Animal ecology

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  • As science, ecology is often accused of being weak because of its basic lack of predictive power (Peters 1991) and the many ecological concepts judged vague or tautological (Shrader-Frechette and McCoy 1993). Also, important paradigms that dominated the ecological scene for years have been discarded in favor of new concepts and theories that swamp the most recent ecological literature (e.g., the abandoning of the island biogeography theory in favor of the metapopulations theory; Hanski and Simberloff 1997).

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  • First and foremost, it is a book geared towards fish aquarists. And it is a heavy read with alot of chemistry and biology. To sum up the book: the author wrote the book to bring it to the reader's attention that an aquarium is a sort of (semi)closed ecosystem, and it needs to be thought of as this in order to be successful in raising the plants and animals inside the aquarium. she then describes the biological principles behind her methods of setting up and maintaining "low-tech" planted aquariums (as opposed to hi-tech, like those of takashi amano). She uses...

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  • As science, ecology is often accused of being weak because of its basic lack of predictive power (Peters 1991) and the many ecological concepts judged vague or tautological. Also, important paradigms that dominated the ecological scene for years have been discarded in favor of new concepts

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  • Chapter 3 Animal Home Ranges and Territories and Home Range Estimators Most animals are not nomadic but live in fairly confined areas where they enact their day-to-day activities. Such areas are called home ranges. Burt provided the verbal definition of a mammal’s home range that is the foundation of the general concept used today.

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  • The last three rows demonstrated the crucial counterintuitive prediction that small prey would be excluded from the diet, independently of their encounter rate, if the encounter rate with large prey were above a certain quantifiable threshold. Those were heady days! Setting aside the fact that the small prey were not totally ignored, it seemed as though a very simple, testable model, derived from a few starting assumptions about rate maximization and constraints on foraging, could actually predicthowan animal responded in an experiment. It’s hard to overstate the excitement at the time....

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  • The timing of the publication of this book couldn’t be better as we celebrate the 50th anniversary of Charles Elton’s seminal book, The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants. Since this influential book was published in 1958, the study of bioinvasions has developed exponentially, alongside the exponential growth in the magnitude of the invasion problem itself. Today, bioinvasion, a highly complex ecological process and environmental concern, has become a specific branch in ecology and environmental studies, with many disciplines developing within it....

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  • Chapter 1 Hypothesis Testing in Ecology Ecologists apply scientific methods to solve ecological problems. This simple sentence contains more complexity than practical ecologists would like to admit. Consider the storm that greeted Robert H. Peters’s (1991) book A Critique for Ecology.

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  • Chapter 2 A Critical Review of the Effects of Marking on the Biology of Vertebrates Vertebrates often are marked to facilitate identification of free-ranging individual animals or groups for studies of behavior, population biology, and physiology. Marked animals provided data for many of the topics discussed in this volume.

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  • Chapter 7 Monitoring Populations Assessing changes in local populations is the key to understanding the temporal dynamics of animal populations, evaluating management effectiveness for harvested or endangered species, documenting compliance with regulatory requirements, and detecting incipient change.

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  • There are 4 million miles of roads in the United States. One hundred years ago, roads were primarily unpaved and had half the number of miles of the present U.S. road system. As the system grew, roads became wider and more complex structurally to provide for more and heavier traffic. New construction technology and greater structural stability were needed to improve the road system. All phases of road development—from construction and use by vehicles to maintenance—affect physical and chemical soil conditions, water flow, and air and water quality.

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  • The “origin of this species” lies in the pages of the journal Biometrika and precedes the birth of either of the authors. There, in his remarkable landmark 1951 paper “Random dispersal in theoretical populations,” J.G. Skellam made a number of observations that have profoundly affected the study of spatial ecology.

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  • Question 1: What is human ecology? Please, draw a diagram showing relationship between Ecosystem and Social system? What are benefits for Economics to study Human Ecology? - Ecology is the science of relationships between living organisms and their environment. - Human ecology is about relationships between people and their environment. In human ecology the environment is perceived as an ecosystem - An ecosystem is everything in a specified area - the air, soil, water, living organisms and physical structures, including everything built by humans.

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  • In the spirit of place, Steve Apfelbaum and his partner, Susan Lehnhardt, have found a unique spiritual connection through their love of the land. To be “rooted in the land” involves actively participating in a known landscape. Steve and Susan have worked directly on the land, connecting both with it and with each other as members of a community of interdependent parts —soils, waters, plants, and animals.

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  • TOWARD A GREATER AWARENESS OF THE PRIVILEGE OF WHAT IT MEANS TO be the human animal is what this book is about. To me, it is a wild and ethical imperative—an urgent reminder that we are inextricably linked to the land; that the history of every living creature is within us; that we are above all a mindful, poetic species and that we are the “keepers of our zoo.” If we cannot accept this then we will continue to be the creatures of our own undoing.

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  • In contrast to other animals, humans sense their world chiefly by vision, sound, and touch. We have, in general, a remarkably undeveloped sense of smell, and so it is not surprising that we fail to appreciate how important chemical signals are in the lives of other organisms. Chemical signals and cues serve insects in numerous ways, including sexual advertisement, social organization, defense, and finding and recognizing resources.

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  • Enzymes that function within plants, animals, and microorganisms are fundamental to life, and their contributions to metabolic pathways and processes have been studied extensively. For over 100 years there has been interest in what today is called ecological or environmental enzymology. This aspect of enzymology originates from the work of Woods, who, in 1899, wrote about the survival and function in soil of plant peroxidases following their release from decaying plant roots.

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  • Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are part of a recent agricultural trend toward large-scale, corporate-owned and managed livestock production. A far cry from the traditional family farm, CAFOs have lowered prices and increased production—but at a cost. While some of the problems CAFOs can cause are economic and related to small farm and farming community culture, or societal with a focus of the animal rights activism groups, other problems are ecological and environmental and will only be solved by intelligently crafted and enforced legislation....

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  • The environmental science of ecology is the study of the relationship of plants andanimals to their physical and biological environment. The physical environment includeslight and heat or solar radiation, moisture, wind, oxygen, carbon dioxide, nutrients in soil,water, and atmosphere. The biological environment includes organisms of the same kindas well as other plants and animals.

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  • Chapter 4 Delusions in Habitat Evaluation: Measuring Use, Selection, and Importance Management of wildlife populations, whether to support a harvest, conserve threatened species, or promote biodiversity, generally entails habitat management. Habitat management presupposes some understanding of species’ needs.

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  • Chapter 5 Investigating Food Habits of Terrestrial Vertebrates Why study food habits? Probably one of the most fundamental questions that ecologists attempt to answer is, “What resources does a particular species require to exist?” Indeed, the first principle among wildlife ecologists is to have a thorough understanding of the food.

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