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Squirkling Values

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Squirkling Values

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  1. SQUIRKLING VALUES Brenda Hoddinott D-01 BEGINNER: SQUIRKLING What do you get when you cross squiggles with circles? You get Squirkles! Squirkling is a method of shading incorporating randomly drawn curved lines to create textured values. I chose this name based on the method of morphing squiggles with circles to create shading. Many of my students, from the past two decades, are very familiar with this word! By varying the density (drawing the lines either far apart or close together) of the lines, you can achieve many different values. Light values with squirkles tend to have noticeable curved lines with lots of white space showing. In darker values, the lines are drawn more closely together, filling in most of the paper with the texture of squirkles. This lesson is divided into the following two parts: DRAWING BASIC SQUIRKLE SETS CREATING SQUIRKLE VALUE SCALES Suggested drawing supplies include HB and 4B pencils, vinyl and kneaded erasers, good quality drawing paper, a pencil sharpener, and a sandpaper block. This lesson is recommended for artists of all ages and abilities, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. 6 PAGES – 10 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada – Revised 2005
  2. 2 DRAWING BASIC SQUIRKLE SETS Squirkling is a method of shading incorporating randomly drawn curved lines to create textured values and graduated value scales. In this section, you use a 2B pencil to draw three squirkle values. Values are the different shades of gray created by varying the density of the shading lines, and/or the pressure used in holding various pencils. In this exercise, the values are rendered by drawing curved and compound curved lines either far apart or close together. Curved lines are created when a straight line curves (or bends). Examples of curved lines include the letters C and U. A curved line can become a circular shape when the ends meet as in the letter O. A compound curve is created when a straight line curves (or bends) in more than one direction. An example of a compound curve is the letter “S”. Squint your eyes and look at the following sets of squirkles. ILLUSTRATION 01-01 The first set (on the far left) has very few lines drawn far apart, creating the illusion of a light value. The second set is darker, and the third set is the darkest. ILLUSTRATION 01-02 1. Draw a set of lines that curve in many different directions. Notice that some individual lines cut across themselves in many places, creating lots of different shapes, an abstract composition, and an overall light value. The old expression “few and far between” works well here. The lines are far apart and few in number. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  3. 3 ILLUSTRATION 01-03 2. Draw a second set of squirkle lines that are closer together than in your first set. Note that there are more lines than in the first set and the lines are closer together. ILLUSTRATION 01-04 3. Draw the darkest set of squirkle lines very closely together. Many more lines make up this third squirkle set, and the lines are much closer together. Very little of the white paper is still showing. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  4. 4 CREATING SQUIRKLE VALUE SCALES In this exercise you vary the density of the lines (as in the previous exercise), and also use various pencils to help render five different values with squirkles. Before you begin, practice drawing squirkles with each of the three pencils and notice their differences. The 2H is the lightest (hardest) and the 4B is the darkest (softest). The 4B is very good for darker values, 2B is great for middle values, and 2H works well for light values. ILLUSTRATION 01-05 1. Using your 2H pencil, draw the first two values beginning with the lightest. More lines are used to create the second value than the first. ILLUSTRATION 01-06 2. With your 2B pencil, draw the next two values. Again, pay attention to the density of the lines so each progressive value is darker than the last. ILLUSTRATION 01-07 3. Use your 4B to draw the darkest value. Keep practicing these values in your sketchbook until you can draw all five different values. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  5. 5 4. Draw another value scale from light to dark, and then try one from dark to light. Refer to these completed value scales to see the five values in sequence. ILLUSTRATION 01-08 ILLUSTRATION 01-09 ILLUSTRATION 01-10 The beauty of squirkles is its ability to produce an infinite range of values and a variety of textures. Texture is the surface detail of an object, as defined in a drawing with various shading techniques. The senses of touch and sight help identify the surface texture of drawing subject. Examine the wool on this cartoon sheep and identify a light, medium and dark value. Note how the different values make the sheep’s body look three-dimensional. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  6. 6 BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, conté crayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning, and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing and painting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites. Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach to curriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world. LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS BY BRENDA HODDINOTT Drawing for Dummies (2003): Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People (2004): Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
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