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International human resource management - Chapter 7

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International human resource management - Chapter 7

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Trong khi các chương trước tập trung vào việc quản lý và hỗ trợ các công việc quốc tế, thỏa thuận này chương với những gì có thể được gọi là giai đoạn sau chuyển nhượng. Tái nhập cảnh, tuy nhiên, vấn đề đặt ra cho cả người nước ngoài và đa quốc gia, một số trong đó có thể được kết nối với các sự kiện xảy ra trong việc giao quốc tế. Chúng tôi điều trị giai đoạn này như một phần của sự phân công quốc tế. Chúng tôi kiểm tra:...

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Nội dung Text: International human resource management - Chapter 7

  1. Chapter 7 Re-entry and career issues 7/1 Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  2. Chapter objectives Whereas the preceding chapters concentrated on the management and support of international assignments, this chapter deals with what could be called the post-assignment stage. Re-entry, though, raises issues for both the expatriate and the multinational, some of which may be connected to events that occurred during the international assignment. We treat this stage as part of the international assignment. We examine: • the process of re-entry or repatriation • job-related issues (cont.) Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/2 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  3. Chapter objectives (cont.) • social factors, including family factors that affect re-entry and work adjustment • multinational responses to repatriate concerns return on investment (ROI) and knowledge transfer • designing a repatriation programme. Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/3 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  4. Re-entry • Expatriation process also includes repatriation: the activity of bringing the expatriate back to the home country • Re-entry presents new challenges – May experience re-entry shock – Some exit the company Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/4 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  5. Figure 7-1: Expatriation includes repatriation Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/5 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  6. Figure 7-2: The repatriation process Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/6 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  7. Repatriation phases • Preparation - developing plans for the future; gathering information about the new position • Physical relocation Use of relocation consultants and removal • Transition firms • Readjustment - coping with change Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/7 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  8. Individual reactions: job-related • Career anxiety – No post-assignment guarantee of employment – Loss of visibility and isolation – Changes in the home workplace • Work adjustment – The employment relationship and career expectation – Re-entry position – Devaluing of international experience • Coping with new role demands • Loss of status and pay Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/8 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  9. Figure 7-3: The repatriate’s role Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/9 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  10. UK repatriate study • Survey of 124 recently repatriated employees • Data analysis indicated five predictors for repatriate maladjustment (in ranked order): – Length of time abroad – Unrealistic expectations – Downward job mobility – Reduced work status – Negative perceptions of employer’s support N. Forster (1994) The Forgotten Employees? The Experience of Expatriate Staff Returning to the UK, International Journal of Human Resource Management, 5 (2): 408 Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/10 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  11. Figure 7-4: The readjustment challenge Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/11 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  12. Individual reactions: social factors • International experience can distance the repatriate (and family) socially and psychologically (eg. Kingpin syndrome) • Each family member undergoing readjustment • Re-establishing social networks can be difficult • Effect on partner’s career Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/12 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  13. Multinational responses • Staff availability – How repatriation is handled is critical • Return on investment (ROI) – Defining ROI in terms of expatriation – Gains accruing through repatriated staff • Knowledge transfer – A one-way activity? – Tacit and person-bound? Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/13 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  14. Difficulties in measuring ROI • Receiving feedback from the business unit concerned • Tracking international assignments in a systematic way • No formal planning • Lack of objective measures • Too many decisions made without cost considerations From responses to GMAC-GRS 2002 survey Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/14 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  15. Table 7-1: Topics covered by a repatriation program Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/15 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  16. The use of mentors • Aims to alleviate the ‘out-of-sight, ‘out-of- mind’ feeling by keeping expatriate informed • Mentor should ensure that the expatriate is not forgotten when important decisions are made re positions and promotions • Effective mentoring needs managing Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/16 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  17. Chapter summary This chapter has been concerned with the repatriation process. We have covered: • The repatriation process. One may conclude that in re-entry, the broader socio-cultural context of the home country takes a backstage position – unlike in the expatriation adjustment phase, where the foreign culture can be overwhelming. Cultural novelty has been found to affect adjustment and, for the majority of repatriates, coming home to the familiar culture may assist in readjustment. Indeed, given the more profound effect that job- related factors appear to have, re-entry shock is perhaps a more accurate term to describe the readjustment process experienced upon repatriation. (cont.) Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/17 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  18. Chapter summary (cont.) • Job-related issues centered on career issues upon re-entry. Factors that affected career anxiety were no post-assignment guarantee of employment, fear that the period overseas had caused a loss of visibility, changes in the home workplace that affect re-entry positions and the employment relationship. The re-entry position was an important indicator of future career progression and the value placed on international experience. Coping with new role demands was another factor in readjustment, along with loss of status and pay. (cont.) Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/18 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  19. Chapter summary (cont.) • Social factors explored were loss of social standing – the kingpin syndrome – and the accompanying loss of the expatriate lifestyle. Family readjustment was also important. A specific aspect was the effect of the international assignment upon the spouse/partner’s career, such as being re-employed and having international experience recognized. (cont.) Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/19 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
  20. Chapter summary (cont.) • Multinational responses to repatriates’ concerns focused on re- entry procedures. We looked at how repatriation affected staff availability, whether companies were measuring and obtaining a return on investment through international assignments and the contribution of repatriates to knowledge transfer. • Designing effective repatriation programs, including the use of mentors. (cont.) Use with International Human Resource Management ISBN 1-84480013-X 7/20 Published by Thomson Learning © Peter Dowling and Denice Welch
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