Xem 1-13 trên 13 kết quả Preschool child
  • Previous studies have found that adverse effects of maternal employment on child obesity are limited to mothers with higher education and earnings. Explanations for this have centered on differences between the childhood nutritional and exercise environments provided by non-parental caregivers versus by the mothers.

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  • In all of history, no children have had more money of their own, more pressure to spend it, and less guidance in how to do it than the kids of America at the dawn of the 21st century. “Today, more than ever, children must learn about money, for it is both a source of confusion and an indispensable tool they must learn to use.” Those words made a lot of sense back in 1950, in a Kiplinger’s magazine article entitled “Will Your Child Know the Value of a Dollar?” And they're even more true today....

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  • How does a child make sense of her world? Every day, children are exposed to a plethora of stimulation, only little of which has apparent structure. Take visual stimulation, for example: With every motion of the eyes, the head, or the body, the retinal image changes – at least to some extent.

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  • In all of history, no children have had more money of their own, more pressure to spend it, and less guidance in how to do it than the kids of America at the dawn of the 21st century. “Today, more than ever, children must learn about money, for it is both a source of confusion and an indispensable tool they must learn to use.” Those words made a lot of sense back in 1950, in a Kiplinger’s magazine article entitled “Will Your Child Know the Value of a Dollar?” And they're even more true today....

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  • There have been multiple studies of programs focused on positive youth outcomes in general and on reproductive health behaviors in particular. Many programs show promising results, although there have been few rigorous experimental replication studies. See the “what works” table at the end of the chapter for details on specific programs.

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  • I was very pleased when my younger colleagues and Monty Duggal accepted my offer to join me in editing this third edition. Our book has now sold four and a half thousand copies since its launch in 1997 and it is essential that we maintain a contemporary outlook and publish changes in techniques and philosophies as soon as they have an evidence base. Since 2001 and the second edition, there have been a significant number of changes of authorship, as well as a change of chapters for some existing authors. Gerry Winter died in December 2002.

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  • Achieving an adjustment range of 347 to 525mm is not feasible with normal gas strut mechanisms, since the starting dimension of 347mm requires a gas strut of relatively short stroke (100mm), because larger strokes would result in excessive collapsed heights. Gas struts with strokes of 120mm were most common in the chairs evaluated for the government contract, with starting heights averaging 413mm. However, it is reasonable for chair manufacturers to supply two height ranges which would together cover the range determined by anthropometric data.

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  • Vertical integration. Although the delivery of health care is concentrated in the vertically integrated medical care sector (organized around primary, secondary, and tertiary care), many other essential child health service programs are located in the public and population health sectors (Women, Infants, and Children, or WIC; Head Start; and Early Head Start).

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  • The ECE industry is a complicated system that is difficult to quantify because a large portion of it is unregulated. Much of what we know about the ECE industry in California—and nationally—is limited to the “formal” part of the industry, which consists of licensed child care centers and/or preschools, and licensed FCC. FCC is defined as non-parental paid care that is provided in the home of the caregiver (Morrissey & Banghart 2007). In California, FCC homes are licensed as small or large, and are allowed to care for up to 8 children or 14 children respectively.

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  • California also has a “General Child Care” program, in which the state contracts directly with licensed centers or networks of FCC homes to provide ECE. This program was established in the 1960s through Title 5, and sets standards for higher staff qualifications than is required under regular licensing. Payment is set at a standard statewide reimbursement rate. Funding for this program was $797 million with an enrollment of 86,169 in 2010–2011 (Ehlers 2011). There are 1,358 General Child Care centers/providers in the state (CCCRRN 2009).

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  • The data described above allow us to calculate the number of years of a given student’s early childhood in which television sig- nals were available. In order to make the magnitudes we measure in the analysis below more easily interpretable, we will also use data on the rate at which television ownership actually diffused among households in each county. We will use the term televi- sion exposure to refer to the expected number of years a child’s household owned a television during the child’s preschool years.

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  • . ^ S J ^ s I was walking between examination rooms recently, I wished that I could introduce the family in exam room A to the family in exam room B. The children in both rooms had foodrelated "issues"—one was a picky eater and the other was what I dub a "dessert monster." Both children had a couple of rather desperate parents. I knew that if the two families could meet, they would be greatly reassured to know they were not alone.

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  • This chapter describe the normal vital signs and body system characteristics of the newborn, neonate, infant, toddler, preschooler, school‐ age child, adolescent, young adult, middle‐age adult, and older adult; identify key psychosocial features of the infant, toddler, preschooler, school‐age child, adolescent, young adult, middle‐age adult, and older adult; explain the effect of parenting styles, sibling rivalry, peer relationships, and other factors on a child’s psychosocial development.

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