Xem 1-12 trên 12 kết quả Designing a connecting rod
  • In today’s practical and cost-conscious world, sheet-metal parts have already replaced many expensive cast, forged, and machined products. The reason is obviously the relative cheapness of stamped, or otherwise mass-produced parts, as well as greater control of their technical and aesthetic parameters. That the world slowly turned away from heavy, ornate, and complicated shapes, and replaced them with functional, simple, and logical forms only enhanced this tendency. Remember old bathtubs? They used to be cast and had ornamental legs.

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  • Welcome to Mastercam Solids Version 9. Mastercam Solids brings solid modeling to NC programmers with tools designed to make the line seamless between solids and machining. Mastercam Solids is an add-on to Mastercam Design, Mill Levels 1-3, Lathe Level 1, Wire Level 1, Router, and Router Pro. It is not included with any product. To help you learn Mastercam Solids, this tutorial and extensive online help accompany the product.

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  • Designing a Connecting Rod Trong chương này, bạn sẽ sử dụng hình học wireframe hiện có bao gồm các đường thẳng và vòng cung để tạo ra một mô hình vững chắc của một thanh kết nối cho xén cỏ. Bạn sẽ xây dựng kỹ năng mà bạn đã học trong chương trước và học các kỹ năng mới, chẳng hạn như: Tách dự thảo góc đường trung tâm của phần Tạo một ông chủ 180 độ xoay Kết hợp các hoạt động liên quan đến dây chuyền nhiều chamfering cạnh rắn...

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  • CONTENTS CONTENTS Internal Combustion Engine Parts C H A P T E R n 1125 Internal Combustion Engine Parts 1. Introduction. 2. Principal Parts of an I. C. Engine. 3. Cylinder and Cylinder Liner. 4. Design of a Cylinder. 5. Piston. 6. Design Considerations for a Piston. 7. Material for Pistons. 8. Piston Head or Crown . 9. Piston Rings. 10. Piston Barrel. 11. Piston skirt. 12. Piston Pin. 13. Connecting Rod. 14. Forces Acting on the Connecting Rod. 15. Design of Connecting Rod. 16. Crankshaft. 17. Material and Manufacture of Crankshafts. 18. Bearing Pressures and Stresses in Crankshafts.

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  • CONTENTS CONTENTS 600 C H A P T E R n A Textbook of Machine Design 16 Columns and Struts 1. Introduction. 2. Failure of a Column or Strut. 3. Types of End Conditions of Columns. 4. Euler’s Column Theory. 5. Assumptions in Euler’s Column Theory. 6. Euler’s Formula. 7. Slenderness Ratio. 8. Limitations of Euler’s Formula. 9. Equivalent Length of a Column. 10. Rankine’s Formula for Columns. 11. Johnson’s Formula for Columns. 12. Long Columns Subjected to Eccentric Loading. 13. Design of Piston Rod. 14. Design of Push Rods. 15. Design of Connecting Rod. 16.

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  • CONTENTS CONTENTS Cotter and Knuckle Joints C H A P T E R n 431 12 Cotter and Knuckle Joints 1. Introduction. 2. Types of Cotter Joints. 3. Socket and Spigot Cotter Joint. 4. Design of Socket and Spigot Cotter Joint. 5. Sleeve and Cotter Joint. 6. Design of Sleeve and Cotter Joint. 7. Gib and Cotter Joint. 8. Design of Gib and Cotter Joint for Strap End of a Connecting Rod. 9. Design of Gib and Cotter Joint for Square Rods. 10. Design of Cotter Joint to Connect Piston Rod and Crosshead. 11. Design of Cotter Foundation Bolt. 12. Knuckle Joint. 13. Dimensions of Various Parts...

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  • KEY EQUATIONS AND CHARTS FOR DESIGNING MECHANISMS FOUR-BAR LINKAGES AND TYPICAL INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS All mechanisms can be broken down into equivalent four-bar linkages. They can be considered to be the basic mechanism and are useful in many mechanical operations. FOUR-BAR LINKAGES—Two cranks, a connecting rod and a line between the fixed centers of the cranks make up the basic four-bar linkage. Cranks can rotate if A is smaller than B or C or D. Link motion can be predicted.

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  • Columns and Struts 1. Introduction. 2. Failure of a Column or Strut. 3. Types of End Conditions of Columns. 4. Euler’s Column Theory. 5. Assumptions in Euler’s Column Theory. 6. Euler’s Formula. 7. Slenderness Ratio. 8. Limitations of Euler’s Formula. 9. Equivalent Length of a Column. 10. Rankine’s Formula for Columns. 11. Johnson’s Formula for Columns. 12. Long Columns Subjected to Eccentric Loading. 13. Design of Piston Rod. 14. Design of Push Rods. 15. Design of Connecting Rod. 16. Forces Acting on a Connecting Rod. 16.

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  • CHAPTER 13 KEY EQUATIONS AND CHARTS FOR DESIGNING MECHANISMS FOUR-BAR LINKAGES AND TYPICAL INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS All mechanisms can be broken down into equivalent four-bar linkages. They can be considered to be the basic mechanism and are useful in many mechanical operations. FOUR-BAR LINKAGES—Two cranks, a connecting rod and a line between the fixed centers of the cranks make up the basic four-bar linkage. Cranks can rotate if A is smaller than B or C or D. Link motion can be predicted.

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  • Cotter and Knuckle Joints 1. Introduction. 2. Types of Cotter Joints. 3. Socket and Spigot Cotter Joint. 4. Design of Socket and Spigot Cotter Joint. 5. Sleeve and Cotter Joint. 6. Design of Sleeve and Cotter Joint. 7. Gib and Cotter Joint. 8. Design of Gib and Cotter Joint for Strap End of a Connecting Rod. 9. Design of Gib and Cotter Joint for Square Rods. 10. Design of Cotter Joint to Connect Piston Rod and Crosshead. 11. Design of Cotter Foundation Bolt. 12. Knuckle Joint. 13. Dimensions of Various Parts of the Knuckle Joint. 14. Methods of Failure of Knuckle...

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  • Internal Combustion Engine Parts 1. Introduction. 2. Principal Parts of an I. C. Engine. 3. Cylinder and Cylinder Liner. 4. Design of a Cylinder. 5. Piston. 6. Design Considerations for a Piston. 7. Material for Pistons. 8. Piston Head or Crown . 9. Piston Rings. 10. Piston Barrel. 11. Piston skirt. 12. Piston Pin. 13. Connecting Rod. 14. Forces Acting on the Connecting Rod. 15. Design of Connecting Rod. 16. Crankshaft. 17. Material and Manufacture of Crankshafts. 18. Bearing Pressures and Stresses in Crankshafts. 19. Design Procedure for Crankshaft. 20. Design for Centre Crankshaft. 21.

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  • A cotter is a flat wedge-shaped piece of steel as shown in figure-4.2.1.1. This is used to connect rigidly two rods which transmit motion in the axial direction, without rotation. These joints may be subjected to tensile or compressive forces along the axes of the rods. Examples of cotter joint connections are: connection of piston rod to the crosshead of a steam engine, valve rod and its stem etc.

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