Xem 1-20 trên 21 kết quả Aesthetic impact
  • That cognition is situated implies that it is context-dependent. The claim that cognition is context-dependent is not controversial per se. Context can influence thought processes in a number of ways, accidentally or systemati- cally, without in any way being essential to or constitutive of these processes. However, TSC champions a strong notion of context-dependence, to the effect that individual cognitive processes and states of the mind involve entities in the agent’s surroundings essentially and actively (Clancey 1991).

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  • Contemporary perspectives in psychology and education characterize ideal students as rational and in control of their thinking and actions. The good student is often described as intentional, cognitive, metacognitive, critical, and reflective. I begin with a brief history of control and ratio- nality to establish how “The Tradition” is deeply rooted in philosophy, religion, and, in gen- eral, the story of Western civilization.

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  • Church architecture is a contentious field of inquiry. Polemics, dog- matism, and caricature abound. It would be unrealistic to think any book could resolve the controversies, but a fresh look at the most basic questions about churches, their meanings and their uses, may prove useful to all sides. The incentive to write this book was mixed: it grew out of historical interest, but also out of an urge to see more clearly what churches have meant and what they can mean for com- munities that build and use them.

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  • Dense, erudite and sometimes even esoteric, Bonfand’s book is written for the scholar rather than a more general audience. Nevertheless, one has to acknowledge the risk-taking and even the tour de force aspect of the book in which Bonfand ponders the relation between painting and cinema in a very new way. Finally, this work is very encouraging for further investigations of the phenomenology of film using the groundbreaking concepts of the French new wave in phenomenology.

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  • The initiating problem is unstructured design processes and vague descriptions of the form problems in the students’ critique of each other's product proposals, and very vague presentations of the product's aesthetic qualities in their reports. The problem must be seen in relation to the fact that the majority of the students can express themselves clearly in engineering fields and that design methodology is based on technical parameters.

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  • Question D is answered positively, because there is a clear correlation between the ability to manage the procedure and achieve a clear articulation of forms. By comparison, there were students who tried formgiving by selected design parameter only and some students who were able to determine the main impact only. The answer to which of Baumgarten’s aesthetic considerations were applied involves only the 6 considerations which the students have worked with in connection with the earlier mentioned evaluations.

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  • Areas with high concentrations of air-borne particulate matter are more likely to experience fogs, because these particles are preferred nucleation sites for water droplets. Smoke and soot are also very undesirable aesthetically. Soot is formed during combustion when the supply of oxygen is insufficient for complete conversion of carbon to carbon oxides. Its formation is mainly a problem in the combustion of liquid and solid fuels (oil, coal, or wood), because molecular-scale mixing of fuel and oxygen is not as easy here as it is in the combustion of natural gas (see below).

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  • Gestalt structures of purely formal beauty. Objects of sensation manifest themselves very rarely, if ever, in isolation. They normally occur in association with each other in such a way as to manifest Gestalt structures of different types, and such structures, too, may be beautiful or ugly. Thus melodies, tones, geometrical patterns, blends of perfumes or of tastes, rhythms, colour-harmonies, etc., will constitute Witasek's second class of elementary aesthetic objects (39ff.).

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  • But we not only feel with Gretchen, we also feel sympathy and compassion for the maid, we experience what Witasek calls feelings of involvement [Anteilsgefühle]. The status of such sympathy-feelings is perhaps relatively easy to understand: they are genuine feelings which the subject himself genuinely has when he presents to himself a given object.

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  • One of the most important things we learned about the meaning of primitive art is that it deals with, and answers in a way crucial for every person, the biggest question in the world— how to see the relation of beauty and ugliness. In a lecture on sculpture, Eli Siegel described the impact of primitive art on modern art as “the incursion of the ugly.” This is a work by Mark Di Suvero. “Primitive art,” Mr. Siegel said, “has this great depth; and it ...made the ugly part of art, because since the 1920's....it was felt that sculpture could be distorted, could be grotesque.”...

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  • What is the impact of damage on classic works of art from the past? It is true that we strive to preserve and repair them, but perhaps the accidents of history have the effect of renewing rather than destroying art works. Vandalized works seem strangely modern. In 1977 a vandal attacked a Rembrandt self-portrait with sulfuric acid, transforming the masterpiece forever and regrettably. 8 Nevertheless, the problem is not that the resulting image no longer belongs in the history of art. ...

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  • This examination of some of the compositions produced by Villa-Lobos over the 1910s reveals his desire to take a stance in relation to Rio de Janeiro’s classical musicians. To be accepted by his peers, he had to abide by the aesthetic rules of the classical music scene in the city. This included moving away from popular music: it is striking that, in the body of work composed by Villa-Lobos during the 1910s, there is an almost complete absence of aesthetic elements linked to popular music, despite the composer’s contact with the chorões.

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  • In industrialized countries, distribution systems deliver electricity literally everywhere, taking power generated at many locations and delivering it to end users. Generation, transmission, and distribution — of these big three components of the electricity infrastructure, the distribution system gets the least attention. Yet, it is often the most critical component in terms of its effect on reliability and quality of service, cost of electricity, and aesthetic (mainly visual) impacts on society....

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  • The historic character of the landscape shouldtherefore be considered alongside other aspects ofcharacter and visual and aesthetic issues when framingplanning policies or determining individual applications,and landscape capacity and sensitivity analyses shouldalways include the historic dimension.Where localauthorities have completed an appraisal of this historic dimension of the landscape as part of theEnglish Heritage-sponsored Historic LandscapeCharacterisation programme,this appraisal should be incorporated in the overall assessment of landscape impact.

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  • THOUGHTFUL OBSERVERS of global ecosystems cannot fail to see that we live in a world dominated by humans.We cannot stand apart from nature, and now nature as we know it cannot stand apart from us. Faced with dawning clarity about this new relationship, we are uncertain of what to do.

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  • Volume 4 delves into our interconnected, networked society. The Internet is explored in detail, including its history, applications, and backbone. Molecular computing and artificial life are discussed, as are mobile computing and encryption technology. The reader will find articles on electronic banking, books, commerce, publishing, as well as information access and overload. Ethical matters pertaining to the electronic universe are also addressed. Volume 4 extends our aesthetic interest with articles on photography and the use of computers in art.

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  • For work or recreation, business or pleasure – whatever the reason, all sorts of people spend a great deal of time in hotels and guest houses, restaurants and bars. Whether the experience is a positive one depends on a lot of factors. But visual impact is high on the list. Outside our normal environment our senses are particularly alert, ready to register and store unfamiliar and positive new impressions. This is an automatic human response – one that paves the way for an appreciation of surroundings crafted for aesthetic appeal....

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  • Company culture underpins a person’s acceptability and shared values. Such values have an impact on the work of Human Resource managers involved in the recruitment, selection, and especially the retention of staff. There is a link too to allocating training opportunities to those in favour within an organisation. A key concern must surely be retention of valued staff. Thus an ‘aesthetic’ employee is perceived, perhaps through behaviour, as talented, valued and beautiful, though probably not in a physical sense.

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  • Or consider what our great grandfathers thought about the mountains, which we now consider so scenic. 4 They were 'monstrous excrescences of nature'. 5 God originally made the world a smooth sphere happily habitable for the original humans; but, alas, humans sinned, and the earth was warped in punishment. Thomas Burnet is repelled by these 'ruines of a broken World', 'wild, vast and indigested heaps of Stones and Earth' that resulted when 'con- fusion came into Nature'. 6 John Donne called them 'warts, and pock-holes in the face of th'earth'. 7 Now we know better.

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  • Careers for Nature Lovers and Other Outdoor Types takes an enticing look at the possibilities and training requirements for dozens of jobs. The book provides expert advice on how readers can put their love for Mother Nature to work in the career of their dreams.

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