Xem 1-10 trên 10 kết quả Nutritional metals
  • Trace Mineral Intake Zinc 2.5–4 mg/d, an additional 10–15 mg/d per L of stool or ileostomy output Copper 0.5–1.5 mg/d, possibility of retention in biliary tract obstruction Manganese 0.1–0.

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  • Th i s book wi 11 be of great interest to anyone concerned with animal feeds and feeding programs whether one is studying bovine, porcine, equine, avian or lower vertebrate (fish and eel) nutrition. This information is critical to the success of an animal feeding program. Somet imes the di fference between a successful and a failing program can be traced to mineral deficiencies which cause either abnormal growth, reduced milk production, interrupted fertility and breeding, compromised immune system integrity and/or decrement in normal hemoglobin concentration.

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  • Plant response to reduced water availability and other abiotic stress (e.g. metals) have been analysed through changes in water absorption and transport mechanisms and also by molecular and genetic approach. A relatively new aspects of fruit nutrition are presented in order to provide the basis for the improvement of some fruit quality traits. The involvement of hormones, nutritional and proteomic plant profiles together with some structure/function of sexual components have also been addressed.

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  • Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy is an analytical technique used for the qualitative and quantitative determination of the elements present in different samples like food, nanomaterials, biomaterials, forensics, and industrial wastes. The main aim of this book is to cover all major topics which are required to equip scholars with the recent advancement in this field. The book is divided into 12 chapters with an emphasis on specific topics.

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  • 10 Copper Copper is one of the oldest known metals and is the 25th most abundant element in the Earth’s crust. The words ‘aes Cyprium’ appeared in Roman writings describing copper, to denote that much of the metal at the time came from Cyprus.

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  • Vanadium. The transition element vanadium exists mostly in the 3, 4, and 5 oxidation states (Table 21.1), with the 4 and 5 states predominating under oxidizing conditions in the normal soil acidity of below pH 8 (1,2). Vanadium, with many other heavy metals, is released by anthropogenic activity.

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  • 18 Selenium Selenium (Se), a beneficial element, is one of the most widely distributed elements on Earth, having an average soil abundance of 0.09 mg kg1 (1). It is classified as a Group VI A metalloid, having metallic and nonmetallic properties. Selenium was identified in 1818 by the Swedish chemist

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  • The metal gates positioned on each side of the Level Crossing are approximately 4.3 m wide and open away from the railway. The surface of the intersection of the road with the track is covered in rubber „Strail‟ units, which gives a level surface over the track. Cattle grids are installed on each side of the roadway, where it crosses the track to prevent cattle straying onto the railway line. There is concrete post and wire fencing running between the gates and the boundary hedges, see Photograph 2. There is a residential house...

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  • Chelators: Chelated iron and other chelated nutrients are used when a direct dose of a particular nutrient is needed to quickly solve a deficiency. Chelated products are organic compounds with attached inorganic metal molecules, which are more available for plant use. Compost, humus, humic acid, and microorganisms have natural chelating properties. Chemically, lime is the oxide of calcium, with the formula CaO. It occurs in limestone, marble, and chalk as calcium carbonate. Finely ground limestone is the best form to use because it will be more available to plants.

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  • Using the gradient method, element concentrations within the lichen are usually observed to increase as the distance to the suspected source decreases. Gough and Erdman (1977) used linear regression to evaluate the relationship between distance from a coal fired power plant and metal levels in Xanthoparmelia chlorochroa. However, as Puckett (1988) points out, concentrations of many elements will not reach zero at large distances from pollution sources because they have essential nutritional roles or are normal components of the lichen when growing in its natural environment.

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