Xem 1-8 trên 8 kết quả Asbestos exposure
  • Under moderate conditions the body automatically adjusts itself to keep its temperature within safe limits. Sweating is the body's most efficient means of getting rid of heat, but the more humid the air, the harder it is for sweat to evaporate and the harder it is for the body to cool off. Under hot and humid conditions, work becomes harder because much of our blood is going to the surface of the body, and less is available to the active muscles. Loss of salt from sweating can result in fatigue.

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  • State of the Science and Roadmap for Research (hereafter called the Roadmap), that provides an overview of the state of the science and a plan for future research in areas including toxicology, mineralogy, epidemiology, and exposure assessment. The focus of the proposed research is on clarifying the relationship between human health effects and the physical and chemical characteristics

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  • A resolution agreed at ILO’s 2006 conference clarified the purpose of the asbestos convention. It said “the elimination of the future use of asbestos and the identification and proper management of asbestos currently in place are the most effective means to protect workers from asbestos exposure and to prevent future asbestos-related deaths.” The 2006 resolution added that the convention “should not be used to provide a justification for, or endorsement of, the continued use of asbestos.

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  • Medical Records The worker is assured access to his or her medical records maintained by their employers or by outside contractors. Medical records include: Medical and employment questionnaires or histories (including job description and occupational exposures). Results of medical examinations (pre-employment, pre-assignment, periodic or episodic) and laboratory tests (including X-ray examinations and all biological monitoring). Medical opinions, diagnoses, progress notes and recommendations. Descriptions of treatment and prescriptions. Employee medical complaints.

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  • Tuyển tập báo cáo các nghiên cứu khoa học quốc tế ngành hóa học dành cho các bạn yêu hóa học tham khảo đề tài: Retrospective exposure assessment to airborne asbestos among power industry workers

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  • Exposure to pollutants from the World Trade Center attacks has come primarily in three phases. First, the collapse of the two 110-story towers and adjacent structures generated high-intensity, peak pollution discharges on September 11th . Second, fires from the crash of two fuel-filled airliners into the Trade Center towers and fires and the resulting smoke plume at Ground Zero following the towers’ collapse created significant additional pollution discharges, which continued to some degree for at least three months.

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  • A variety of occupational risks is known to cause cancer. Every year more than seven million people die of cancer. Forty percent of these cases could be prevented which means that one in every ten cancer deaths is preventable through interventions targeted on exposure in the working environment. The articles in this issue of GOHNET highlight some aspects of the problem and the prevention of occupational cancer.

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  • Certain jobs have a notorious reputation for causing cancer. Asbestos and lung cancer and mesothelioma, a cruel and invariably fatal cancer. Vinyl chloride exposure and liver cancer. Work in the rubber industry and bladder cancer. And nasal cancer and work with wood or leather dust. But many other jobs have a risk which is just as real, but which is less commonly known. The man who delivered the milk to an asbestos factory in Canada got cancer as a result. Nurses handling cancer drugs can be at risk.

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