using Group policy You can also use Group Policy to manage some aspects of how Remote Desktop works . You can find the policy settings for managing Remote Desktop in two locations: n Per-computer policy settings can be found under Computer Configuration\Policies \Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Remote Desktop Services n Per-user policy settings can be found under User Configuration\Policies\Administrative Templates\Windows Components\Remote Desktop Services Table 27-10 lists Group Policy settings that affect Remote Desktop . Policies that were introduced earlier in Windows Vista are marked with an asterisk (*), and policies that are new in Windows 7 are marked with two asterisks (**) . (Additional policy settings found in these locations apply only to Remote Desktop Session Hosts or only when an RDC client is used to connect to a Remote Desktop Session Host .) If a computer and user policy setting are identi- cal, the computer setting takes precedence if configured . To use the Group Policy settings in this table, configure them in a GPO linked to an OU where the host computers (the computers that have Remote Desktop enabled) are located . For additional Group Policy settings that affect Remote Desktop, see the section titled “Enabling Remote Desktop Using Group Policy” earlier in this chapter . note The folder layout of the Group policy settings for Remote Desktop Services—under Computer Configuration\policies\administrative Templates\Windows Components\Remote Desktop Services and User Configuration\policies\administrative Templates\Windows Components\Remote Desktop Services—has been reorganized in Windows 7 for ease of discoverability, but the registry keys are still the same. all policy settings common to both Windows Vista and Windows Xp, even if located under different folders, will still be applied to all computers in the targeted OU. Using Remote Desktop CHapTER 27 1359 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  8. TABlE 27-10 Group Policy Settings That Affect Remote Desktop FOlDER POlICy SETTINg NOTES Remote Desktop Do Not Allow Prevents users from saving their credentials Connection Client Passwords To Be in the RDC client . Windows Vista saves the Saved password using Credential Manager instead of saving it within the * .rdp file as in earlier versions of Windows . Remote Desktop Automatic Enables RDC clients to attempt to automati- Session Reconnection cally reconnect when underlying network Host\Connections connectivity is lost . Allow Users To Enables Remote Desktop on the targeted Connect Remotely computer . Using Remote Desktop Services Deny Logoff Of An Prevents an administrator on the client Administrator Logged computer from bumping an administrator In To The Console off of the host computer . Session Remote Desktop Allow Audio And Enables redirection of the remote computer’s Session Host\Device Video Playback audio and video output in a Remote and Resource Redirection Desktop session . (This policy was named Redirection Allow Audio Redirection in Windows Vista and earlier versions .) Allow Audio Enables recording of audio to the remote Recording computer during a Remote Desktop session . Redirection **Limit Audio Enables limiting of audio quality to improve Playback Quality the performance of a Remote Desktop session over a slow link . Do Not Allow Prevents sharing of a clipboard . Clipboard Redirection Do Not Allow COM Prevents redirection of serial port devices . Port Redirection Do Not Allow Drive Prevents redirection of disk drive resources . Redirection Do Not Allow LPT Prevents redirection of parallel port devices . Port Redirection *Do Not Allow Prevents redirection of supported PnP Supported Plug media players and digital cameras . And Play Device Redirection 1360 CHapTER 27 Connecting Remote Users and Networks Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  9. FOlDER POlICy SETTINg NOTES Do Not Allow Smart Prevents redirection of smart card readers . Card Device Redirec- tion Remote Desktop Do Not Set Default Prevents users from redirecting print jobs Session Host\Printer Client Printer To Be from the remote computer to a printer Redirection Default Printer In A attached to their local (client) computer . Session Do Not Allow Client Prevents the client default printer from Printer Redirection automatically being set as the default printer for the Remote Desktop session . Remote Desktop Limit Maximum Color Enables specifying a maximum color Session Host\Remote Depth depth to improve performance of a Remote Session Environment Desktop session over a slow link . **Limit Maximum Enables specifying a maximum display Display Resolution resolution to improve performance of a Remote Desktop session over a slow link . **Limit Maximum Enables specifying a maximum number Number Of Monitors of monitors to improve performance of a Remote Desktop session over a slow link . **Optimize Visual Enables optimizing the Remote Desktop Experience For session for either multimedia or text . Remote Desktop Services Sessions Enforce Removal Prevents wallpaper from being displayed in Of Remote Desktop the Remote Desktop session . Wallpaper Remove “Disconnect” Removes the Disconnect button from the Option From Shut Start menu but doesn’t prevent the remote Down Dialog user from disconnecting the session using other methods . Remote Desktop Set Client Connection Specifies the level of encryption used to Session Host\Security Encryption Level protect RDP traffic between the client and host computers . The options available are High (128-bit), Low (56-bit), and Client Compatible (highest encryption level supported by the client) . When this policy setting is Not Configured, the default encryption level used is Client Compatible . Using Remote Desktop CHapTER 27 1361 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  10. FOlDER POlICy SETTINg NOTES Always Prompt For Requires remote users to always enter a Password Upon password to establish a Remote Desktop Connection session with the targeted computer . *Require Use Of Specifies whether the client should attempt Specific Security to authenticate the host computer during Layer For Remote establishment of the Remote Desktop ses- (RDP) Connections sion . The options available are: n DP, which means that no computer- level authentication is required . n SSL (TLS 1 .0), which means that the client tries to use Kerberos or certificates to authenticate the host computer; if this fails, the session is not established . n Negotiate, which first attempts to authenticate the host using Kerberos or certificates; if this fails, the session is still established . When this policy setting is Not Configured, the default authentication method used is Negotiate . *Require User Requires client computers to be running Authentication For Windows Vista or Windows XP SP2 with the Remote Connections downloadable RDC 6 .0 client installed . (This By Using Network policy was named Require User Authentica- Level Authentication tion Using RDP 6 .0 For Remote Connections in Windows Vista and earlier versions .) *Server Authenti- Lets you specify a certificate template to be cation Certificate used for authenticating the host computer . Template Remote Desktop Terminate Session Forcibly logs the remote user off of the Session Host\Session When Time Limits Remote Desktop session when the session Time Limits Are Reached time limit has been reached . Set Time Limit Forcibly logs the remote user off of the For Disconnected Remote Desktop session when the session Sessions time limit for disconnected sessions has been reached . 1362 CHapTER 27 Connecting Remote Users and Networks Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  11. FOlDER POlICy SETTINg NOTES Set Time Limit For Specifies a time limit for no activity in Active But Idle Remote Desktop sessions . When the time Remote Desktop limit is reached, the session is disconnected, Services Sessions but the remote user is not logged off . If, however, the Terminate Session When Time Limits Are Reached policy is enabled, the user is disconnected and then forcibly logged off . Set Time Limit For Specifies a time limit for Remote Desktop Active Remote sessions . When the time limit is reached, the Desktop Services session is disconnected, but the remote user Sessions is not logged off . If, however, the Terminate Session When Time Limits Are Reached policy is enabled, the user is disconnected and then forcibly logged off . Establishing a Remote Desktop Session After the host computer has been configured to enable Remote Desktop for authorized users and the RDP client software has been configured and deployed on the client computer, the user can initiate establishment of a Remote Desktop session with the remote host computer by using one of the following methods: n Double-click the desired * .rdp file (or a shortcut to this file) and (if required) click Yes . Then specify your credentials for connecting to the host computer (if required) . n Open a command prompt and type mstsc rdp_file, where rdp_file is the name of the desired * .rdp file (specifying the path may be required) and (if required) click Yes . Then specify your credentials for connecting to the host computer, if required . When a Remote Desktop session has been established, the client can end the session in two ways: n By disconnecting This ends the Remote Desktop experience on the client computer but leaves the session running on the host computer so that the client can reconnect later if desired . Any applications running in the session on the host continue to run until this session is terminated, either by the user on the client (who must reconnect and then log off) or by a user logging on interactively to the host . n By logging off This ends the Remote Desktop experience on the client computer and terminates the session on the host computer as well . Using Remote Desktop CHapTER 27 1363 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  12. note You can also remotely shut down the host computer to which you are remotely connected, or you can put it into Sleep mode. To do this from within a Remote Desktop session, click the taskbar, press alt+F4, and then choose the option you want to select. You can also open a command prompt in your Remote Desktop session and type shutdown -s -t 0 to immediately shut down the host computer or shutdown -r -t 0 to immediately restart it. (Be sure to save any open files first.) Improving Remote Desktop performance If available network bandwidth between a client computer and the remote host computer is limited, you can improve a Remote Desktop experience by reducing the color depth on the Display tab of the RDC client from its default 32-bit value . You can also selectively disable desktop experiences on the Experience tab to further improve Remote Desktop performance . If you routinely transfer large files, submit large print jobs, or perform other bandwidth- intensive actions over a Remote Desktop connection, you may be able to improve the per- formance of a Remote Desktop experience by configuring display data prioritization on the host computer . Display data prioritization is designed to ensure that the screen performance aspect of a Remote Desktop experience is not adversely affected by such bandwidth-intensive actions . Display data prioritization works by automatically controlling virtual channel traffic between the client and host computer by giving display, keyboard, and mouse data higher priority than other forms of traffic . The default setting for display data prioritization is to allocate 70 percent of available bandwidth for input (keyboard and mouse) and output (display) data . All other traffic, includ- ing use of a shared clipboard, file transfers, print jobs, and so on, is allocated by default only 30 percent of the available bandwidth of the network connection . You can manually configure display data prioritization settings by editing the registry on a host computer running Windows Vista or later versions . The registry entries for display data pri- oritization are the following values, which are found under HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet \Services\TermDD . (If these DWORD values are not present, you can create them .) n FlowControlDisable Set this value to 1 to disable all display data prioritization and handle all requests on a first-in-first-out (FIFO) basis . The default value of this setting is 0 . n FlowControlDisplayBandwidth Specify a relative bandwidth priority for display and input data up to an allowed value of 255 . The default value of this setting is 70 . n FlowControlChannelBandwidth Specify a relative bandwidth priority for all other virtual channels up to an allowed value of 255 . The default value of this setting is 30 . n FlowControlChargePostCompression Determine whether flow control will calcu- late bandwidth allocation based on pre-compression bytes (if the value is 0) or post- compression bytes (if the value is 1) . The default value for this setting is 0 . 1364 CHapTER 27 Connecting Remote Users and Networks Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  13. By default, the ratio of FlowControlDisplayBandwidth to FlowControlChannelBandwidth is 70 to 30 or 70:30 . This means that 70 percent of available bandwidth is reserved for display and input traffic, and the remaining 30 percent will be used for other types of traffic . If your Remote Desktop experience is being degraded during large file transfers and other bandwidth-intensive activity, you might change FlowControlDisplayBandwidth to 85 and FlowControlChannelBandwidth to 15, which allocates 85 percent of available bandwidth for display and input traffic while reserving only 15 percent for other traffic . note You must reboot your host computer for these registry changes to take effect. Troubleshooting Remote Desktop Sessions If you have trouble establishing a Remote Desktop session with the host computer, do the following: n Verify that Remote Desktop has been enabled on the host computer . n Verify that you are using credentials that have been authorized for remotely connecting to the host computer . n Verify that you have the correct FQDN or IP address of the remote computer . n Verify network connectivity with the remote computer by using the ping command . If you are missing expected functionality during a Remote Desktop session, do the following: n Check whether the host computer is running an older version of Windows such as Windows XP Professional Edition or Windows Server 2003 . n Verify that you have the latest version of Remote Desktop Connection client software installed on your computer . n Verify that Group Policy is not locking down some aspect of Remote Desktop function- ality that you expected to experience . note For additional troubleshooting guidance, read Chapter 31, “Troubleshooting Net- work Issues.” When working through the troubleshooting processes in this chapter, keep in mind that RDp uses TCp port 3389. Configuring and Using Remoteapp and Desktop Connection RemoteApp and Desktop Connection requires configuration on both the server and client side . On the server side, you need a Windows Server 2008 R2 server that has the Remote Desktop Services role installed together with the following role services: Using Remote Desktop CHapTER 27 1365 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  14. n Remote Desktop Session Host n Remote Desktop Web Access n Remote Desktop Connection Broker In addition, if you want users on client computers to also be able to connect to virtual machines using RemoteApp and Desktop Connection, you must install the Remote Desktop Virtualization Host role service, which also requires installing the Hyper-V role to the server . For guidance on configuring RemoteApp and Desktop Connection on the server side, refer to steps 1 and 2 in the “Deploying RemoteApp Programs to the Start Menu by Using RemoteApp and Desktop Connection Step-by-Step Guide” found at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd772639.aspx . You will also need to import the SSL certificate for the Remote Desktop Web Access server to your client computers before the users of these computers can use RemoteApp and Desktop Connection . For information on how to import certificates, see step 3 of the above guide . After you have configured your servers and have installed certificates on your clients, you can configure RemoteApp and Desktop Connection on the client side by following these steps: 1. Open RemoteApp and Desktop Connection from Control Panel . 2. Click Set Up A New Connection With RemoteApp And Desktop Connections to launch the New Connection wizard . 3. Type the URL to the Remote Desktop Web Access server in the Connection URL box: 4. Click Next to add connection resources for the RemoteApp And Desktop Connection (be sure to enter your credentials if prompted to do so) . When the connection resources have been added, the details of the RemoteApp And Desktop Connection will be dis- played . 1366 CHapTER 27 Connecting Remote Users and Networks Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  15. 5. Click Finish to complete the wizard . 6. To view all RemoteApp And Desktop Connections that have been added to the client, open RemoteApp And Desktop Connections again from Control Panel . 7. You can now access your RemoteApp programs from the RemoteApp and Desktop Connections folder of your Start menu . Using Remote Desktop CHapTER 27 1367 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  16. 8. You can even access them by searching for them using Start menu search . 9. When you start a RemoteApp program, a balloon notification above the system tray icon indicates that a RemoteApp program is being used . 1368 CHapTER 27 Connecting Remote Users and Networks Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  17. Administrators can create a RemoteApp and Desktop Connection client configuration file ( .wcx) and distribute it to users so they can automatically configure the RemoteApp and Desk- top Connection . Administrators can also use scripts to run the client configuration file silently on the client so that the RemoteApp and Desktop Connection is set up automatically when the user logs on to her Windows 7 computer . To create a .wcx configuration file, follow these steps: 1. Open Remote Desktop Connection Manager on your Remote Desktop Connection Broker server . 2. Right-click on the root node in the console tree and select Create Configuration File . 3. In the Create Configuration File dialog box, type the URL to the Remote Desktop Web Access server in the RAD Connection Feed URL box . 4. Click Save, then distribute the configuration file to users as e-mail attachments, by placing them on a network share, or by using scripts . Using Remote Desktop CHapTER 27 1369 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  18. For more information on RemoteApp and Desktop Connection, see the Remote Desktop Services section of Microsoft TechNet at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library /cc770412.aspx . Summary Windows 7 includes new remote connectivity technologies, such as VPN Reconnect, DirectAccess, and BranchCache . These technologies and others, such as Remote Desktop, have been enhanced in Windows 7 to make them more reliable, more secure, and easier to use and manage . Additional Resources These resources contain additional information and tools related to this chapter . Related Information n General information concerning virtual private networks on Microsoft platforms can be found at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/network/bb545442.aspx . n General information concerning DirectAccess can be found at http://www.microsoft.com /directaccess/ . n General information concerning BranchCache can be found at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/network/dd425028.aspx . n General information concerning Remote Desktop Services in Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows 7 can be found at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library /cc770412.aspx . n The white paper, “Networking Enhancements for Enterprises,” at http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=38fd1d96-3c6e-43ca- b083-3334ddd1ef86&DisplayLang=en. n The Routing and Remote Access Blog can be found at http://blogs.technet.com /rrasblog/ . n The Remote Desktop Services Team Blog can be found at http://blogs.msdn.com/ts/ . n The white paper, “Step-by-Step Guide: Deploying SSTP Remote Access” can be found at http://download.microsoft.com/download/b/1/0/b106fc39-936c-4857-a6ea- 3fb9d1f37063/Deploying%20SSTP%20Remote%20Access%20Step%20by%20Step%20 Guide.doc . On the Companion Media n Get-Modem .ps1 1370 CHapTER 27 Connecting Remote Users and Networks Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  19. CHAPTER 28 Deploying Ipv6 n Understanding IPv6 1371 n IPv6 Enhancements in Windows 7 1388 n Configuring and Troubleshooting IPv6 in Windows 7 1392 n Planning for IPv6 Migration 1406 n Summary 1414 n Additional Resources 1414 L ike the Windows Vista operating system before it, the Windows 7 operating system has a new Next Generation Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) stack with enhanced support for Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) . This chapter provides you with an understanding of why IPv6 is necessary and how it works . The chapter de- scribes the IPv6 capabilities in Windows 7, Windows Vista, and Windows Server 2008 and outlines how to migrate the IPv4 network infrastructure of your enterprise to IPv6 using IPv6 transition technologies, such as Intra-Site Automatic Tunnel Addressing Protocol (ISATAP) . Finally, the chapter describes how to configure and manage IPv6 settings in Windows 7 and how to troubleshoot IPv6 networking problems . Understanding IPv6 The need for migrating enterprise networks from IPv4 to IPv6 is driven by a number of different technological, business, and social factors . The most important of these are: n The exponential growth of the Internet is rapidly exhausting the existing IPv4 public address space . A temporary solution to this problem has been found in Network Address Translation (NAT), a technology that maps multiple private (intranet) addresses to a (usually) single, public (Internet) address . Unfortunately, using NAT-enabled routers can introduce additional problems, such as breaking end-to-end connectivity and security for some network applications . In addition, the rapid proliferation of mobile IP devices is accelerating the depletion of the IPv4 public address space . 1371 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
  20. n The growing use of real-time communications (RTC) on the Internet, such as Voice over IP (VoIP) telephony, instant messaging (IM), and audio/video conferencing, exposes the limited support for Quality of Service (QoS) currently provided in IPv4 . These new RTC technologies need improved QoS on IP networks to ensure reliable end-to-end communications . The design of IPv4 limits possible improvements . n The growing threats faced by hosts on IPv4 networks connected to the Internet can be mitigated considerably by deploying Internet Protocol security (IPsec), both on private intranets and on tunneled connections across the public Internet . However, IPsec was designed as an afterthought to IPv4 and is complex and difficult to implement in many scenarios . IPv6, developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) to solve these problems, includes the following improvements and additions: n IPv6 increases the theoretical address space of the Internet from 4 .3 × 109 addresses (based on 32-bit IPv4 addresses) to 3 .4 × 1038 possible addresses (based on 128-bit IPv6 addresses), which most experts agree should be more than sufficient for the foreseeable future . n The IPv6 address space is designed to be hierarchical rather than flat in structure, which means that routing tables for IPv6 routers can be smaller and more efficient than for IPv4 routers . n IPv6 has enhanced support for QoS that includes a Traffic Class field in the header to specify how traffic should be handled and a new Flow Label field in the header that enables routers to identify packets that belong to a traffic flow and handle them appropriately . n IPv6 now requires IPsec support for standards-based, end-to-end security across the Internet . The new QoS enhancements work even when IPv6 traffic is encrypted using IPsec . Understanding how IPv6 works is essential if you plan to benefit from IPv6 by deploying it in your enterprise . The following sections provide an overview of key IPv6 concepts, features, and terminology . note For more detailed information on Ip concepts, features, and terminology, see the white paper titled “Introduction to Ip Version 6” at http://www.microsoft.com/downloads /details.aspx?FamilyID=CbC0b8A3-b6A4-4952-bbE6-D976624C257C&displaylang=en. another good reference for learning Ipv6 is the book, Understanding IPv6, 2nd Edition, by Joseph Davies (Microsoft press, 2008). Understanding Ipv6 Terminology The following terminology is used to define IPv6 concepts and describe IPv6 features: 1372 CHapTER 28 Deploying IPv6 Please purchase PDF Split-Merge on www.verypdf.com to remove this watermark.
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