Cultural considerations

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  • The apparent division between cultural and linguistic approaches to translation that characterized much translation research until the 1980s is disappearing, partly because of shifts in linguistics that have seen that discipline take a more overtly cultural turn, partly because those who advocated an approach to translation rooted in cultural history have become less defensive about their position.

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  • Human development has different meanings depending on the area we will focus on. It is the ontogenetic process of individual development for psychologists. It considers systematic psychological changes in several areas, such as motor, cognitive, emotional, social, that occur in human beings over the course of their life span. To sociologists and economists, among others, human development is the consideration of the macrolevel countries or regions and their development conditions related to human needs.

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  • Spirulina are multicellular and filamentous blue-green microalgae belonging to two separate genera Spirulina and Arthrospira and consists of about 15 species. Of these, Arthrospira platensis is the most common and widely available spirulina and most of the published research and public health decision refers to this specific species. It grows in water, can be harvested and processed easily and has significantly high macro- and micronutrient contents. In many countries of Africa, it is used as human food as an important source of protein and is collected from natural water, dried and eaten....

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  • In essays with settings that range from the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming, to the mountain town of Leadville, Colorado, to the Pine Barrens of New Jersey, Trudy Dittmar weaves personal experience with diverse threads of subject matter to create unexpected connections between human nature and nature at large. Life stories, elegantly combined with mindful observations of animals, plants, landscape and the skies, theories in natural science, environmental considerations, and touches of art criticism and popular culture, offer insights into the linked analogies of nature and soul....

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  • Le Trong Trai et al. (2001) argued that with an abundance of heavily degraded land available for rehabilitation, forest management and other land uses, there is considerable potential for cash earning activities in the buffer zone (for example through economic crop plantations). This activity would also reduce the overall pressure on the forest resources in the nature reserve. They also suggested that current arrangements for forest development and management in the bare lands are costly, create social tensions and seem to be unsustainable in the long run.

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  • This interpretation establishes that:(i) when the terms of a financial liability are renegotiated with the creditor and the creditor accepts the company’s equity instruments to extinguish all or part of the liability, the instruments issued are considered to be part of the consideration paid to extinguish the financial liability; (ii) these instruments must be measured at their fair value, unless this cannot be reliably estimated, in which case the valuation of the new instruments must reflect the fair value of the financial liability settled; and (iii) the difference between the ca...

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  • This book examines the intersection of WTO trade liberalisation rules and domestic health protection, a subject that is of considerable interest to those concerned that the WTO impinges on national regulatory auto- nomy. In analysing the tension between health protection and trade liber- alisation, the book focuses on the way in which this tension is (or is not) resolved through the dispute resolution process.

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  • Webster’s Third New International Dictionary defines “esthetic” as “appreciative of, responsive to, or zealous about the beautiful; having a sense …of beauty or fine culture.” Each of us has a general sense of beauty. However, our own individual expression, interpretation, and experience make it unique, however much it is influenced by culture and self-image. What one culture perceives as disfigured may be beautiful to another. Chinese women once bound their feet, and Ubangis distend their lips.

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  • Although women account for more physician office visits than men, most women receive diagnoses and treatments based on what has worked for men. Until recently, medical research has largely ignored many health issues important to women, and women have long been under-represented in clinical trials. Many health education programs have realized this inequity and have begun to incorporate women’s health programs into their curriculum.

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  • Transportation of species to areas outside their native ranges has been a feature of human culture for millennia. During this time such activities have largely been viewed as beneficial or inconsequential. However, it has become increasingly clear that human-caused introductions of alien biota are an ecological disruption whose consequences rival those of better-known insults like chemical pollution, habitat loss, and climate change. Indeed, the irreversible nature of most alien-species introductions makes them less prone to correction than many other ecological problems.

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  • In  recent  years,  brackish  water  shrimp  culture  in  Quang  Tri  Province  has  developed  rapidly. Thanks to this development, lives of many local farmers have been improved, contributing  considerably  to  the  poverty  alleviation  goal.  However,  together  with  this  positive  impact,  policy‐ makers  and  shrimp  farmers  are  facing  several  issues  such 

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  • Universal access means that enough services and information are available, accessible and acceptable to meet the different needs of all individuals. This requires that people can safely reach services without travelling for a long time or distance, and that those with disabilities can easily access buildings. Services and treatments must be affordable, and based on principles of equity such that poor people do not bear a higher burden from the cost than more wealthy people.

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  • As the excerpt suggests, TDE.org acts as a resource hub for the world of design, and has over 600-catalogued entries. As of the time of writing, Under Consideration had taken TDE.org offline, due to a technical breakdown in the database. TDE.org has broad appeal, and was derived from the frustrations with a lack of comprehensive design knowledge across the Internet – frustrations not dissimilar to those of this thesis project. As with Wikipedia, TDE.org is a pool of information, but it does not attempt to show connections and commonalities between content.

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  • It is more difficult to justify the restriction which will be imposed in the following chapters on the word Ancient. This term is used even more vaguely and variously than the other. If generally it connotes the converse of "Modern," in some connections and particularly in the study of history the Modern is not usually understood to begin where the Ancient ended but to stand only for the comparatively Recent.

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  • Normally a preface will give a list of the names of friends who have taken the trouble to read drafts of the manuscript, but I have found myself spontaneously adopting a slightly different and, I believe, more rigorous course. In the final stages of writing, over the last two years or so, I have accepted offers to participate in workshops where I could attempt a dry run of my ideas. As a consequence the work has had considerable feedback, but a price of participation is that versions of parts of the work have been published or are being published....

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  • According to Barthes it is especially the mechanical and thus objective status of photographic depiction – the photograph as a non-coded message – that enhances the myth of naturalness, because by its tight coupling with the depict- ed world it naturalises the symbolic layers of meaning. Furthermore, it is on the level of style that human interventions manifest themselves and a shift from the natural to the culturally coded occurs, thus triggering another layer of mean- ing. It was this notion of style that Barthes (2004: 47) described as the ‘third’ or ‘obtuse’ meaning.

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  • CEPH accredits about 75 public health programs in a variety of kinds of institutions, e.g., MPH programs in medical schools. Some programs are not CEPH-accredited. Estimates gathered from 2007 (Association for Prevention Teaching and Research; unpublished survey) indicate that less than 1,300 graduates/year come from CEPH-accredited programs. 15 The number of graduates from unaccredited schools and programs is unknown. Several large, for-profit, online universities also offer public health pro- grams and degrees.

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  • The following will be discussed in this chapter: Development through the lifespan, making meaning of a life, length of life, quality of life, positive psychology, thinking about death, physiological considerations, cultural responses to death, the death of a young person,...

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  • Chapter 12 - Reflecting on life and death. The following will be discussed in this chapter: Development through the lifespan, making meaning of a life, length of life, quality of life, positive psychology, thinking about death, physiological considerations, cultural responses to death, the death of a young person,...

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  • When asked where landscape architects work, many people might point out their back door to the garden. It would be more accurate, however, to look out the front door. The landscape is anywhere and everywhere outdoors, and landscape architects are shaping the face of the Earth across cities, towns and countryside alike. Landscape architecture involves shaping and managing the physical world and the natural systems that we inhabit. Landscape architects do design gardens, but what is critical is that the garden, or any other outdoor space, is seen in context.

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