Engineering toxins

Xem 1-6 trên 6 kết quả Engineering toxins
  • ‘Engineering Toxins for 21st Century Therapies’ (9–10 September 2010) was part of the Royal Society International Seminar series held at the Kavli International Centre, UK. Participants were assembled from a range of disciplines (academic, industry, regulatory, public health) to discuss the future potential of toxin-based therapies.

    pdf6p cosis54 05-01-2013 14 3   Download

  • This book aspires to be a comprehensive summary of current biofuels issues and thereby contribute to the understanding of this important topic. Readers will find themes including biofuels development efforts, their implications for the food industry, current and future biofuels crops, the successful Brazilian ethanol program, insights of the first, second, third and fourth biofuel generations, advanced biofuel production techniques, related waste treatment, emissions and environmental impacts, water consumption, produced allergens and toxins....

    pdf0p ktcn_1 10-07-2012 95 20   Download

  • Renewable energy sources such as solar power, wind power, hydroelectric power, geothermal power, and so on have attracted much attention as alternatives to fossil fuels, because toxins and pollutants are not produced by these sources. For this reason, these energy sources have come to be known as clean energy.

    pdf186p 123859674 04-07-2012 26 12   Download

  • The two prerequisites for the successful engineering of an organ are suitable cells and a biomaterial or extra celluar matrix component. A large variety of cells has been proposed for the use in tissue engineering, including pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESC) with all their ethical controversies, adult stem cells found in most tissues, and committed precursor cells. While the plasticity of ESC offers the potential to grow an entire organ from a single cell source, the clear differentiation of these cells remains challenging....

    pdf190p kmkmkmkmkm 08-09-2012 38 4   Download

  • Diverse human-produced organic chemicals can enter surface and groundwater through human activities, including pesticide use and industrial processes, and as breakdown products of other chemicals (Carr and Neary 2008). Many of these pollutants, including pesticides and other non-metallic toxins, are used globally, persist in the environment, and can be transported long ranges to regions where they have never been produced (UNEP 2009).

    pdf0p saimatkhauroi 01-02-2013 19 3   Download

  • The determination of the receptor-binding region of Cry toxins produced byBacillus thuringiensisis expected to facilitate an improvement in their insecticidal ability through protein engineering. We analyzed the region on Cry1Aa molecules involved in interactions with the cadherin-like protein receptor BtR175 using cysteine-substituted mutant toxins and several syn-thetic peptides corresponding to the loops in domain 2.

    pdf11p viettel02 20-02-2013 9 1   Download

CHỦ ĐỀ BẠN MUỐN TÌM

Đồng bộ tài khoản