Ecosystem change

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  • The Current State and Trends assessment presents the findings of the Condition and Trends Working Group of the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. This volume documents the current condition and recent trends of the world’s ecosystems, the services they provide, and associated human well-being around the year 2000. Its primary goal is to provide decision-makers, ecosystem managers, and other potential users with objective information and analyses of historical trends and dynamics of the interaction between ecosystem change and human well-being.

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  • The MA, which focused on ecosystem change and the impacts of such change on human well-being, included a set of sub-global assessments at multiple spatial scales, in addition to the global assessment. This was one of the innovations of the MA compared to other international assessments, which usually focus on global or regional scales alone. The global and sub-global assessments analyzed ecosystem services and human wellbeing from different perspectives and with different stakeholders involved.

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  • Competition, endangered, extinct, hazardous wastes, host, parasite, succession,... Are the words in the book "Mountains of the world". Invite you to consult the text book to grasp the pronunciation and set sentences with the words above.

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  • The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment was carried out between 2001 and 2005 to assess the consequences of ecosystem change for human well-being and to establish the scientific basis for actions needed to enhance the conservation and sustainable use of ecosystems and their contributions to human well-being.

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  • The idea for this book arose during the planning phases of an International Conference in Edmonton, Canada in July 2004 entitled “The Science of Changing Climates — Impacts on Agriculture, Forestry and Wetlands.” The conference was organized jointly by the Canadian Societies of Animal Science, Plant Science and Soil Science with support from Natural Resources Canada/Canadian Forest Service because they saw climate change as one of the most serious environmental problems facing the world....

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  • This book provides an interdisciplinary view of how to prepare the ecological and socio-economic systems to the reality of climate change. Scientifically sound tools are needed to predict its effects on regional, rather than global, scales, as it is the level at which socio-economic plans are designed and natural ecosystem reacts. The first section of this book describes a series of methods and models to downscale the global predictions of climate change, estimate its effects on biophysical systems and monitor the changes as they occur....

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  • Ecological issues and environmental problems have become exceedingly complex. Today, it is hubris to suppose that any single discipline can provide all the solutions for protecting and restoring ecological integrity. We have entered an age where professional humility is the only operational means for approaching environmental understanding and prediction.

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  • Our planet’s atmosphere is thought to have changed gradually and over a very wide range of CO2 concentrations throughout history. From ancient atmospheric gases trapped in ice bubbles, we have strong evidence indicating that atmospheric CO2 values reached minimum concentrations of approximately 180 parts per million during the Last Glacial Maximum, which was only 15,000 years ago. At the other extreme, calculations suggest that some 500 million years ago the atmospheric CO2 concentrations may have been about 4000 to 5000 parts per million....

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  • The world’s climate is changing, and it will continue to change throughout the 21st century and beyond. Rising temperatures, new precipitation patterns, and other changes are already affecting many aspects of human society and the natural world. Climate change is transforming ecosystems at extraordinary rates and scales.

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  • Human activities are affecting the global environment in myriad ways, with numerous direct and indirect effects on ecosystems. The climate and atmospheric composition of Earth are changing rapidly. Humans have directly modified half of the ice-free terrestrial surface and use 40% of terrestrial production. Our actions are causing the sixth major extinction event in the history of life on Earth and are radically modifying the interactions among forests, fields, streams, and oceans.

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  • This book addresses the significant environmental changes experienced by high latitude and high altitude ecosystems at the beginning of the 21st century. Increased temperatures and precipitation, reduction in sea ice and glacier ice, the increased levels of UV-radiation and the long-range transported contaminants in arctic and alpine regions are stress factors that challenge terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.

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  • The ocean absorbs a significant portion of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from human activities, equivalent to about one-third of the total emissions for the past 200 years from fossil fuel combustion, cement production and land use change (Sabine et al., 2004). Uptake of CO2 by the ocean benefits society by moderating the rate of climate change but also causes unprecedented changes to ocean chemistry, decreasing the pH of the water and leading to a suite of chemical changes collectively known as ocean acidification.

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  • Challenges to sustaining the productivity of oceanic and coastal fisheries have become more critical and complex as these fisheries reach the upper limits to ocean harvests. In addition, it is now clear that we are managing interactive and dynamic food webs rather than sets of independent single-species populations.

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  • The last few years have witnessed tremendous changes in the syllabi of environmentally related courses at Advanced Level and in tertiary education. Moreover, there have been major alterations in the way degree and diploma courses are organised in colleges and universities. Syllabus changes reflect the increasing interest in environmental issues, their significance in a political context and their increasing relevance in everyday life.

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  • The late Neogene (the period between − 14 and − 2.4 Ma) is one of the most interesting phases in understand the present conWguration of terrestrial ecosystems. It was during this time that the change took place from the middle Miocene dominant subtropical forests that stretched across southern Europe and western Asia to a more open but still wooded biotope that now prevails in warm–temperate areas. This change in vegetation, which strongly aVected the composition of mammalian faunas, seems to be linked to the rapid spread of grasses around 8–10 Ma ago....

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  • The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) was carried out between 2001 and 2005 to assess the consequences of ecosystem change for human well-being and to establish the basis for actions needed to enhance the conservation and sustainable use of ecosystems and their contributions to human well-being.

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  • The focus of the MA is on ecosystem services (the benefits people obtain from ecosystems), how changes in ecosystem services have affected human well-being in the past, and what role these changes could play in the present as well as in the future. The MA is an assessment of responses that are available to improve ecosystem management and can thereby contribute to the various constituents of human well-being. The specific issues addressed have been defined through consultation with the MA users.

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  • Conserving biodiversity and the ecosystem services that they provide is part of the larger objective of promoting human well-being and sustainable development. The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MEA) 2005 has brought about a fundamental change in the way that scientists perceive the role and value of biodiversity, and recognizes the dynamics and linkages between people, biodiversity and ecosystems. Human activities have direct and indirect impacts on biodiversity and ecosystems, which in turn affects the ecosystems services that they provide, and ultimately human well-being.

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  • Emission inventories play a dual role in global air pollution issues. Firstly, they can be used directly to establish the more important source categories, to identify trends in emissions and to examine the impact of different policy approaches. Secondly, emission inventories are used to drive atmospheric models applied to assess the environmental consequences of changing trace gas emissions and concentrations and to provide advice to policy makers. This second role contributes to the atmospheric modelling community being an important user of emission inventories.

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  • Large lakes are important because of their size and ecological distinctiveness, as well as their economic and cultural value. Optimal management of them requires a proper understanding of anthropogenic impacts, both on the lake ecosystems, as such and on the services they provide for society. The specific structural and functional properties of large lakes, e.g. morphology, hydrography, biogeochemical cycles, and food-web structure, are all directly related to their size.

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