Xem 1-17 trên 17 kết quả School violence
  • This tool kit is designed for schools that want to help students recover from traumatic experiences such as natural disasters, exposure to violence, abuse or assault, terrorist incidents, and war and refugee experiences. It focuses on long-term recovery, as opposed to immediate disaster response

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  • This edition of theHandbook of Counseling Psychologylik,e all three prior editions, has three primary objectives: (1) to provide a scholarly review of important areas of counseling psychology inquiry, (2) to elaborate directions for future research, and (3) to draw specific suggestions for practice that derive from the scholarly literature in counseling psychology and related disciplines.

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  • School-related gender-based violence remains an obstacle to girls’ education. Efforts to address school safety are needed at all levels, including teacher training, community intervention and ministerial policy and practice. Ministries of Education can send a clear message that gender- based school violence will not be tolerated by firmly and quickly prosecuting perpetra- tors. Teacher training should include strong messages about professional and ethical conduct.

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  • Latina/os are now the largest and fastest growing minority group in the United States, representing approximately 33 million in the year 2000, and two thirds of them are Chicana/os. However, there are major differences among Latino subgroups in terms of their cultural characteristics, immigration experiences, history, socioeconomic levels, and other important factors. It is no longer appropriate to negate these differences or to assume that all Latinos share similar psychological issues (McNeill et al., 2001).

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  • Education is an important tool in the fight against HIV/AIDS. And while most schools are welcoming to children, some schools fail to provide the necessary protection for children to flourish and, in fact, may expose young people – especially girls – to violence. School cultures can contribute to gender violence. Often, gender stereotypes and inequities abound in the classroom, where different behaviours and roles are expected from girls and boys. Gender-based school violence takes many forms.

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  • Under VAWA, a “protection order” is defined as “. . . any injunction, restraining order, or any other order issued by a civil or criminal court for the purpose of preventing violent or threatening acts or harassment against, sexual violence, or contact or communication with or physical proximity to, another person . . . .” This expansive definition also includes “any support, child custody or visitation provisions, orders, remedies or relief issued as part of any protection order, restraining order or injunction.” 18 U.S.C. § 2266(5)....

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  • The global political community has also made progress, especially in addressing the gravity of sexual violence in armed conflict. The United Nations Security Council Resolu- tions 1325, 1820, 1888 and 1889 on Women, Peace and Security affirm the unique needs, perspectives and contributions of women and girls in conflict settings.

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  • In recent years, the Court invalidated two con- gressional statutes that attempted to regulate non- economic activities. In United States v. Lopez (1995), it struck down the Gun-Free School Zones Act, which attempted to reach the activity of possessing a gun within a thousand feet of a school. In United States v. Morrison (2000), it invalidated part of the Violence Against Women Act, which regulated gen- der-motivated violence.

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  • We wish to stress three important caveats. First, our iden- tification strategy only allows us to speak to the effects of early childhood exposure. The effects of viewing by school-age children are also clearly important for policy, and our results do not directly inform that debate. Second, we can only identify long-run effects.

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  • Children’s health behaviors and risk-taking (sexual activity, poor nutrition, physical inactivity, substance use, violence, etc.) are determined by a variety of factors. Governments, foundations, communities, schools, and adults all play important roles in supporting healthy behaviors among children. Implementing evidence-based programs and policies increases the impact of financial and resource investments and can improve child health outcomes. Since 2002, there have been some improvements worth noting.

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  • Children’s social and emotional wellbeing is important in its own right but also because it affects their physical health (both as a child and as an adult) and can determine how well they do at school. Good social, emotional and psychological health helps protect children against emotional and behavioural problems, violence and crime, teenage pregnancy and the misuse of drugs and alcohol (‘Systematic review of the effectiveness of interventions to promote mental wellbeing in children in primary education’ Adi et al. 2007). ...

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  • Ensuring that children are healthy and able to learn is an essential part of an effective education system. As many studies show, education and health are inseparable. A child’s nutritional status affects cognitive performance and test scores; illness from parasitic infection results in absence from school, leading to school failure and dropping out (Vince Whitman et al., 2001). Structures and conditions of the learning environment are as important to address as individual factors. Water and sanitation conditions at school can affect girls’ attendance.

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  • Third, the nature of gender inequalities varies from region to region and country to country. For example, in most middle-income countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, gender disparities in primary school enrollments are very small and, in some cases, favor girls over boys. However, issues such as ownership of land by poor women, gender inequalities in labor markets, returns to education, and gender violence remain important. In the transition countries of Eastern Europe, gender issues arise largely from the patterns associ- ated with the transition.

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  • Context of childhood sexual violence: The three most common perpetrators of sexual violence experienced by females prior to age 18 were strangers, neighbours, and dating partners. Nearly two-thirds of these females reported that at least one incident of sexual violence involved a perpetrator who was 10 or more years older. About one-half of males 13 to 24 years of age reported that at least one of their incidents of childhood sexual violence was perpetrated by someone older.

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  • The Child, Youth, Family and Social Development (CYFSD) research programme of the HSRC aims to promote human and social development through the production of high quality applied research that addresses challenges arising from social inequality, poverty, violence, HIV/AIDS and other causes of ill-health and suffering, and loss of human potential. We research aspects of the life course, from infancy to old age, with an emphasis on understanding how contexts, policies and politics shape and distribute life chances.

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  • Exposure to community and interpersonal violence is a public health crisis that adversely affects many children in American communities. After witnessing or experiencing trauma, many children experience symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and depression, behavioral problems, substance abuse, and poor school

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  • As the NCPCR policy document states, “[...] civil unrest exposes children to multiple deprivations. Children are killed, hurt and maimed as a direct result of violence. Access to food, water, sanitation, health care and schooling deteriorates during unrest. Political insecurity pushes children into situations that can circumscribe the remainder of their lives. It disrupts families and social networks that support children’s physical, emotional and social development. The NCPCR has encountered children who are displaced and forced to drop out of school as a result.

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