Freshwater resources

Xem 1-20 trên 27 kết quả Freshwater resources
  • Published in Phnom Penh in October 2002 by the. Mekong River Commission ... This paper was compiled by M.J. Phillips, with contributions from those listed in the .Thailand is blessed with an abundance of marine and freshwater resources. in 2002 it ranked in the top-ten fishing nations of the world. Thailand is also recognised for the advances it has made in developing its aquaculture sector. Capture...

    pdf65p anhtuyet 10-06-2009 87 21   Download

  • Limitations on the availabilityof water resourcesareamong the greatest challenges facing modern society, despite the fact that roughly 70% of the earth’s surface is covered by water. Human society depends on liquid freshwater resources to meet drinking, sanitation and hy‐ giene, agriculture, and industry needs.Roughly 97% of the earth’s surface and shallow sub‐ surface water is saline and about 2% is frozen in glaciers and polar ice.

    pdf342p lyly_5 22-03-2013 24 9   Download

  • Water is finite on earth. There is a fixed amount of water which neither decreases or increases. Fresh water is a renewable resource because of the water cycle. From a human perspective the source of freshwater is rainfall. Most of this rainfall is used directly for vegetative growth, such as natural vegetation, pasture, rain-fed maize etc. This process, known as transpiration, is highly productive and produces in Southern Africa the bulk of food crops.

    pdf102p thanhtrinhqc 10-05-2013 48 14   Download

  • Thailand is blessed with an abundance of marine and freshwater resources. In 2002 it ranked in the top-ten fishing nations of the world. Thailand is also recognised for the advances it has made in developing its aquaculture sector. Capture fisheries and aquaculture in the Thai portion of the Lower Mekong Basin are a major component of these aquatic resources. It has been estimated from fish consumption studies that the average annual yield of inland fish is around 795,000 tonnes.

    pdf56p nguyenngocsonctu 01-12-2010 84 20   Download

  • Wetland ecosystems are a natural resource of global significance.Historically, their high level of plant and animal (especially bird) diversity is perhaps the major reason why wetland protection has become a high priority worldwide, supported by international agreements, such as the Ramsar Convention and the International Convention of Biological Diversity (Fig. 1.1).

    pdf365p huetay_1 28-02-2013 33 17   Download

  • According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the impacts of climate chang on the water cycle are already evident and projected to increase substantially in the futur Climate change impacts the quantity and qua of freshwater resources and the frequency of extreme events, such as floods and droughts While climate change is only one of many drivers increasing pressure on water resource its impact is projected to be significant and to accelerate over time. Climate change reinforc and adds urgency to the case for good water resources management more generally.

    pdf358p lulaula 25-10-2012 30 11   Download

  • Global Warming has become perhaps the most complicated issue being faced by world leaders. Thus, it requires field of attention for many modern societies, power and energy engineers, academicians, researchers and stakeholders. The so-called consensus in the past century anthropogenically induced Global Warming, has recently been disputed by rising number of climate change panelists.

    pdf364p cucdai_1 16-10-2012 34 7   Download

  • A brief synthesis of the state of the environment is given using the main themes in AEO-1 as the baseline, but discussing this within the context of the Brundtland report and the programme areas of NEPAD-EAP. Where appropriate, the general regional situation has been placed in the global context. Six thematic areas, forming the basis of the chapters, have been used in the analysis – Atmosphere, Land, Freshwater, Forests and Woodlands, Coastal and Marine Environments, and Biodiversity.

    pdf576p yeutinh98 26-09-2012 27 4   Download

  • Climate change can also be expected to have serious consequences on water resources. Melting glaciers, higher intensity and more variable rainfall events, and increasing temperatures will contribute to increased inland flooding, water scarcity and decreasing water quality. Overall, the greatest human requirement for freshwater resources is for crop irrigation, particularly for farming in arid regions and in the great paddy fields of Asia.

    pdf76p yeurauxanh88 01-10-2012 20 4   Download

  • Intensity of use of freshwater resources (both surface and groundwater) is expressed as gross abstractions per capita, as a percentage of total available renewable freshwater resources, including inflows from neighbouring countries (see below) and as a percentage of internal resources. It has to be noted that when measured at national level these indicators may hide significant variations at territorial level. Wastewater treatment connection rates show the percentage of the national population actually connected to public waste water treatment plants.

    pdf65p lulaula 25-10-2012 21 4   Download

  • Effective solutions to water quality challenges exist and have been implemented in a number of places. It is time for a global focus on protecting and improving the quality of the world’s freshwater resources. There are three fundamental solutions to water quality problems: (1) prevent pollution; (2) treat polluted water; and (3) restore ecosystems.

    pdf54p saimatkhauroi 01-02-2013 16 3   Download

  • A classic example of a water system severely affected by hu- man development is the Aral Sea, fed by the Amu Darya and Syr Darya. The Aral Sea was once the fourth largest inland body of water in the world, after Lake Superior, supporting 24 unique species of fish and a large fishing population. The Soviet Union built a series of dams and irrigation systems to divert river flows in order to grow cotton on around 3 million hectares of new farmland, but these massive freshwater withdrawals (first order impacts) led to the shrinking of the Sea and a corresponding increase in...

    pdf0p saimatkhauroi 01-02-2013 20 3   Download

  • As a result, there is little awareness regarding the fact that the organization and characteristics of a production and supply chain strongly influence the volumes (and temporal and spatial distribution) of water consumption and pollution that can be associated with a final consumer product. Hoekstra and Chapagain (2008) have shown that visualizing the hidden water use behind products can help in understanding the global character of fresh water and in quantifying the effects of consumption and trade on water resources use.

    pdf98p saimatkhauroi 01-02-2013 18 3   Download

  • The landmass on which we live is an integral part of our water catchment. Any human activity will inevitably have some consequences on the availability and composition of fresh waters. These consequences are becoming increasingly important and detectable as the human population grows. The problem is to be addressed at the global scale, as frequently, decisions made have inter-regional and international impacts, and must therefore be coordinated. In a number of European Member States, for example, the availability of water resources depends on the activities of other upstream countries.

    pdf0p phoebe75 01-02-2013 20 3   Download

  • Four major changes have taken place following these scandals. First, the nature of the audit industry has changed. Three of the Big 4 audit firms have either divested or publicly announced plans to divest their consulting businesses. 2 Second, Arthur Andersen, formerly one of the Big 5 audit firms, has gone out of business. Third, in July 2002, President George W. Bush signed the Sarbanes-Oxley Bill (also known as the Corporate Oversight Bill) into law. This law imposes a number of corporate governance rules on all public companies with stock traded in the United States.

    pdf46p bin_pham 06-02-2013 21 3   Download

  • The world’s major food items, core requirements for human health, come from wetland ecosystems. Rice, a staple food item for almost half the world’s popu- lation, is grown in a wide range of environments, mostly wetland ecosystems. Rice receives 35–45% of the world’s irrigation water and some 24–30% of developed freshwater resources.

    pdf358p quygia123 06-11-2012 24 2   Download

  • Charities and Congregations Are Ready and Willing. We asked respondents how many additional volunteers their organization could absorb and utilize effectively, given their present capacity to manage or work with volunteers and given unlimited availability of volunteers. Fully 91 percent of charities and 96 percent of congregational social service outreach programs said they could currently take on at least some additional volunteers at present capacity. Demand for Volunteers among Charities Is High.

    pdf38p dacotaikhoan 26-04-2013 10 2   Download

  • Human beings have a powerful effect on the environment, as is becoming increasingly clear. Demographic factors are commonly recognized as one of the primary global drivers of human-induced environmental change, along with biophysical, economic, sociopolitical, technological, and cultural factors. Concerns about demographic effects on the environment are

    pdf1p trinhosieupham 06-02-2013 18 1   Download

  • As the global population grows and many developing countries modernize, the importance of water supply and water treatment becomes a much greater factor in the welfare of nations. In similar fashion, the need to address both domestic and industrial wastes generated by these nations moves higher on the scale of importance. Clearly, in today’s world the competition for water resources coupled with the unfortunate commingling of wastewater discharges with freshwater supplies creates additional pressure on treatment systems....

    pdf1357p tuananhhumg 13-10-2012 69 40   Download

  • The water problems in Asia’s cities are similar. These include sources and uses of raw water, the large propor-tion of water loss in distribution networks, intermittent supply, and the quality of tap water. In some cities, the excessive use of groundwater resources has caused serious environmental problems, including rapid deple-tion of groundwater, deterioration of water quality, and land subsidence.

    pdf228p namde03 19-03-2013 23 9   Download

Đồng bộ tài khoản