Roman literature

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  • Michael von Albrecht's "A History of Roman Literature," originally published in German, can rightly be seen as the long awaited counterpart to Albin Lesky's "Geschichte der Griechischen Literatur," In what will probably be the last survey made by a single scholar the whole of Latin literature from Livius Andronicus up to Boethius comes to the fore. 'Literature' is taken here in its broad, antique sense, and therefore also includes e.g. rhetoric, philosophy and history. Special attention has been given to the influence of Latin literature on subsequent centuries down to our own days.

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  • When I first broached the matter of writing his autobiography to John H. Cady, two things had struck me particularly. One was that of all the literature about Arizona there was little that attempted to give a straight, chronological and intimate description of events that occurred during the early life of the Territory, and, second, that of all the men I knew, Cady was best fitted, by reason of his extraordinary experiences, remarkable memory for names and dates, and seniority in pioneership, to supply the work that I felt lacking.

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  • In the spring of 1906, the Collège de France invited me to deliver, during November of that year, a course of lectures on Roman history. I accepted, giving a résumé, in eight lectures, of the history of the government of Augustus from the end of the civil wars to his death; that is, a résumé of the matter contained in the fourth and fifth volumes of the English edition of my work, _The Greatness and Decline of Rome_. Following these lectures came a request from M.

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  • The Roman Villa Borg unites both the excavation of one of the largest villa rustica in the Saar Mosel area and the complete reconstruction of the manorial area (Pars Urbana) of such a facility. As far as possible, this reconstruction is based on local findings or on excavation findings of similar facilities of the region (e.g. Echternach in Luxemburg). If necessary, either antique literature (e.g. Vitruv) or modern literature (e.g. for the reconstruction of the wall paintings) was consulted.

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  • Though there is no period at which the ancients do not seem to have believed in a future life, continual confusion prevails when they come to picture the existence led by man in the other world, as we see from the sixth book of the _Æneid_. Combined with the elaborate mythology of Greece, we are confronted with the primitive belief of Italy, and doubtless of Greece too--a belief supported by all the religious rites in connection with the dead--that the spirits of the departed lived on in the tomb with the body.

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  • In the late 1970s a new academic discipline was born: Translation Studies. We could not read literature in translation, it was argued, without asking ourselves if linguistics and cultural phenomena really were ‘translatable’ and exploring in some depth the concept of ‘equivalence’. When Susan Bassnett’s Translation Studies appeared in the New Accents series, it quickly became the one introduction every student and interested reader had to own.

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  • Romans held Greek civilization in high regard and, like us, considered fifth-century-BC Greece to be the region’s golden age, a time characterized by refined artistic and cultural production, scholarship, and military strength. During his reign five hundred years later, Augustus sought to align his rule with this era and promote a rebirth of the golden age of Greece in Rome. Augustus’s interest in Greek art and culture strengthened Roman reverence for classical Greek art, philosophy, and intellectual life.

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  • The Importance of Athens in Greek History.--To three ancient nations the men of the twentieth century owe an incalculable debt. To the Jews we owe most of our notions of religion; to the Romans we owe traditions and examples in law, administration, and the general management of human affairs which still keep their influence and value; and finally, to the Greeks we owe nearly all our ideas as to the fundamentals of art, literature, and philosophy, in fact, of almost the whole of our intellectual life.

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