Political ecology

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  • Lecture Political Ecology of Dr. Annuska Derks is about: Identifying broader system, viewing ecological systems as power-laden, taking an explicitly normative approach.

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  • The discipline of Landscape Ecology is rapidly emerging as a motive force, both in the domain of theoretical ecology, and in applied fields such as biodiversity conservation planning. Without it and its further development, the more reductionist elements of, and approaches to, ecology will continue to make the discipline decreasingly relevant to land management, which will be made totally on the basis of politics and socioeconomics.

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  • Even though human-induced species extinction presently seems to rank low on peoples’ attention scale compared to other political and societal topics, this does not mean that its significance in earth history or its ecological consequences have diminished in any way. It must repeatedly be made clear that if current trends continue, within the next one hundred years half of all our planet’s species will most likely have become extinct.

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  • In this edited volume, global experts in ecology and evolutionary biology explore how theories in ecology elucidate the processes of invasion, while also examining how specific invasions inform ecological theory. This reciprocal benefit is highlighted in a number of scales of organization: population, community and biogeographic. The text describes example invaders in all major groups of organisms and from a number of regions around the globe.

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  • When we eventually look back at the intellectual shibboleths of the high capitalist period—say the last three centuries—few ingrained assumptions will look so wrongheaded or so globally destructive as the common-sense separation of society and nature. Historically and geographically, most societies have avoided such a stark presumption as hubristic folly, but from physicists to sociologists, physicians to poets, the brains of the ascendant capitalist “west” not only embraced but made a virtue of society’s separation from nature (and vice versa).

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  • Before continuing to read this book, stop, place this volume back on the shelf and take a moment to look through the pages of an illustrated atlas of the world. At least half of this atlas will probably be given over to illustrating one of the dominant political ordering principles around which our world continues to be constructed and conceived—the nation-state. If your atlas is similar to ours, however, you will also notice that nation-states are not only represented and recognized according to their territorial shape and oYcial political nomenclature....

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  • Contents Sources and acknowledgements 4 The area under study 6 Summary 11 1. Introduction 17 2. Ecological borders and the creation of the Kafia Kingi enclave 19 3. Borders between states and statelessness: Darfur and Bahr al-Ghazal in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries 26 4. Being Fertit: people and societies in Western Bahr al-Ghazal and the Kafia Kingi enclave 38 5. The 1930–46 Southern Policy: drawing a cultural and religious border 61 6. Delineations: the political border 71 7. Border economies and the social meaning of roads,...

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  • Knowing nature is a complex, multiple, and highly political process. This is clearly illustrated by looking at the knowledge and management of a piece of land, seemingly isolated but impacting and impacted by decision- making processes, politics, and technology around the world. A barren stretch of ground in the Sahelian region of West Africa holds diverse meanings to different people and institutions. Livestock herders value it for its proximity to a water point and for the grass it will grow once the rains come.

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  • Microbes produce an extraordinary array of microbial defense systems. These include broad-spectrum classical antibiotics, metabolic byproducts, such as the lactic acids produced by lactobacilli, lytic agents such as lysozymes, numerous types of protein exotoxins, and bacteriocins, which are loosely defined as biologically active protein moieties with a bacteriocidal mode of action.

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  • Contemporary interest in food is not confined to pleasure in its consumption, but extends in every direction: to its economic importance, the semiotics of food taste, the dangers of food additives and the politics of food security. We live in societies as dominated by food preferences as by sexual preferences, as obsessed about eating too little as by eating too much. In addition our interest in food is associated, for good and evil, with our interest in ‘nature’.

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  • Simply put, this book is about how nature is ‘done’, how it is practised, how it materializes as an active partner in and through those practices. Perhaps, unlike many other volumes, I am not especially concerned here with how nature is imagined, represented, thought or conceived. Rather, imagining, representing and thinking are treated as activities which take their place alongside many other practices (like growing, infecting, digging, counting), some of which do not have people at their centre. This last point is crucial.

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  • 1 Introduction: A new ecology is needed 1.1 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT HAS CHANGED The political agenda imposed on ecologists and environmental managers has changed since the early 1990s. Since the Rio Declaration and Agenda 21 the focus has been on sustainability

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  • The current problem with the human system of resource use and residual disposal is that it is wildly out of equilibrium. Competition among humans is such that we slaughter thousands of our own species annually on the roads in our haste to get somewhere faster; we let millions of babies die every year for want of clean water and a modest diet; we deliberately kill more millions of people in war, often to secure access to dwindling resources. In the last fifty years we have become more aware that our patho- logical drive for 'more' has poisoned the land, the water and the air.

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  • The Baltic Sea is one of the most investigated water bodies in the world. For decades, the many highly industrialised nations around the Baltic have financed basic and applied investigations, as well as the building and development of research stations and vessels. After World War II, research in the Baltic Proper was intensified and investigations became much more international. The main goals of such investigations were analysis of the eutrophication and pollution of the Baltic Sea, and development of mitigating strategies (e.g. the HELCOM-Program).

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  • The natural world is a place I escape to: a place that goes about its business regardless of everyday individual human concerns. It is a place of beauty, change, diversity, and endless fa scination. Like many who share these sentiments, I was never content to just be in nature: I had to watch, name, learn, and understand. This book is about understanding how and why the natural world works, thereby to appreciate it more for what it really is. For me, that is one of the things that make life ‘more than just living’....

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  • Large lakes are important because of their size and ecological distinctiveness, as well as their economic and cultural value. Optimal management of them requires a proper understanding of anthropogenic impacts, both on the lake ecosystems, as such and on the services they provide for society. The specific structural and functional properties of large lakes, e.g. morphology, hydrography, biogeochemical cycles, and food-web structure, are all directly related to their size.

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  • According to a recent view of culture as a dynamic process (Miller 1995; Shaw and Clarke 1998), cultural differences often cause differences in consumer behavior within and across national borders. Referring to the identification of consumer segments across countries, macro-level geographic, political, economic, and cultural data have been typically used (e.g., Helsen et al. 1993; Kale 1995). In fact, to identify market segments, national borders and the study of culture are appropriate as segmentation criteria when consumer behavior is "culture bound" (e.g.

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  • Environmentalists are often regarded as people wanting to stop one thing or another, and there are surely lots of things that ought to be stopped. The essays in this book, however, have to do with beginnings. How, for example, do we advance a long-delayed solar revolution? Or begin one in forest management? Or materials use? How do we reimagine and remake the human presence on earth in ways that work over the long haul? Such questions are the heart of what theologian Thomas Berry (1999) calls “the Great Work” of our age....

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  • Environmentalists are often regarded as people wanting to stop one thing or another, and there are surely lots of things that ought to be stopped. The essays in this book, however, have to do with beginnings. How, for example, do we advance a long-delayed solar revolution? Or begin one in forest management? Or materials use? How do we reimagine and remake the human presence on earth in ways that work over the long haul? Such questions are the heart of what theologian Thomas Berry (1999) calls “the Great Work” of our age....

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  • Justice is no mere abstraction. Finding justice and doing justice is a continuous human task. It is the activity which in any society gives politics and the law their purpose. The activity has both a material and a discursive dimension. It has to do with what we are, what we do and what we say. What we are and do is materially real. How we relate to others is discursively real, a matter of communicated explanations via words. The struggle for justice is about how we explain the basis of a good and proper relationship between ourselves and others.

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