Managerial implications

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  • Chapter 11 - Capital budgeting decisions. The term capital budgeting is used to describe how managers plan significant cash outlays on projects that have long-term implications, such as the purchase of new equipment and the introduction of new products. This chapter describes several tools that can be used by managers to help make these types of investment decisions.

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  • The term capital budgeting is used to describe how managers plan significant cash outlays on projects that have long-term implications, such as the purchase of new equipment and the introduction of new products. This chapter describes several tools that can be used by managers to help make these types of investment decisions.

    ppt14p tangtuy10 04-05-2016 6 2   Download

  • Appendix 3B: The predetermined overhead rate and capacity. After studying this chapter, you should be able to understand the implications of basing the predetermined overhead rate on activity at capacity rather than on estimated activity for the period.

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  • Chapter 13 - Capital budgeting decisions. The term capital budgeting is used to describe how managers plan significant cash outlays on projects that have long-term implications, such as the purchase of new equipment and the introduction of new products. This chapter describes several tools that can be used by managers to help make these types of investment decisions.

    ppt28p tangtuy17 05-07-2016 3 2   Download

  • Appendix 4A: The predetermined overhead rate and capacity. The predetermined overhead rate and capacity. After studying this chapter, you should be able to understand the implications of basing the predetermined overhead rate on activity at capacity rather than on estimated activity for the period.

    ppt9p tangtuy18 12-07-2016 3 2   Download

  • The term capital budgeting is used to describe how managers plan significant cash outlays on projects that have long-term implications, such as the purchase of new equipment and the introduction of new products. This chapter describes several tools that can be used by managers to help make these types of investment decisions.

    ppt19p tangtuy18 12-07-2016 2 2   Download

  • The need for reducing the project duration occurs for many reasons such as imposed duration dates, time-to-market considerations, incentive contracts, key resource needs, high overhead costs, or simply unforeseen delays. This chapter presented a logical, formal process for assessing the implications of situations that involve shortening the project duration.

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  • Chapter 9 - Reducing project duration. The need for reducing the project duration occurs for many reasons such as imposed duration dates, time-to-market considerations, incentive contracts, key resource needs, high overhead costs, or simply unforeseen delays. This chapter presented a logical, formal process for assessing the implications of situations that involve shortening the project duration.

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  • Chapter 10 provides knowledge of long-term liabilities. In this chapter, the learning objectives are: Explain the types and payment patterns of notes, compare bond financing with stock financing, assess debt features and their implications, compute the debt-to-equity ratio and explain its use, prepare entries to record bond issuance and interest expense, compute and record amortization of bond discount, compute and record amortization of bond premium, record the retirement of bonds,...

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  • Challenges faced by supply chains appear to be growing exponentially under the demands of increasingly complex business environments confronting the decision makers. The world we live in now operates under interconnected economies that put extra pressure on supply chains to fulfil ever-demanding customer preferences. Relative attractiveness of manufacturing as well as consumption locations changes very rapidly, which in consequence alters the economies of large scale production. C

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  • This text offers business school students an excellent practical explanation of the short-term linkages in the macroeconomic arena. While the underlying theoretical constructs are not ignored, emphasis is placed on the empirical underpinnings and managerial implications of macroeconomics. The text begins by introducing key concepts such as the GDP, National and Personal Income, and the various measures of inflation and unemployment.

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  • Chapter 13 explores the economic and managerial implications of this basic idea. After studying this chapter, you should understand: How to calculate expected returns, the impact of diversifi cation, the systematic risk principle, the security market line and the risk-return trade-off.

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  • Chapter 7 - Social perception and attributions. After reading the material in this chapter, you should be able to: Describe perception in terms of the social information processing model; explain seven managerial implications of social perception; explain according to Kelley’s model, how external and internal causal attributions are formulated;...

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  • Chapter 4 - Understanding social perception and managing diversity. After reading the material in this chapter, you should be able to: Describe perception in terms of the social information processing model; explain seven managerial implications of social perception; explain according to Kelley’s model, how external and internal causal attributions are formulated;...

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  • Fourth, the model provides a rational to the empirical …nding that volatility factors are priced in the cross section of stock returns. In the current model, stock return volatility factors are driven by systematic risk factors: sentiment and solvency risks. These factors, which drive volatility factors, are shown to be priced across di¤erent stocks in an equilibrium consumption CAPM.

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  • Chapter 10 - Corporate governance. Studying this chapter should provide you with the strategic management knowledge needed to: Define corporate governance and explain why it is used to monitor and control managers’strategic decisions, explain why ownership has been largely separated from managerial control in the modern corporation, define an agency relationship and managerial opportunism and describe their strategic implications,...

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  • Chapter 18 entitled 'Management of waiting lines' deals with waiting lines which commonly occur in all service systems. Management of queues is governed by a theory what has come to be known as 'queuing theory'. Queuing theory is directly applicable to a wide range of service operations, including call centers, banks, post offices, restaurants, theme parks, telecommunications systems, and traffic management.

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  • The purposes of this handbook are to provide a forum for presentation of the current state of knowledge about women in business and management and to specify the directions for future research that will be most constructive for advancing the representation, treatment, quality of life and success of women who work in these fi elds. In this sense, we hope that the Handbook on Women in Business and Management will serve as a reference for recent advances in research and theory, informing both scholars and those with a general interest in the subject....

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  • Finally, and perhaps most crucial from a strategic viewpoint, profits produce a short-term managerial focus. Rising earnings can easily disguise a decline in shareholder value because earnings ignore the future implications of current activities. For example, earnings can quickly be boosted by cutting advertising or customer service levels. In the short run this is beneficial, but in the long run it will erode the company’s market share, future earnings and shareholder value.

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  • Prior beliefs about pricing models can be useful to someone investing in mutual funds. A pricing model implies that a combination of the model's benchmark assets provides the highest Sharpe ratio within a passive universe. That implication is useful to an investor seeking a high Sharpe ratio, even if the investor has less than complete con¯dence in the model's pricing accuracy and cannot invest directly in the benchmarks. Prior beliefs about managerial skill are also important in the investment decision.

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