Historians of science

Xem 1-18 trên 18 kết quả Historians of science
  • Scientific realism has been advanced as an interpretation of the natural sciences but never the behavioral sciences. This exciting book introduces a novel version of scientific realism--Measured Realism--that characterizes the kind of theoretical progress in the social and psychological sciences that is uneven but indisputable. Trout proposes a theory of measurement--Population-Guided Estimation--that connects natural, psychological, and social scientific inquiry.

    pdf256p banhkem0908 24-11-2012 19 2   Download

  • Sincemany excellent treatises on the history ofmathemat- ics are available, there may seem little reason for writing still another. But most current works are severely techni- cal, written by mathematicians for other mathematicians or for historians of science. Despite the admirable schol- arship and often clear presentation of these works, they are not especially well adapted to the undergraduate classroom. (Perhaps the most notable exception is Howard Eves’s popular account, An Introduction to the History of Mathematics.

    pdf795p tiramisu0908 30-10-2012 71 31   Download

  • In a classic paper by the late Yale historian of science, Derek De Solla Price (1965), based mainly on the study of citations in a single scientific research field, it was shown how citations in a developing research area have a strong 'immediacy effect'.1 Citation was found to be at a maximum for papers about two-and-a-half years old, and the 'major work of a paper ... [is] finished after 10 years', as judged by citations.

    pdf0p beobobeo 01-08-2012 47 12   Download

  • The exact relations between science and technology in particular have been debated by scientists, historians, and policymakers in the late 20th century, in part because the debate can inform the funding of basic and applied science. In the immediate wake of World War II, for example, in the United States it was widely considered that technology was simply "applied science" and that to fund basic science was to reap technological results in due time.

    pdf354p ngoctu2396 28-11-2012 25 7   Download

  • In the year 1844 electricity, last and mightiest of the servants of man, was seized and harnessed and made to do practical work. A telegraph line was erected between Washington and Baltimore. [Footnote: See Invention of the Telegraph.] In 1846 mathematics achieved perhaps the greatest triumph of abstract science. It pointed out where in the heavens there should be a planet, never before known by man. Strong telescopes were directed to the spot and the planet was discovered. [Footnote: See The Discovery of Neptune.

    pdf204p nhokheo9 06-05-2013 24 7   Download

  • Biologists study living things, but what do philosophers of biology study? A cynic might say “their own navels,” but I am no cynic. A better answer is that philosophers of biology, and philosophers of science generally, study science. Ours is a second-order, not a first-order, subject. In this respect, philosophy of science is similar to history and sociology of science. A difference may be found in the fact that historians and sociologists study science as it is, whereas philosophers of science study science as it ought to be.

    pdf414p banhkem0908 24-11-2012 24 4   Download

  • The present volume, compiled in honor of an outstanding historian of science, physicist and exceptional human being, Sam Schweber, is unique in assembling a broad spectrum of positions on the history of science by some of its leading representatives. Readers will find it illuminating to learn how prominent authors judge the current status and the future perspectives of their field. Students will find this volume helpful as a guide in a fragmented field that continues to be dominated by idiosyncratic expertise and still lacks a methodical canon.

    pdf628p thienbinh1311 13-12-2012 26 3   Download

  • In the fullness of time, our progress in understanding the natural order advances through the process of science, and psychology is no exception. To gain perspectives on this progress, one needs to take the long view of a historian. In so doing, one will come to appreciate the role of great ideas and creative individuals, while at the same time realizing that our cumulative progress is greater than any one idea or individual.

    pdf448p crius75 09-01-2013 36 3   Download

  • Professor Maspero does not need to be introduced to us. His name is well known in England and America as that of one of the chief masters of Egyptian science as well as of ancient Oriental history and archaeology. Alike as a philologist, a historian, and an archaeologist, he occupies a foremost place in the annals of modern knowledge and research.

    pdf136p nhokheo9 06-05-2013 18 3   Download

  • The declaration of "the rights of man and of citizens" by the French Constituent Assembly on August 26, 1789, is one of the most significant events of the French Revolution. It has been criticised from different points of view with directly opposing results. The political scientist and the historian, thoroughly appreciating its importance, have repeatedly come to the conclusion that the Declaration had no small part in the anarchy with which France was visited soon after the storming of the Bastille.

    pdf74p nguyenhuucanh1212 23-01-2013 22 2   Download

  • Dr Samuel Johnson is reputed to have said ‘what is written without effort is in general read without pleasure’. This edition of Principles and Practice of Soil Science has certainly taken much effort to complete, so I hope it will be enjoyed and provide valuable information to as wide an audience of interested readers as possible.

    pdf387p huetay_1 28-02-2013 47 21   Download

  • History of the United States Samuel Eliot, a historian and educator, was born in Boston in 1821, graduated at Harvard in 1839, was engaged in business for two years, and then travelled and studied abroad for four years more. On his return, he took up tutoring and gave gratuitous instruction to classes of young workingmen. He became professor of history and political science in Trinity College, Hartford, Conn., in 1856, and retained that chair until 1864. During the last four years of that time, he was president of the institution. From 1864 to 1874 he lectured on constitutional law...

    pdf260p nguyenhuucanh1212 23-01-2013 19 5   Download

  • The textbook written by Paul Davies in 19891 entitled, The New Physics, commenced with the following opinion. Many elderly scientists look back nostalgically at the first 30 years of the 20th century, and refer to it as the golden age of physics. Historians, however, may come to regard those years as the dawning of the New Physics. The events which the quantum and relativity theories set in train are only now impinging on science, and many physicists believe that the golden age was only the beginning of the revolution....

    pdf0p gian_anh 18-10-2012 31 4   Download

  • Nicolaus Copernicus and Galileo Galilei developed the scientific knowledge that became the underpinning of spaceflight. Edward Everett Hale in ‘‘The Brick Moon’’ and Jules Verne in ‘‘From the Earth to the Moon’’ dreamed and wrote about it. But finally in the last half of the twentieth century, it was the Americans and the Soviet Russians, locked in the throes of the Cold War, who accomplished it.

    pdf0p tom_123 14-11-2012 33 4   Download

  • historian's note: The following statements are extracted from depositions taken by the Commission of Formal Inquiry appointed by the Peloric Rehabilitation Council, a body formed as a provisional government in the third month of the Calamity.

    pdf17p transang7 10-01-2013 17 3   Download

  • C H A P T E R T H I R T Y - T H R E E Mathematical Modeling as an Exegetical Tool: Rational Reconstruction 33.1.1 Rational reconstruction According to Lakatos, RR is equivalent to what he calls internal history: a putatively diachronic account of what counts as “growth of knowledge” or “progress in science” – as “progress” is adjudicated by the particular normative methodology favored by the historian.

    pdf18p thegun16 24-11-2010 30 2   Download

  • About Harmon: James Judson Harmon, aka Jim Harmon (born 1933), is an American short story author and popular culture historian who has written extensively about the Golden Age of Radio. He sometimes wrote under the pseudonym Judson Grey, and occasionally he was labeled Mr. Nostalgia. During the 1950s and 1960s, Harmon wrote for if, Venture Science Fiction Magazine, Galaxy Science Fiction, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction and other magazines. The best of his science fiction stories were recently reprinted in Harmon's Galaxy (Cosmos Books, 2004) with an introduction by Richard A.

    pdf27p transang7 08-01-2013 20 2   Download

  • “The study of economics does not seem to require any specialized gifts of an unusually high order. Is it not, intellectually regarded, a very easy subject compared with the higher branches of philosophy or pure science? Yet good, or even competent, economists are the rarest of birds. An easy subject, at which few excel! The paradox finds its explanation, perhaps, in that the master-economist must possess a rare combination of gifts. He must reach a high standard in several different directions and must combine talents not often found together.

    pdf15p hoangphiyeah1tv 18-04-2013 25 2   Download

Đồng bộ tài khoản