Xem 1-20 trên 90 kết quả Credit insurance
  • Trade finance has received special attention during the financial crisis as one of the potential culprits for the great trade collapse. Several researchers have used micro level data to establish the link between trade finance and trade, especially so during the financial crisis, and have found diverting results. This paper analyses the effect of trade credit on trade on a macro level through a whole cycle. We employ Berne Union data on export credit insurance, the most extensive dataset on trade credits available at the moment, for the period of 2005- 2011.

    pdf26p enter1cai 12-01-2013 23 2   Download

  • Since the approval of International Standard Banking Practice (ISBP) by the ICC Banking Commission in 2002, ICC Publication 645 has become an invaluable aid to banks, corporates, logistics specialists and insurance companies alike, on a global basis. Since the approval of international standard banking practive by the ICC banking.

    pdf36p pt1506 17-03-2009 2361 586   Download

  • The FDIC does not insure safe deposit boxes or their contents. The FDIC does not insure U.S. Treasury bills, bonds or notes, but these investments are backed by the full faith and credit of the United States government. How much insurance coverage does the FDIC provide? The standard maximum deposit insurance amount is described as the “SMDIA” in FDIC regulations.

    pdf0p nunongnuna 03-04-2013 19 6   Download

  • When I first started writing about credit scores more than a decade ago, few people knew what these three-digit numbers were or how they worked. Today most people have at least a vague understanding that credit scores are important. But they often don’t realize how important—until they get turned down for a loan or an apartment, or wind up paying more interest or higher insurance premiums than they expected.

    pdf242p baobinh1311 25-09-2012 25 4   Download

  • The Congress well understood the difficulty of predicting specific outcomes when it passed Truth in Lending. Rather than suggesting that the purpose of the act was to change markets or consumer behavior in some precise manner, the Congress instead stated less specifically that the act's intent was to improve information conditions generally so that consumers could avoid being "uninformed.

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  • This guide explains the different methods of getting paid and the different levels of risks involved. You should note that none of the methods outlined below will completely eliminate the payment risks associated with international trade, so you should consider your preferred payment option with care and hedge the risks along with appropriate credit insurance and credit checks on your customers.

    pdf6p anhsangthienthan1010 26-03-2010 467 147   Download

  • In January 2001 the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision has issued a consultative paper on the New Basel Capital Accord, that, once finalized, will replace the current Basel Accord from 1988 (Basel Committee 2001a). After an intensive consultation period with the banking industry and several modifications, the Basel Committee has outlined the future regulation of credit risks in the socalled third consultative paper that will be the basis for the final Basel II Accord. The proposed regulatory framework is based on three – mutually reinforcing – pillars...

    pdf841p taurus23 25-09-2012 136 101   Download

  • “Risk concentrations are arguably the single most important cause of major problems in banks”.1 On the one hand, dealing with concentration risk is important for the survival of individual banks; therefore, banks should be interested in a proper management of risk concentrations on their own. On the other hand, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) has found that nine out of the thirteen analyzed banking crises were affected by risk concentrations,2 which shows that this issue is important for the stability of the whole banking system.

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  • Welcome to the second edition of the Trade Finance Guide: A Quick Reference for U.S. Exporters. This guide is designed to help U.S. companies, especially small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), learn the basic fundamentals of trade finance so that they can turn their export opportunities into actual sales and achieve the ultimate goal of getting paid—especially on time—for those sales. This guide provides general information about common techniques of export financing.

    pdf32p kimngan_1 05-11-2012 39 16   Download

  • There is a choice of books on securitization, collateralized debt obligations (CDOs), and structured credit products. In fact, both of us have written other books on the subject. This book, however, was conceived as a short, handy and easy-to-comprehend guide to securitization, minus technical details. The idea originated while both of us were working on a comprehensive article on securitization: One which says it all in a limited space and serves as a curtain-raiser on the subject.

    pdf387p taurus23 25-09-2012 33 11   Download

  • Over the next decade, the two laws also will provide for about $900 billion in new subsidies, including a substantial expansion of Medicaid and new tax credits to offset the cost of health insurance premiums for low- and middle-income families and small businesses. In each state, exchanges will be established to facilitate the purchase of coverage and the delivery of the subsidies. Some companies whose workers receive subsidies for health insurance through the exchanges could be required to pay penalties.

    pdf44p quaivatxanh 01-12-2012 120 9   Download

  • Some small businesses will receive tax credits to offset their contributions to premiums. To be eligible, a company cannot employ more than 25 workers, and, in 2010, those workers must earn less than $50,000, on average. Beginning in 2014, the earnings threshold will be indexed to the consumer price index for urban workers (CPI-U). The legislation’s penalties apply to certain employers, as well as to individual people who do not obtain coverage. In particular, a company with at least 50 full-time employees that does not offer insurance could be subject to penalties.

    pdf40p quaivatxanh 01-12-2012 34 6   Download

  • In its report to the G7 titled Report of the Financial Stability Forum on Enhancing Market and Institutional Resilience, 1 the Financial Stability Forum (FSF) requested the Joint Forum to conduct a stocktaking of the uses of external credit ratings by its member authorities in the banking, securities and insurance sectors. The request also suggested that authorities review whether their regulations and/or supervisory policies unintentionally give credit ratings an official seal of approval that discourages investors from performing their own due diligence.

    pdf127p enterroi 01-02-2013 21 6   Download

  • Although social funds projects started with the short-term emergency objective, they are increasingly incorporating longer term service deliv- ery and capacity-building goals. The Portfolio Review found that around 80 percent of recent social funds projects, that is, those approved in fis- cal years 1994–96, had long-term objectives. As the objectives of social funds projects evolve over time, their design and implementation need to change as well. The yardsticks used to monitor performance should reflect evolving objectives.

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  • The need to train those who will be responsible for the O&M is an important institutional issue. Sometimes those responsible may be in the community, sometimes they may be a private contractor, or sometimes they may be in the ministry. User training is needed, par- ticularly in water supply and sanitation. Sanitation education has not always been provided and is very important. If the operator is going to be the sectoral agency, sometimes basic budgetary reforms need to be addressed.

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  • Replicability requires the consideration of sustainable ways by which services can be provided to unserved populations across a particular coun- try. To provide a sustainable level of service will, in some cases, require significant reforms: financial reforms at the sector level, reforms of bud- getary systems, reforms in subsidy levels, reforms of user charges, and so on. This is a tough menu of reforms to be carried out by social funds; indeed, social funds cannot undertake reforms of this extent.

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  • The second future path for social funds is as special-purpose vehicles, providing selective seed capital to foster innovations in community de- velopment, to experiment with new technologies, and to act as the government’s agent in remote areas and for very small-scale activities. Even though many of the social funds might already characterize them- selves as special-purpose vehicles, they have gotten much broader.

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  • And finally, while the World Bank gave them a B in targeting, in com- parison to other programs, the IDB probably would give them a B+, because they have really been very good at targeting the poor. Nicaragua’s social fund has projects in every town, in every backward part of Nicaragua, and this is fairly commonplace. Social funds are very good at targeting. There is, however, one issue with targeting.

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  • The Affordable Care Act increases insurance company accountability by supporting States’ review of premium increases, setting standards for the amount of premiums spent on benefits versus overhead (i.e., medical loss ratios), and posting insurance price information for transparency. A Small Business Health Care Tax Credit, reinsurance for early retirees, and premium assistance for uninsured people with pre-existing conditions have already provided targeted relief for millions of insured and uninsured Americans, and these changes are making a difference.

    pdf14p thangbienthai 27-11-2012 19 5   Download

  • In 2014, annual premiums are projected to fall compared to what they would have been without the Affordable Care Act. These savings could be as much as $2,300 for middle-income families purchasing through Exchanges. A low-income family of four with an income of $33,525 could save as much as $9,900 in premiums and $5,000 in cost sharing due to the extra help from new tax credits and cost sharing assistance. Small businesses, on average, could save up to $350 per family policy due to lower costs in the Exchanges and could get tax credits for up to 50 percent of...

    pdf24p thangbienthai 27-11-2012 24 5   Download

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