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Microsoft offers great breadth and depth of learning content for information workers. Our Microsoft Learning division produces e-learning, books, and training courses that are delivered by our partners. Our extensive Windows Help system consists of several thousand topics. Feedback from our customers has taught us that for Windows Vista, we needed to provide more short content, more content for raising awareness before deployment, and pointers to the most critical topics.

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  1. Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace Last Updated: September/2006 Applies to: IT, training, and communication professionals who are responsible for making sure that employees are trained for and productive on Windows Vista. Abstract: This white paper provides recommendations for helping employees at large organizations learn how to use Microsoft Windows Vista™. It includes an overview of the new learning resources that are available to those who are responsible for training employees; a list of learning objectives; and recommendations, based on our research and on the best practices that we have gathered, for delivering this training at large organizations. This information applies to the Microsoft Windows Vista operating system.
  2. Disclaimer The information that is contained in this document represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation on the  issues discussed as of the date of publication. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it  should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the  accuracy of any information presented after the date of publication. This document is for informational purposes only. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR  IMPLIED, AS TO THE INFORMATION CONTAINED IN THIS DOCUMENT. Compliance with all applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. Without limiting the rights under  copyright, no part of this document may be reproduced, stored in or introduced into a retrieval system, or  transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise), or for  any purpose, without the express written permission of Microsoft Corporation. Microsoft may have patents, patent applications, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property rights  covering the subject matter in this document. Except as expressly provided in any written license agreement  from Microsoft, the furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents, trademarks,  copyrights, or other intellectual property. Unless otherwise noted, the example companies, organizations, products, domain names, e­mail addresses,  logos, people, places and events depicted herein are fictitious, and no association with any real company,  organization, product, domain name, e­mail address, logo, person, place or event is intended or should be  inferred. © 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Win32, Windows, and Windows NT are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft  Corporation in the United States or other countries or regions. The names of actual companies and products that are mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their  respective owners.
  3. Contents Contents............................................................................................................................... 3 About This White Paper ............................................................................................................ 5 Who Should Read This White Paper..................................................................................... 5 What’s In This White Paper................................................................................................... 5 Background........................................................................................................................... 6 New Learning Resources for Windows Vista.............................................................................. 7 A Completely Redesigned Help System................................................................................ 7 Guided Help.......................................................................................................................... 8 Windows Online Help (WOH)................................................................................................ 9 The Enterprise Learning Framework (ELF) Tool................................................................. 10 Tips and Tricks for Windows Vista...................................................................................... 11 "Best Practices" reference guides....................................................................................... 12 What to Teach: Windows Vista Learning Objectives................................................................ 14 Learning Objectives for Windows Vista............................................................................... 16 Collaborating and Communicating..........................................................................................16 Connecting to Work from Home or Away................................................................................16 Desktop and Start Menu......................................................................................................... 16 Ease of Access (Accessibility)................................................................................................ 16 Finding and Organizing Files.................................................................................................. 17 Getting Help........................................................................................................................... 17 Internet Explorer..................................................................................................................... 18 Managing Battery Power........................................................................................................ 18 Mobile PC Tips....................................................................................................................... 18 PC Maintenance and Performance.........................................................................................18 Presentations......................................................................................................................... 19 Printing................................................................................................................................... 19 Security and Privacy...............................................................................................................19 Synchronizing.........................................................................................................................19 Tablet PC............................................................................................................................... 19 Turning Off and Starting Up the Computer............................................................................. 20 Windows SideShow ...............................................................................................................20 Wireless Networking...............................................................................................................20 Working Offline.......................................................................................................................20 Top 7 Behavior Changes (If You Don’t Do Anything Else)................................................... 21 When Changing Skill-Based Behavior Is the Issue................................................................. 22 When Learned Failure Is the Issue......................................................................................... 23 When Inertia Is the Issue........................................................................................................ 24 Top 11 Motivators............................................................................................................... 24 Top 8 Discoverability Targets.............................................................................................. 25 Putting It All Together: Some Areas of Focus for Training................................................... 25 Recommendations for Windows Vista Learning Delivery......................................................... 28 Manage the Learning Curve................................................................................................ 28 Manage Multiple Categories of Information Workers........................................................... 29 What About Beginners?.......................................................................................................... 29 Motivate Information Workers Effectively............................................................................ 30 Do Not Neglect Conceptual Topics..................................................................................... 31 Support Informal Learning................................................................................................... 33 Provide Self-Help Resources in Small Chunks....................................................................... 34 Provide a Variety of Learning Choices and Delivery Mechanisms.......................................... 35 Encourage Viral Learning ................................................................................................... 38 The Role of Learning Influentials............................................................................................ 38 Make Dissemination Easy...................................................................................................... 39 What About IT Support?...................................................................................................... 40 Involve the Right Departments............................................................................................ 41 To "Classic" Or Not To "Classic"?....................................................................................... 41 What About the 2007 Microsoft Office Release?...................................................................... 42 Summary................................................................................................................................. 43 Appendix A: Content Provided by Microsoft to Meet Learning Objectives................................ 44 Collaborating and Communicating..........................................................................................44
  4. Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace 4 Connecting to Work From Home or Away.............................................................................. 46 Desktop and Start Menu......................................................................................................... 47 Ease of Access (Accessibility)................................................................................................ 49 Finding and Organizing Files.................................................................................................. 51 Getting Help........................................................................................................................... 53 Internet Explorer..................................................................................................................... 54 Managing Battery Power........................................................................................................ 56 Mobile PC Tips....................................................................................................................... 57 PC Maintenance and Performance.........................................................................................58 Presentations......................................................................................................................... 59 Printing................................................................................................................................... 60 Security and Privacy...............................................................................................................61 Synchronizing.........................................................................................................................63 Tablet PC............................................................................................................................... 64 Turning Off and Starting Up the Computer............................................................................. 65 Windows SideShow ...............................................................................................................67 Wireless Networking...............................................................................................................68 Working Offline.......................................................................................................................69 © 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
  5. About This White Paper This white paper gives you recommendations for helping information workers learn how to use Windows Vista. At Microsoft, we use the term information workers to describe users in organizations who need to access information while on the job. The emphasis of this white paper is on maximizing the productivity of information workers at large organizations. However, organizations of any size may find useful information here. Who Should Read This White Paper This white paper is pertinent for anyone in your organization who has a stake in making sure that information workers are trained for and are productive on Windows Vista. We expect the material here to be most useful for your training department, communications department and/or the desktop deployment leads that are responsible for the success of information workers who are learning to use Windows Vista. If you're not a training professional, or are not heavily involved in training information workers for Windows Vista, you may not want to read this entire document. If you just want some quick pointers regarding Windows Vista, concentrate on the following sections: • New Learning Resources for Windows Vista • Top 7 Behavior Changes (If You Don’t Do Anything Else) • Top 11 Motivators • Top 8 Discoverability Targets • Putting It All Together: Some Areas of Focus for Training What’s In This White Paper In this white paper, we’ve divided our practical advice for teaching information workers about Windows Vista into three main sections: 1. New learning resources for Windows Vista In this section, we summarize the new learning resources that are available to you to help information workers learn how to use Windows Vista. 2. What to teach: Windows Vista learning objectives In this section, you’ll find a detailed list of learning objectives, including the areas where you should focus your training. 3. Recommendations for Windows Vista Learning Delivery In this section, we make suggestions, based on our research and on what our customers have told us, about how best to deliver Windows Vista learning content to your information workers. Appendix A brings together the first two sections of this white paper by summarizing where to find content for each learning objective. For example, if you’re particularly concerned about people knowing how to use the new Start menu, look in Appendix A to see which learning resources provide topics about it.
  6. Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace 6 Deep Dive The Deep Dive sections of this white paper give more detailed background about a theme. For example, they may provide you with additional information about what is happening in the learning industry in general, or about some background data from Microsoft’s research. Feel free to skip these sections if you only want more general advice. Background Starting with the earliest paper prototypes of Windows Vista, the Windows Client User Experience research team has gathered data on user performance and on user satisfaction with Windows Vista features. Windows Client User Experience researchers have worked closely with the Windows Vista program management, design, and user assistance (UA) teams to incorporate the results of their research into the product. In many cases, this research has led to significant changes that have improved the usability and the learnability of Windows Vista. The Windows Client User Experience team's user research on Windows Vista has included usability lab testing, in-home testing, testing at organizations, and feedback from large customer panels. For this release, we’ve conducted interviews with training stakeholders at large organizations, in order to understand their training practices and how we can assist them with helping information workers learn Windows Vista. In addition, our ongoing ethnography program provides data about how real employees at dozens of organizations actually work with our software. With data from our usability labs, we track information workers' success with common and important operating system tasks, based on time, task-specific success rates, and satisfaction metrics. We specifically include information workers from both large and small organizations in this research. Our goal is always to help the majority of information workers to be able to do these tasks the first time that they use Windows Vista, even before they receive training. In fact, the goal of first-time success in completing tasks has been a strong factor in the design of many of the features of Windows Vista. However, learning must still take place. Learning is critical because the organizational goal is really productivity. Increasing productivity may require learning the benefits of new features that may not be immediately obvious. However, productivity in information workers is difficult to measure. Measurements like those recorded in our usability labs give an incomplete picture of productivity. What if it takes a bit longer to use a new feature, but the work product that is created is more effective in helping an employee be successful? You’ll see in this white paper that we are focusing our learning efforts on giving information workers ideas about what they might be able to do with Windows Vista, and helping them evaluate the features of Windows Vista that are most likely improve their productivity. We do not assume that every information worker needs to learn every new feature. © 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
  7. Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace 7 New Learning Resources for Windows Vista Microsoft offers great breadth and depth of learning content for information workers. Our Microsoft Learning division produces e-learning, books, and training courses that are delivered by our partners. Our extensive Windows Help system consists of several thousand topics. Feedback from our customers has taught us that for Windows Vista, we needed to provide more short content, more content for raising awareness before deployment, and pointers to the most critical topics. The new learning tools for Windows Vista are listed below, and each is described in the following sections. • A completely redesigned Help system • Guided Help • Windows Online Help (WOH) • The Enterprise Learning Framework (ELF) tool • Tips and tricks for Windows Vista • Best Practices reference guides All of these resources are provided to customers at no additional cost. A Completely Redesigned Help System For Windows Vista, all Microsoft Windows XP® Help topics were thrown out, and the new Help system was augmented with graphics and re-written in a non-technical, approachable tone. The topics in the new Help system focus on areas where statistics have shown that we get the most customer queries, as well as important learning areas for new features. The search system for the new Help system has also been greatly improved. These improvements in the new Help system make the content suitable for use in training. Figure 1 shows the Search topic in Windows XP compared to the Search topic Windows Vista. Availability: Now in Windows Vista, from Start menu > Help and Support. Figure 1: Help topic in Windows XP vs. Windows Vista © 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
  8. Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace 8 Guided Help Guided Help (formerly called Active Content Wizard, or ACW) is a new interactive Help format that both describes how to accomplish a task and completes it for the user. Guided Help can either perform the task automatically, or can show a person how to do it step by step. Guided Help is most useful when it is accessed from the Help system that is local to the employee’s computer. The same topics exist on Windows Online Help (WOH), but they are not interactive, because the employee’s computer cannot be controlled from the Web. Some of the topics in Guided Help assist in early learning, such as the What’s new in the Documents folder tour and the Tour the Control Panel tour. A list of Guided Help topics is available on WOH, but to run the topics interactively, you must find them in the Help system that is local to the computer (and that is usually accessed via the Start menu). Availability: Now in Windows Vista, from Start menu > Help and Support > search for “guided help.” Figure 2: Guided Help can walk the information worker through a task, or take the information worker on a brief tour of a task or of a new feature © 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
  9. Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace 9 Windows Online Help (WOH) New for Windows Vista, WOH includes all of the Help topics that arrive in the Windows Vista package, as well as some additional articles, and also provides access to community resources. WOH provides the most up-to-date Windows content available, including new topics that the Windows writing team has produced in response to customer needs. WOH is an important learning resource because unlike with the Help topics that arrive in the Windows Vista package, you can link to any topic at WOH via its URL, and you can share that or any other topic by using the Email this page button that is on every WOH topic. Information workers can also mark an interesting topic for later review by using the Favorites button. You may copy WOH topics and customize them for internal use (for example, on your organization's intranet), as long as you follow the guidelines on the Terms of Use specific to this site webpage at the WOH site. Availability: A Beta 2 version of WOH is now available at http://windowshelp.microsoft.com. Figure 3: Windows Online Help home page © 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
  10. Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace 10 The Enterprise Learning Framework (ELF) Tool The new Web-based Enterprise Learning Framework (ELF) tool helps corporate IT departments and corporate training departments develop a training and communication plan for employees, and provides the training content in short topics that are only a few minutes in length. The Windows content comes primarily from WOH. The ELF tool sifts through several thousand WOH topics, identifies about 150 topics that would be of interest to enterprise information workers, and places them on a timeline. Along with these topics, the ELF tool also points to content for the 2007 Microsoft Office release, which resides at the Office Online website. A future release of the ELF tool will include the ability to install it on your local intranet, make modifications to it, and schedule automatic employee e-mails. Availability: The ELF tool is part of the Microsoft Solution Accelerator for Business Desktop Deployment (BDD), which is available on the TechNet Desktop Deployment Center. The ELF tool can be accessed by anyone without a password. The ELF tool is available at www.microsoft.com/technet/desktopdeployment/bdd/elf/welcome.aspx. Figure 4: Excerpt from an ELF report. The purple text in the report links to WOH topics © 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
  11. Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace 11 Tips and Tricks for Windows Vista Tips and Tricks for Windows Vista is a scripted demo session that lasts approximately 45-60 minutes. It demonstrates the most important new features of Windows Vista, and is ideal for a lunch-and-learn format. The material, which is available to you, includes: • A demo script. • Introductory slides. • A video of the presentation1. • A tip sheet (Word document). • A Top 10 Tips and Tricks reference card (PDF). You can make the video available to employees. In addition, you or a Microsoft field representative can deliver the presentation live. The Top 10 reference card can be distributed to employees independently of the demo session. Availability: To obtain the Tips and Tricks for Windows Vista materials, visit www.windowsvistatnt.com. Figure 5: Excerpt from Top 10 Tips and Tricks reference card 1 Video is in production as of the publication date of this white paper. © 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
  12. Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace 12 "Best Practices" reference guides Microsoft Information Technology (IT) created the Everyday Productivity Education (EPE) program to help its information workers make the best use of Microsoft products and IT services. The EPE program's job aids and instructional content are presented in simple, easy to use formats. The EPE group is sharing several of its "Best Practices" for Windows Vista guides with customers. These guides were created in Microsoft PowerPoint®; feel free to modify them to meet the needs of your organization. The two guides that the EPE group has shared are listed in the following table. For more information about the EPE program, visit http://www.microsoft.com/technet/itsolutions/msit/epe.mspx. Table 1. "Best Practices" Reference Guides Title of "Best Practices" guide Description of guide Best Practices for Everyday Work Helps you to understand the enhanced with Windows Vista search capabilities, file organization, and user interface (UI) improvements in Windows Vista, so that you can work smarter. Best Practices for Power Management In Windows Vista, a power plan helps you with Windows Vista manage your computer's power consumption. Use power plans to reduce your computer’s power consumption. You can also use the new Sleep functionality in Windows Vista to reduce your computer's power consumption. Availability: To obtain these "Best Practices" guides, contact your Microsoft field representative. © 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
  13. Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace 13 Figure 6: Sample page from the Best Practices for Everyday Work with Windows Vista reference guide © 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
  14. Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace 14 What to Teach: Windows Vista Learning Objectives In building the learning objectives for Windows Vista, we assumed that most corporate employees need to learn what’s new and different about Windows, and do not need to learn the operating system from scratch. However, in addition to topics about changes to Windows, the ELF tool also includes topics that cover other features of Windows Vista that aren’t necessarily new. For example, there are some important security-related concepts in the ELF tool, such as recognizing a secure wireless network, that aren’t included in this white paper because they are not new to Windows Vista. If you are interested in more general Windows Vista topics in addition to the learning objectives in this white paper, or if you are transitioning employees from a version of Windows that's older than Windows XP, you should review the topics in the ELF tool. Deep Dive The 5 Stages of Learning: Meeting Learners Where They Live by Bob Mosher, Director of Learning Evangelism, MSLearning division, Microsoft Corporation Have you ever heard the expression “The only constant is change”? Nothing could be truer when it comes to effectively training learners. With all the new learning modalities that are available, it's all an organization can do just to keep up with the latest industry trends. But with all of our attention focused on training modalities, have we been equally as effective in keeping up with our learners' training needs? If you look at how most organizations deliver training to the majority of their student populations, many still take an entry-level approach, meaning they design learning around the early stages of knowledge adoption. There's a reason they do it this way. There was a time when the entry-level learner dominated the organizational landscape. Training departments and learning organizations developed thousands of hours of classroom training to educate this learner, and they did a wonderful job. But the number of entry-level learners in the organizational context is growing smaller every day. Most learners in this context have matured beyond the entry level, and they need to be challenged at a higher level. For the sake of this article, I will group learners into two buckets: entry-level learners and experienced learners. Entry-level learners are at or near the beginning of their learning journey. The content is either completely new to them, or they are just starting to work with it; either way, this group is focused on the acquisition of skills. Experienced learners, by contrast, have moved beyond skills acquisition, and are more worried about the application and integration of the skills they have. Learners in this group are more interested in what has changed based on what they have already learned, and they do not need to be taught as though they had little to no background. While maturing through these two levels, most learners can be seen at one of five different stages. Entry-level learners are typically either at the initial stage or at a continued stage of learning. At the initial stage, entry-level learners are completely new to the content. They are heavily dependent learners who typically need a lot of guidance. Continued learners in the entry-level stage, by contrast, are simply learning more content. The content is still very new, but it tends to be more advanced. Both of these stages have typically been addressed in the classroom with a subject matter expert at the front of the room. Both stages are easy to assess, because the skills are measured by whether they can be recalled or demonstrated, not always whether they can be applied. © 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
  15. Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace 15 Experienced learners typically fall into one of three stages. The first stage is the remediation stage. Experienced learners in this stage do not need more content. It’s not that they didn’t “get it” the first time; rather, they are struggling back at the workplace trying to apply their new skills to their jobs. Simply putting them back in a classroom to hear the same skills will not address this problem. Experienced learners in the remediation stage need more reference-based and example-based approaches, which will allow them to apply their new skills. The second stage of experienced learner is the upgrade stage, which occurs when "the rules change"—much like what will happen with the introduction of Windows Vista—on students who are already applying what they have learned. Experienced learners in the upgrade stage simply need an environment where they can see and try the "new rules". The final stage that experienced learners fall into is the transfer stage. In this challenging stage, not only have the rules changed, but so has the domain. Nothing is new conceptually, but the steps and the environment are no longer familiar. Experienced learners in the transfer stage are often wrongfully sent back to the entry level; however, doing this ignores the conceptual background that these learners already possess. Experienced learners at this stage need a robust experiential environment where the concepts that they've learned can be recognized and then related to the new domain to which they are being introduced. If we are to meet the learning needs of experienced learners, we must take a closer look at the learning tools, strategies, and processes that we put before them. Entry-level learners will always be with us, but they are being overtaken by the experienced learners who, in many organizations, may already be the dominant learning population. How will your organization approach, recognize, and address this shift? If you scan the lists of learning objectives below, you’ll see that we are not recommending that people learn to use and apply every new feature of Windows Vista. Instead, we have categorized the learning objectives into three areas: 1. Knowledge and Comprehension: These topics include information that people should be able to recall for future application. Examples are terminology changes or improvements to a feature. The titles of these learning objectives start with Recognize, Identify, Summarize, or Describe. 2. Evaluation: These topics are about features that the information worker should learn enough about to be able to determine their value in the information worker’s own work. The titles of these objectives start with Assess or Evaluate. 3. Application: These topics are about features that the information worker should learn to apply directly to his or her work. The titles of these topics start with Use or Apply. There are over 100 learning objectives here! But that doesn't mean that you need to teach employees 100 different things about Windows Vista. This is a comprehensive list from which you should select the most relevant topics for your organization and your employees. As you try to determine which topics from this list you should use, keep the following points in mind: • Not every learning objective will apply to your organization. Use the list as a starting point. We expect most organizations to use from 30% to 50% of these learning objectives. • Not every learning objective will apply to every information worker in your organization. The ELF tool filters topics according to employee profiles, such as road warriors or meeting warriors. • The primary learning objectives cover the areas that we believe have the most potential impact on productivity. The secondary learning objectives are not unimportant, but may have a less dramatic effect on productivity. © 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
  16. Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace 16 Appendix A shows how the learning objectives relate to Help topics, which can be accessed online from WOH and are also referenced on the ELF tool. Learning Objectives for Windows Vista Collaborating and Communicating Primary Learning Objectives 1. Evaluate the new Windows Meeting Space tool for collaboration capabilities. 2. Recognize that NetMeeting is no longer available and identify alternatives. 3. Recognize that Windows Messenger is no longer available and identify alternatives. Secondary Learning Objectives 4. Evaluate new ad-hoc networks for sharing files and presentations. Connecting to Work from Home or Away Primary Learning Objectives 1. Use the new VPN Wizard to connect to the workplace. Desktop and Start Menu Primary Learning Objectives 1. Recognize the new button for launching the Start menu. 2. Assess the new Sidebar. 3. Use the new Start menu search box. 4. Use the new All Programs list format. 5. Recognize the different ways to launch the Run command. 6. Recognize changes to the Windows Flip feature (ALT+TAB). 7. Assess the new Windows Flip 3D feature (the Windows logo key+TAB). 8. Evaluate the improved ability to detect and to adjust for multiple displays. Secondary Learning Objectives 9. Assess the new taskbar thumbnail previews. 10. Recognize updated recommendations for getting the best display quality. 11. Evaluate the new feature for comparing windows side by side. Ease of Access (Accessibility) Primary Learning Objectives 1. Recognize the change in terminology from Accessibility to Ease of Access. 2. Recognize that Utility Manager has been replaced by the Ease of Access Center. 3. Recognize that the Accessibility Wizard has been replaced by a questionnaire in the Ease of Access Center. 4. Assess the new webpage Zoom feature. 5. Assess the new screen Magnifier feature. 6. Use the new Ease of Access Center. © 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
  17. Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace 17 Secondary Learning Objectives 7. Summarize improvements to the Narrator tool. 8. Evaluate new Speech Recognition capabilities. 9. Summarize new keyboard settings. 10. Assess the new Ease of Access button on the logon screen. 11. For people without disabilities, evaluate the new ease of access features. Note Why the name change from Accessibility to Ease of Access? As the workforce ages and becomes more diverse, it’s important that employees who do not have disabilities recognize how accessibility features can help make their computers easier to use. This name change highlights these accessibility features. Consider including some of the Ease of Access features in your training for all employees. Finding and Organizing Files Primary Learning Objectives 1. Recognize that My Documents is now just Documents. 2. Evaluate turning menus back on. 3. Evaluate the new Search folder. 4. Use the new Search box. 5. Use the new Address bar. 6. Use and customize the new Navigation pane, including the Folders option. 7. Evaluate major improvements to the use of tags and properties for finding and organizing files. 8. Evaluate the new column heading filter. 9. Evaluate the new column heading stack and group options. 10. Evaluate new ways to save a search. 11. Use the new Views option to change icon size. 12. Evaluate the new ability to retrieve previous versions of files. 13. Evaluate the new reading pane. Secondary Learning Objectives 14. Evaluate the new Search pane 15. Summarize how the new index improves searches. 16. Evaluate the new Backup Wizard and the new Restore Wizard. 17. Review new methods for customizing folders and selecting files. Getting Help Primary Learning Objectives 1. Use the new Help system. 2. Evaluate the new WOH site. 3. Recognize the new ability to share online Help topics with others. Secondary Learning Objectives 4. Recognize the new Guided Help topics. 5. Recognize that the Help system can access the new WOH website. © 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
  18. Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace 18 Internet Explorer Primary Learning Objectives 1. Evaluate the method for turning Internet Explorer menus back on. 2. Use the new Toolbar Search box in Internet Explorer. 3. Recognize the new Favorites icons. 4. Summarize the new Favorites Center features. 5. Evaluate the new tabbed browsing. 6. Evaluate the new Quick Tabs. 7. Evaluate the new capabilities for saving and restoring groups of tabs. 8. Assess the new webpage Zoom feature. 9. Evaluate the new method for changing the home page. 10. Recognize that now multiple home pages may be used. 11. Use different methods to navigate to visited webpages. Secondary Learning Objectives 12. Recognize new capability for multiple providers in Search. 13. Describe the new RSS feeds. 14. Summarize the new Pop-up Blocker feature. 15. Describe new scaled webpage printing. Managing Battery Power Primary Learning Objectives 1. Recognize the new battery meter. 2. Recognize that power schemes are now called power plans. 3. Assess the new default power plans. Secondary Learning Objectives 4. Recognize that the new power plans can be customized. Mobile PC Tips Primary Learning Objectives 1. Evaluate the new Windows Mobility Center. PC Maintenance and Performance Primary Learning Objectives 1. Recognize that disk fragmentation now runs automatically. 2. Evaluate new ways to get information about computer speed and performance. 3. Use the new control panel Search box and the improved category navigation. Secondary Learning Objectives 4. Recognize the new way to stop a program from running when you start the computer. 5. Evaluate the new Backup and Restore Center © 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
  19. Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace 19 Presentations Primary Learning Objectives 1. Evaluate the new presentation settings. 2. Recognize the improvements in automatically adjusting for a projector display. Secondary Learning Objectives 3. Describe the new network projector feature. Printing Primary Learning Objectives 1. Describe the new XML Paper Specification (XPS) document format. Security and Privacy Primary Learning Objectives 1. Recognize that some system settings are locked as indicated by the shield icon. 2. Understand why Windows Vista prompts for you for verification of administrative tasks. 3. Evaluate the new certificate information that is associated with the lock icon in Internet Explorer. 4. Summarize the capabilities of the new phishing filter and how to use it to protect yourself. Secondary Learning Objectives 5. Identify new security features and new privacy features in Internet Explorer. 6. Evaluate the new BitLocker encryption. 7. Recognize the new Windows Defender tool for protecting the computer against spyware. Synchronizing Primary Learning Objectives 1. Use the new Sync Center. 2. Use the new system tray icons on the Sync Center. 3. Assess new strategies for syncing success that use Sync Center. Tablet PC Primary Learning Objectives 1. Identify new features for the Tablet PC. 2. Use the input panel efficiently by utilizing new features. Secondary Learning Objectives 3. Evaluate new handwriting recognition strategies. 4. Evaluate new ways to use the pen. © 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
  20. Learning Windows Vista in the Workplace 20 Turning Off and Starting Up the Computer Primary Learning Objectives 1. Identify the new location of the Shut Down option. 2. Recognize that the Shut Down option is now used only when the computer must be turned off. 3. Recognize that the Standby mode and the Hibernate mode have been replaced by the Sleep mode. 4. Use the new power button, instead of the Shut Down command, to put the computer in Sleep mode. Secondary Learning Objectives 5. Recognize why the new power button occasionally changes to the Shut Down command. 6. Evaluate the new ability to switch users without logging off. Windows SideShow Primary Learning Objectives 1. Summarize the capabilities of the new Windows SideShow-compatible devices. 2. Use security features of the new Windows SideShow-compatible devices. Secondary Learning Objectives 3. Recognize the common features of the Windows SideShow-compatible device. Wireless Networking Primary Learning Objectives 1. Use the modified Connect To feature. Working Offline Primary Learning Objectives 1. Use improved offline files. © 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

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