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Playing With Pencils

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Playing With Pencils

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Tài liệu tham khảo bằng tiếng Anh về nghệ thiật hội họa - Playing With Pencils

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  1. Brenda Hoddinott F-03 BEGINNER: HATCHING Many artists struggle unnecessarily for years to create a full range of values with only one or two pencils, totally unaware of how pencils themselves can create different values. In this lesson, you create the illusion of depth in a mountain range, by using various grades of pencils. You will also utilize two components of perspective, overlapping and atmospheric perspective. This lesson is divided into the following three parts: INTRODUCTION: When you use a combination of several H and B pencils you can easily create a full range of values in your drawings. SKETCHING ELEVEN MOUNTAINS: You sketch eleven overlapping mountains, beginning with the one that appears closest, and working back toward the distant mountain and the sky. PENCILS BUILD A MOUNTAIN RANGE: You use 12 different grades of pencils to add shading to each section of the sky and mountain range to render the illusion of depth as created by atmospheric perspective. Suggested supplies include white drawing paper, kneaded and vinyl erasers, a pencil sharpener, and 5H, 4H, 3H, 2H, HB, 2B, 3B, 4B, 5B, 6B, 7B and 8B pencils. This project is recommended for artists and aspiring artists of all ages, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. 14 PAGES – 27 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada, 2005 (Revised 2006)
  2. 2 INTRODUCTION Many artists labor unnecessarily for years to create a full range of values with only one or two pencils, totally unaware of how pencils themselves can create different values. Generally speaking, H pencils work beautifully for light and middle values, and B pencils are best for middle and dark values. When you use a combination of several H and B pencils you can easily create a full range of values in your drawings. Refer to the following two illustrations to get an idea of the goal of this lesson. Various grades of pencils help create the illusion of depth in the mountain range. ILLUSTRATION 03-01 First of all, you will sketch a range of eleven mountains. You will then add shading to each mountain with a different grade of pencil. You need 5H, 4H, 3H, 2H, HB, 2B, 3B, 4B, 5B, 6B, 7B and 8B pencils. 2H is the lightest (hardest), and the 8B is the darkest (softest). ILLUSTRATION 03-02 In addition to using various grades of pencils, you will employ two components of perspective, overlapping and atmospheric perspective. Overlapping is a technique that gives the illusion of depth in a drawing, and refers to the position of subjects in a composition, when one visually appears to be in front of another (or others). Atmospheric perspective (sometimes called aerial perspective) refers to the visual depth created by various particles in the atmosphere. The farther an object recedes into the distance, the lighter in value it seems to become, and its edges and forms appear more blurred. To learn more about the fundamentals of perspective, refer to lesson E-01 Basic Perspective for Beginners. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  3. 3 SKETCHING ELEVEN MOUNTAINS In this section, you sketch eleven overlapping mountains beginning with the one that is closest and working back toward the distant mountain and the sky. When sketching overlapping objects, I generally find it easier to draw those in the foreground first. 1. Outline a horizontal rectangle, similar in shape to mine, as your drawing space. A drawing space (also called the drawing surface or drawing format) is the area in which you render a drawing within a specific perimeter. A horizontal rectangle is often referred to as a landscape format. You can either turn your drawing paper horizontally, or you can use a ruler to draw a rectangle as your drawing space. My drawing space is 3 by 5 inches. As you continue through this section, try to draw the outlines of the mountains in approximately the same locations as in my sketches. ILLUSTRATION 03-03 2. Sketch the outline of a mountain in the lower left corner of the drawing space. Use a 2H pencil and press very lightly so you don’t indent the paper. ILLUSTRATION 03-04 3. Outline a second mountain behind the first. While it’s important to draw your mountains in approximately the same locations as mine, there’s no need to make their shapes exactly like mine. Feel free to draw them more rounded or jagged. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  4. 4 ILLUSTRATION 03-05 4. Sketch the remaining nine mountains. Follow along with the following nine sketches (Illustrations 03-05 to 13). ILLUSTRATION 03-06 ILLUSTRATION 03-07 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  5. 5 ILLUSTRATION 03-08 ILLUSTRATION 03-09 ILLUSTRATION 03-10 ILLUSTRATION 03-06 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  6. 6 ILLUSTRATION 03-11 ILLUSTRATION 03-12 ILLUSTRATION 03-13 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  7. 7 ILLUSTRATION 03-14 5. Neatly outline each mountain with the pencil that will be used for its shading. For example, the first one you drew in the lower left of the drawing space needs to be outlined with an 8B pencil, the one directly behind it with a 7B, and so on. PENCILS BUILD A MOUNTAIN RANGE Artists have been drawing with graphite for centuries and even today it remains the most popular drawing medium. It has withstood the test of time for permanence, and lends itself beautifully to all styles of drawing. In this section, you add shading to each section of the mountain range to render the illusion of depth as a result of various particles in the atmosphere. Shading is the process of adding values to a drawing so as to create the illusion of form and/or three-dimensional spaces. Feel free to use whatever style of shading you prefer, such as hatching or squirkling (I’ve used hatching). ILLUSTRATION 03-15 6. Use an 8B pencil to add a very dark value to the closest mountain, in the lower left corner. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  8. 8 7. Continue shading each mountain in sequence from the foreground to distant space. Use the pencils indicated in Illustration 03-14. ILLUSTRATION 03-16 Use a 7B for this mountain ILLUSTRATION 03-17 Use a 6B for this mountain Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  9. 9 Each mountain needs to be shaded a little lighter than the last. Hence, you may need to occasionally go back over some mountains and adjust their values a little. To make a mountain darker you need to press a little harder with your pencil, and to make the value lighter, you ease off on the pressure used. If a mountain seems way too dark, you can pat it with your kneaded eraser and redo the shading until you are happy with the results. ILLUSTRATION 03-18 Use a 5B for this mountain ILLUSTRATION 03-19 Use a 4B for this mountain Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  10. 10 ILLUSTRATION 03-20 Use a 3B for this mountain ILLUSTRATION 03-13 ILLUSTRATION 03-21 Use a 2B for this mountain Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  11. 11 ILLUSTRATION 03-22 Use a HB for this mountain ILLUSTRATION 03-23 Use a 2H for this mountain Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  12. 12 ILLUSTRATION 03-24 Use a 3H for this mountain ILLUSTRATION 03-25 Use a 4H for this mountain Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  13. 13 ILLUSTRATION 03-26 Use a 5H to add shading to the sky As a final touch, (if you want your drawing to look really neat), you can outline the edges of each mountain again with freshly sharpened pencils (as you did in step 6). ILLUSTRATION 03-27 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  14. 14 BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, conté crayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning, and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing and painting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites. Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach to curriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world. LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS BY BRENDA HODDINOTT Drawing for Dummies (2003): Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People (2004): Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
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