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Freaky Froggie

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  1. Brenda Hoddinott N-05 INTERMEDIATE: 3D CARTOONS In this lesson, you sketch Freaky’s proportions, outline him with nice neat lines, and then add shading with blended hatching. This project is divided into the following five parts: SKETCHING BASIC PROPORTIONS: In this section, your goal is to sketch Freaky on your drawing paper proportionately correct, by drawing various lines and shapes. OUTLINING FREAKY’S FACIAL FEATURES: In this section you outline Freaky’s face, including his eyes, mouth, and teeth. As you know, the eyes of an actual frog differ significantly from this cartoon drawing. OUTLINING FROG LEGS AND FEET: At first glance, the lower half of Freaky’s body seems rather complex; however, the process becomes quite simple when you draw only one section at a time. In this part, you sketch the proportions of his feet, webbed toes and legs. COMPLETING THE LINE DRAWING: In this section you first erase unnecessary sketch lines, and then redraw Freaky, including his body, legs, feet, eyes, mouth, warts, and teeth. ADDING A SMOOTH, SHINY TEXTURE: In this section you blend the various values of the shading so as to make Freaky’s texture smoother. Final details are added by outlining the contours with a fine tip marker or a freshly sharpened pencil. For this project you need good quality white drawing paper, different grades of graphite pencils (such as 2H, HB, 2B, 4B, and 6B), kneaded and vinyl erasers, blending tools such as Q-tips and facial tissues, and a pencil sharpener. 21 PAGES – 40 ILLUSTRATIONS This project is recommended for artists from age 12 to adult, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada – 2004 (Revised 2006)
  2. -2- SKETCHING BASIC PROPORTIONS There’s a method to my madness in having you draw cartoons of animals. First of all, your brain won’t get stuck telling you something is anatomically wrong, because cartoons are not supposed to look real! Secondly, cartoons are fun to draw! In this section, your goal is to sketch Freaky on your drawing paper proportionately correct, by drawing various lines and shapes. Proportion is the relationship in size of one component of a drawing to another or others. As you draw, compare your drawing to mine and double check the proportions. Keep your lines very light. Most of them need to be erased before you finish. 1) Draw a square as your drawing format. Suggested sizes range from 5 by 5 to 12 by 12 inches. 2) Measure and mark the halfway points of the top and bottom sides of the square. 3) Connect the center points of the top and bottom of the square, with a vertical line that divides the square into two identical rectangles. This vertical line is a line of symmetry, which will help you draw both sides of the frog the same size and shape; however each side will be a mirror image of the other). 4) In the rectangle on the left side of the square, draw half a heart-shape. ILLUSTRATION 05-01 ILLUSTRATION 05-02 Freaky Froggy actually looks like he is part frog and part toad. However, did you know that many scientists consider toads to be frogs! Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  3. -3- ILLUSTRATION 05-03 5) Draw the other half of the heart in the rectangle on the right. Use your line of symmetry to help you judge the distances. If you want to be really precise, you can always measure with a ruler from the line of symmetry outward on both sides. This heart identifies the location of Freaky’s face and body. Did you know that ancient ancestors of today’s frogs existed on earth more than 190 million years ago? ILLUSTRATION 05-04 6) Add an upside down U-shape below the heart shape. Again use your line of symmetry to help you sketch both sides the same size and shape. The U-shape marks the inner bottom sections of his feet. Did you know that some frogs can use their powerful legs to jump up to twenty times the length of their bodies? Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  4. -4- ILLUSTRATION 05-05 7) Draw two more curved lines below the heart- shape but above the U- shape. These lines mark the locations of the upper section of his feet. Did you know that some really large frogs can gulp down a whole mouse in one bite? However, the menus of most frogs include such scrumptious delicacies as snails, tiny fish, worms, and spiders. OUTLINING FREAKY’S FACIAL FEATURES In this section you outline Freaky’s face, including his eyes, mouth, and teeth. As you know, the eyes of an actual frog differ significantly from this cartoon drawing. ILLUSTRATION 05-06 Note of the names of the following parts of Freaky’s eyes: 1. The upper eyelid is a movable fold of skin that opens and closes to protect the eyeball. 2. A highlight is the brightest area where light bounces off the surface of the eye. 3. The pupil of an eye is the dark circular shape within the iris. 4. The iris is the colored circular section of the eyeball surrounding the pupil. 5. The white of the eye (the visible section of the eyeball) is light, but not really white. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  5. -5- ILLUSTRATION 05-07 8) Draw two ovals as the outlines of his eyes. The ovals overlap the upper section of the body (the heart shape). ILLUSTRATION 05-08 9) Sketch a slightly curved horizontal line as his mouth. 10) Add a short curved line on each end of his mouth to complete his smile. ILLUSTRATION 05-09 11) Sketch a couple of squares as his teeth. Did you know that, Unlike Freaky, most frogs do not have teeth – and none have teeth like this? Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  6. -6- ILLUSTRATION 05-10 12) Connect the outside edges of his teeth to the upper section of the opening of the mouth. 13) Add a short horizontal line below his mouth to mark the lower lip. ILLUSTRATION 05-11 14) Add slightly curved lines to mark the lower edge of his upper eyelids. 15) Sketch a partial circle in each eye as the irises. The irises touch the line marking the top of his body. ILLUSTRATION 05-12 16) Extend the lines marking the lower and outside edges of each eyelid. These lines make the eyelids look wider than the eyes. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  7. -7- Did you know that frog’s legs are a popular delicacy for people in many countries of the world, especially the Southern United States and Europe? Supposedly, they taste a lot like chicken! ILLUSTRATION 05-13 17) Add a small circular shape in the upper right of each iris. 18) Sketch partial circles inside each iris as the pupils. ILLUSTRATION 05-14 19) Check over the upper section of your sketch, and fix any areas you aren’t happy with. Did you know that frogs swallow their food whole. Even those frogs that have teeth don’t use them to chew (or smile)! Rather, their teeth are used to grab and hold on to their dinner. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  8. -8- OUTLINING FROG LEGS AND FEET At first glance, the lower half of Freaky’s body seems rather complex; however, the process becomes quite simple when you draw only one section at a time. In this part, you sketch the proportions of his feet, webbed toes and legs. 20) Draw an upside down U-shape, at an outward angle, above each foot. ILLUSTRATION 05-15 These lines identify the shape of the frog’s big powerful back legs. Watch closely the positions of the outlines of his legs in relation to the rest of the lines and spaces in the drawing. ILLUSTRATION 05-16 21) Add smaller upside- down U- shapes, as the frog’s front legs. Observe that the two front legs are drawn completel y inside the heart- shape. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  9. -9- ILLUSTRATION 05-17 22) Extend the front legs toward the line of symmetry. 23) Add curved lines to the bottoms of the feet to mark the webs between the toes (as in Illustration 05-18). ILLUSTRATION 05-18 Did you know that frogs often lead a double life, on land and in water? When big hungry land predators come looking for some fresh frog legs for dinner, frogs can jump into the water and swim away. If the frog’s menu of pond delicacies becomes boring, they can hop onto shore and look for more appetizing cuisines. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  10. - 10 - COMPLETING THE LINE DRAWING In this section you first erase unnecessary sketch lines, and then redraw Freaky, including his body, legs, feet, eyes, mouth, warts, and teeth. Pay close attention to the lengths, angles, and curves of the various lines. Remember; don’t press too hard with your pencils. These areas become impossible to touch up, and also leave dents in your paper, spoiling the overall appearance of your drawing. 24) Erase all sketch lines that are no longer needed. Refer to the before and after drawings below, and erase the following: Line of symmetry Lines inside the outer edges of his eyelids Lines inside the whites of his eyes (part of the original heart-shape) Lines inside the inner sections of his back legs (part of the original heart-shape) Lines inside the lower sections of his back legs Lines inside his tiny front legs Line under his eyes in the center (V-shape) 25) Use your kneaded eraser to lighten all remaining sketch lines until they are so faint that you can barely see them. ILLUSTRATION 05-19 ILLUSTRATION 05-20 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  11. - 11 - 26) Redraw his eyes with crisp neat lines (use a 2B pencil). Keep your pencil point sharp as you work. 27) Draw over his mouth and teeth with dark thin lines. ILLUSTRATION 05-21 ILLUSTRATION 05-22 ILLUSTRATION 05-23 28) Add circles (warts) of various sizes on his body and legs. Don’t worry about drawing his warts the same size, or in the same places, as mine. However, the warts become much more interesting when their sizes vary from large to tiny. Don’t miss the three that are only half circles! Many people think that all frogs have smooth, moist skin, and that all toads have dry, warty skin. However, did you know that some frogs have warty skin, and some toads have slimy skin? Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  12. - 12 - ILLUSTRATION 05-24 29) Outline both sides of his body. His body is also his face in this cartoon! Did you know that because frogs’ big bulging eyes are on top of their heads, they can see in many different directions at once? They also have excellent eyesight, which allows them to distinguish various colors and see in dim light! No wonder it’s so hard to sneak up on a frog! ILLUSTRATION 05-25 30) Outline his legs and feet with thin dark lines. Frogs can easily catch fast moving insects. They hide quietly under the surface of the water for a long time, with only their eyes and nose visible, patiently waiting for their unsuspecting lunch to swim, float or fly by. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  13. - 13 - ILLUSTRATION 05-26 31) Complete your line drawing by adding his front legs. Freaky’s front legs look more like arms and his front feet look more like hands! Tiny fish-like creatures with gills and a long tail, called tadpoles, hatch from frog eggs. Tadpoles have gluttonous appetites, and will eat almost anything, including algae and other underwater vegetation. Older tadpoles may dine on tiny insects, and sometimes even other smaller tadpoles. SHADING VALUES WITH HATCHING Before you can use blending to make Freaky’s skin look shiny, you need to carefully add shading. Shading refers to the various shades of gray (values) in a drawing that make drawings look three-dimensional. Shading is also the process of adding values to a drawing so as to create the illusion of form and/or three-dimensional space. Depending on the shading effects you want, you can make the individual lines in hatching sets far apart or close together. In this section, you add a full range of values to Freaky with hatching graduations. Hatching is a series of lines (called a set) drawn closely together to give the illusion of values. Keep the following in mind: Draw some hatching lines close together and others farther apart. Press very lightly with your pencil for light lines and apply more pressure to achieve darker lines. Keep a pencil sharpener (and sandpaper block if you have one) handy so you can easily keep your pencil points nice and sharp. Always place a piece of clean paper under your hand as you draw to protect your drawing from accidental smudges. Take your time and watch closely the various directions in which the hatching lines curve. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  14. - 14 - Light affects the placement and value of every section of shading in a drawing. A full range of values from light to dark gives contrast between the light and the shadow areas. As you can tell by the locations of the highlights in his eyes, the light source in this cartoon is from the right. Therefore, the values need to be lighter on the right than on the left. Light source The direction from which a dominant light originates. The placement of this light source affects every aspect of a drawing. 32) With an HB pencil add light shading to the eyes, body legs, and feet of the frog. ILLUSTRATION 05-27 The hatching lines on the eyelids are slightly curved and follow the contour of the outlines. The hatching lines of the iris all seem to converge toward the center of the pupil. The shading is darker on the right side of the iris than on the left. The hatching lines are mostly curved and follow the contours of the various sections of his body, legs and feet. The shading on his webbed feet is very light along his three toes. Note the thin dark shadow to the left of each Unlike this cartoon of a toe, which helps make the toes frog, real frogs have look three-dimensional.. four toes on each front leg and five on each back leg. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  15. - 15 - ILLUSTRATION 05-28 33) Use HB and 2B pencils to add dark shading on the side of the eyelids that is in shadow. The shading on the right and in the center is lighter. 34) Use a 4B to fill in the tiny sections of the eyelids on the lower outsides. ILLUSTRATION 05-29 35) With an HB pencil add the shadows to the iris and the whites of the eyes, under the eyelids. 36) Fill in each pupil with a 6B pencil. 37) Add darker shading to the sections of the irises, close to the highlights. ILLUSTRATION 05-30 38) Add darker shading to the shadows to the left of, in between, and underneath the eyes (Use a 2B or 4B). Make sure you have left a section of reflected light on the lower left of each eye. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  16. - 16 - ILLUSTRATION 05-31 39) Add shading to the mouth and lips. 40) Shade in the shadow on the teeth created by the cast shadow of the upper lip. 41) Add light shading to the left side of each tooth (use a 2H). ILLUSTRATION 05-32 42) Draw eyelashes on the outside edge of each eyelid. 43) Add shading to the shadow sections of his body, face, legs and feet. Use 2B for the medium values and 4B for the dark. Remember, the light source is from the right, so the shading is darker on the left. Frogs eat humungous quantities of insects. Did you know that even a small frog can devour a hundred mosquitoes a day? Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  17. - 17 - 44) Add dark shading (a cast shadow) on the left of and slightly below each wart. Use a 2B pencil. This cast shadow is darkest close to the edge of the circle. The shading graduates a little lighter the farther away it is (Refer to Illustration 05-33). 45) Outline a tiny circle in the upper right of each wart as the highlight. Refer to Illustration 05-34.This outline should be so light you can barely see it! 46) Add a crescent shape of dark shading to the left of each highlight (use a 2B). ILLUSTRATION 05-33 ILLUSTRATION 05-34 ILLUSTRATION 05-35 ILLUSTRATION 05-36 ILLUSTRATION 05-37 47) Use a 2H pencil to add light shading to the remainder of each wart, except for the highlights (as in Illustration 05-36). Refer to Illustration 05-37 to see Freaky with shading added to all his warts. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  18. - 18 - ADDING A SMOOTH, SHINY TEXTURE If this is your first attempt at blending, take some time to experiment on some scrap paper before you begin this section. Graphite tends to be very difficult to blend properly, especially for beginners. 48) Take your time and patiently blend Freaky’s face, body, legs, feet, and spots. Use a circular motion to blend the lightest values first, such as around the highlights. Continue blending from light to dark values. Work on only one section of Freaky at a time. ILLUSTRATION 05-38 Remember, easy does it! Be careful not to rub the surface of your paper too roughly, or you will damage and possibly ruin your drawing. Keep in mind that many sections of dark shading will not need to be blended. Also, there’s nothing wrong with using blending for some sections of a drawing and not for others. It’s completely a matter of personal preference. 49) Clean the smudged graphite from around the edges of your drawing. You can use your kneaded eraser molded to a point, or the sharp corner edge of a vinyl eraser. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  19. - 19 - 50) Use 2B, 4B, and 6B pencils to add darker shading to the shadow sections and any other sections that are too light. 51) Blend the sections close to and around the dark shadow sections. Gently blend the graduations in each section from the lighter sections toward the darker; but, remember, you may not need to blend the dark shadows. However, if the shading becomes too light in the dark shadowed areas, add more graphite. 52) Erase the messy blended smudges that extend outside the edges of your drawing. 53) Use your kneaded eraser, molded to a point or a wedge, to lighten the highlight sections that have become too dark from the blending. ILLUSTRATION 05-39 When blending NEVER use your fingers! As a matter of fact, try not to ever touch your drawing paper with your fingers or hands in sections you plan to blend. The powder component in graphite works like the fingerprinting powder used by criminal investigative sections of police departments. Your skin can transfer oil to the paper. This oil becomes visible after blending, especially in the lighter values. It’s darn near impossible to create a smooth, even tone with graphite in those areas with finger or hand prints. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  20. - 20 - 54) Redraw any sections of the outline that have become smudged or too light with thin neat lines. Use either a dark pencil or a very fine-tipped black marker. If you use a pencil, keep the point very sharp. ILLUSTRATION 05-40 Did you know that frogs are native to every continent in the world except Antarctica? Find time to go for a walk in a natural frog habitat close to where you live. Take a sketch book, drawing materials, and/or a camera and capture some drawings or photos of frogs. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
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