Anthropogenic climate change

Xem 1-13 trên 13 kết quả Anthropogenic climate change
  • Evidence grows daily of the rapid changes in climate due to human activities and their impact on plants and animals. Plant function is inextricably linked to climate and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. On the shortest and smallest scales the climate affects the plant’s immediate environment and thus directly influences physiological processes. On longer and larger time and space scales climate influ- ences species distribution and community composition and determines what crops can be viably produced in managed agricultural, horticultural and forestry ecosys- tems.

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  • The failure of the UN climate change summit in Copenhagen in December 2009 to effectively reach a global agreement on emission reduction targets, led many within the developing world to view this as a reversal of the Kyoto Protocol and an attempt by the developed nations to shirk out of their responsibility for climate change.

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  • As Durban, South Africa, prepares for the 17th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol in November this year, the world is recovering from a series of climate and environmental-related disasters, which have occurred over the past few years. The Indian Ocean tsunami, Hurricane Katrina, the Haiti earthquake, the New Zealand earthquake, the Japanese tsunami and nuclear crisis, among others, have killed and affected millions.

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  • The cement industry contributes about 5% to global anthropogenic CO2 emissions, making the cement industry an important sector for CO2-emission mitigation strategies. CO2 is emitted from the calcination process of limestone, from combustion of fuels in the kiln, as well as from power generation. In this paper, we review the total CO2 emissions from cement making, including process and energyrelated emissions. Currently, most available data only includes the process emissions. We also discuss CO2 emission mitigation options for the cement industry....

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  • Anthropogenic air pollution constitutes of many substances. Greenhouse gases absorb and reflect some of the infrared parts of solar radiation reflected from the earth surface thus causing the troposphere to be warmer. Among others, these substances are carbone-dioxide, water vapour, hydrogen oxides, nitrogen-oxides and methane. Beyond causing warming, most of these gases are poisonous to the Earth’s biosphere. Besides greenhouse gases, there are a few more poisonous substances which have anthropogenic sources.

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  • Tham khảo sách 'planet earth 2011 – global warming challenges and opportunities for policy and practice_2', khoa học tự nhiên, công nghệ môi trường phục vụ nhu cầu học tập, nghiên cứu và làm việc hiệu quả

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  • In order to secure the energy supply to an increasing population and at the same time limit the damage to Earth, i.e. avoiding a fatal climate change as a result of anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases (primarily CO2), immediate action is necessary. This includes reducing the energy consumption, increasing the energy conversion efficiency, and using renewable energies. The transport sector is the one most dependent on fossil energy and it stands for a significant part of the energy consumption in the world.

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  • Global Warming has become perhaps the most complicated issue being faced by world leaders. Thus, it requires field of attention for many modern societies, power and energy engineers, academicians, researchers and stakeholders. The so-called consensus in the past century anthropogenically induced Global Warming, has recently been disputed by rising number of climate change panelists.

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  • Nowadays, environmental issues including air and water pollution, climate change, overexploitation of marine ecosystems, exhaustion of fossil resources, conservation of biodiversity are receiving major attention from the public, stakeholders and scholars from the local to the planetary scales. It is now clearly recognized that human activities yield major ecological and environ- mental stresses with irreversible loss of species, destruction of habitat or cli- mate catastrophes as the most dramatic examples of their effects.

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  • There has been a steady increase in anthropogenic pressure over the past few years due to rapid industrialization, urbanization and population growth, causing frequent environmental hazards. Threats of global environmental change, such as climate change and sea level rise, will exacerbate such problems. Therefore, appropriate policies and measures are needed for management to address both local and global trends.

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  • Carbon dioxide is produced in several anthropogenic activities at a rate of ca. 35 Gt/y. The main sources are: (1) the combustion of fossil carbon (production of electric energy, transport, heating, industry), (2) the utilization of biomass (combustion to obtain energy, fermentation), and (3) the decomposition of natural carbonates (mainly in the steel and cement industry).

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  • The state of aquatic ecosystems reflects the general state of the biosphere. The situation in the biosphere affected by anthropogenic factors was characterized as “a slow explosion” (Fedorov 1987). The global change in the biosphere and climatic system of the Earth is a manifestation of this “slow explosion” (World Resources 1990–1991, Izrael et al. 1992).

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  • The sustainability and prosperity of the ancient civilizations of China, Egypt, Babylonia, Phoenicia, Persia and Roma were based on the extensive use of water for human consumption, crop irrigation, canal navigation and energy generation. Today, the worldwide scarcity of water and clean energy constitutes a central and critical problem for the whole humankind. This situation is aggravated as industrial, agricultural and municipal effl uents reach the water bodies, or the coastal seawater that is used as feed for desalination plants.

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