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Triumphant Tree

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Triumphant Tree

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  1. TRIUMPHANT Brenda Hoddinott D-09 BEGINNER: SQUIRKLING With help from a simple grid, you sketch the outline of a tree and use squirkles to shade in the texture of the branches and trunk. Recommended for artists from age 09 to adult, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators With help from a simple grid, you sketch the outline of a tree and use squirkles to shade in the texture of the branches and trunk. This lesson is divided into three parts: SETTING UP YOUR DRAWING: You first choose and set up your drawing format with a simple grid, and then sketch the outline of the tree’s branches and the rocky cliff. OUTLINING DETAIL AND TEXTURE: You add more details to your outline of the cliff and branches in preparation for shading. SHADING REALISTIC TEXTURES: The textures of the tree branches, grass, tree trunk, and the shrubbery are rendered with light, medium and dark squirkling values. You’ve probably heard the old expression “A picture is worth a thousand words”. From this point forward in this project there are very few written instructions. The step by step illustrations show you what you need to draw. Suggested drawing supplies include good quality white drawing paper, graphite pencils, kneaded and vinyl erasers, and a ruler. Recommended for artists, aged ten to ninety-nine, who have limited drawing skills, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators 18 PAGES – 24 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada (Revised 2006)
  2. -2- SETTING UP YOUR DRAWING Before you draw the various textures of a rocky cliff and the branches and trunk of a tree, you need to plan a place for everything, sort of like a blueprint. Texture is the surface detail of an object, as defined in a drawing with various shading techniques. The senses of touch and sight help identify the surface texture of drawing subject. Shading refers to the various shades of gray (values) in a drawing that make drawings look three-dimensional. In this section you first choose and set up your drawing format with a simple grid, and then sketch the outline of the tree’s branches and the rocky cliff. Drawing format (sometimes called a drawing space) refers to the area of a drawing surface within a specific perimeter, outlined by a shape of any size, such as a square, rectangle or circle. A grid is a precise arrangement of a specific number of squares, of exact sizes, proportionately drawn on a photo (or drawing) and a drawing surface. Sketching is drawing a quick, rough representation or outline of a planned drawing subject. A sketch can also be a completed work of art. When you draw a human face, if your proportions are wrong, your drawing just won’t look correct. Not so with a tree, if the proportions are off, it really doesn’t matter. Proportion is the relationship in size of one component of a drawing to another or others. Have a look at these three drawings of trees. Even though the proportions are different, they all still look like trees. Some sizes to consider include: Illustration 09-01: a square format 4 by 4 (or 6 by 6) inches (a short thick tree) Illustration 09-02: a rectangular format 4 by 5 (or 6 by 7.5) inches (as used in this lesson) Illustration 09-03: a rectangular format 4 by 7 (or 6 by 10.5) inches (a tall slender tree) Feel free to draw your format any square or rectangular shape you prefer. Keep in mind that the shape you choose will affect the shape of your tree. ILLUSTRATION 09-03 ILLUSTRATION 09-02 ILLUSTRATION 09-01 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  3. -3- 1. Decide on a shape for your drawing format, and outline it on your drawing surface. ILLUSTRATION 09-04 2. Draw a simple grid within your drawing 1 2 format. Use a ruler to measure and find the center point of each of each of the four sides of your drawing format. Mark the center point on each side with a small dot. Divide your drawing format into four equal sections by connecting your dots vertically and horizontally. 3 4 3. Identify each of the four grid squares by number. You can simply keep their numbers in your mind, or very lightly write numbers 1 to 4 in the squares, as in Illustration 09-05. ILLUSTRATION 09-05 In the following two steps, you draw the cliff (from which the tree is growing) within your drawing format and. add the outlines of some small shrubs and grass. Illustration 09-05 shows what the outline of the cliff looks like within a 4 by 5 inch format. If your format isn’t this size, expect your drawing to look a little different. In illustrations 09-06 and 09-07, you find close-ups of the two lower grid sections, numbers 3 and 4, and detailed instructions on how to draw these two sections of the cliff. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  4. -4- 4. Draw the section of the cliff in the lower left square (#3) of your drawing format. Refer to Illustration 09-06. Focus on drawing only what you see inside this one rectangle (or square, if that is the format shape you chose). Use the following guidelines: Observe where the outline of the cliff touches the bottom side of your drawing format. It is approximately one-third of the way across from the left lower corner. Mark this point with a small dot. Take note of where the outline of the cliff touches the right side of your format. It’s a little more than two-thirds down the side. Mark this point with a small dot. Begin with the dot on the bottom side and draw a curved line upwards and towards the right. When you get to the highest point, (above the second dot) begin drawing the outline downwards and to the right. Continue until your line connects with the dot on the right side of your format. ILLUSTRATION 09-06 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  5. -5- 5. Draw a series of short lines to define the edge of the cliff on the right, as in grid square #4 (the lower right square) in Illustration 09-07. Use the following guidelines: Observe how the series of short lines look like grass. The lines curve in many different directions and some are short and others are longer. There are spaces between some and in some places several lines are joined together. Begin drawing where you left off at the dot you had marked on the right side of the lower left square (# 3, to the left of this square). Continue drawing lines toward the right and downward until you touch the left side of this square. ILLUSTRATION 09-07 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  6. -6- In the following four steps, you outline the shapes of the clusters of branches of the tree in preparation for shading. Shape refers to the outward outline of a form. Basic shapes include circles, squares and triangles. Shading refers to the various shades of gray (values) in a drawing that make drawings look three-dimensional. Drawing the shapes of the outlines exactly like mine is not important. However, you should draw each cluster of branches in approximately the same places and similar in size to mine. 6. Draw three clusters of branches (mostly inside grid square #4) in the lower right section of the drawing format. As you can see in Illustration 09-08, the clusters of branches are different shapes and sizes. A tiny part of the largest branch extends over the center line and is in grid square #3. ILLUSTRATION 09-08 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  7. -7- 7. Draw three more clusters of branches that are mostly in the upper right section of your drawing format (grid square #2). Refer to Illustration 09-09. Each of these clusters is similar in size, but their shapes are very different. The more you vary the shapes of your branches, the more realistic your tree will appear! Take note that tiny parts of each of them extends into adjourning sections of your drawing format. ILLUSTRATION 09-09 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  8. -8- 8. Draw the final three clusters in the upper sections of your drawing format, as in Illustration 09-10. One of them actually looks like the letter “Z” (totally an accident). Note that the one at the very top is smaller than the other two. 9. Use your kneaded eraser to erase all the grid lines and re-draw any sections that are accidentally erased. ILLUSTRATION 09-10 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  9. -9- ILLUSTRATION 09-11 OUTLINING DETAIL AND TEXTURE In this section, you add more details to your outline of the cliff and branches in preparation for shading. 10. Draw more grass and a small shrub on the top section of the cliff. As you can see in Illustration 09-11 and the close up in 09-12, the perimeter of the cliff is made up of numerous shapes and lines. ILLUSTRATION 09-12 Various straight, wiggly, and curved lines, and numerous shapes of different sizes, make up the perimeters of the branches of the tree. Illustration 09-13 shows the complete outline of all the branches. Illustration 09-14 shows you a close-up view so you can more clearly see how I have drawn the various lines and shapes. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  10. - 10 - ILLUSTRATION 09-13 11. Begin with the smaller branches at the top, and add more details to the perimeters of all the branches of the tree, as in Illustrations 09-13 and 09-14. ILLUSTRATION 09-14 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  11. - 11 - SHADING REALISTIC TEXTURES The textures of the tree branches, grass, tree trunk, and the shrubbery are rendered with squirkles. You’ve probably heard the old expression “A picture is worth a thousand words”. From this point forward in this project there are very few written instructions. The step by step illustrations show you what you need to draw. You use light, medium and dark squirkling values. Values are the different shades of gray created when you draw by varying both the density of the shading lines, and the pressure used in holding various pencils. In this drawing, light values are rendered with an HB pencil. A 2B pencil works well for medium values. A freshly sharpened 4B is great for the darkest values. 12. Add shading to the inside sections of each cluster of branches with squirkles. Refer to the illustration below and the close up of the branches in Illustration 09-16. ILLUSTRATION 09-15 I have chosen a light source from the left. Take note that some sections are darker than others, especially the right lower sections of each cluster of branches. Notice that my squirkle lines are lighter and farther apart for the lighter values. In the darker values, the lines are darker and closer together. If you notice that the transition between your values isn’t as smooth as you like, you can improve it. Try adding a few more short curvy lines in between some of your lines. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  12. - 12 - ILLUSTRATION 09-16 ILLUSTRATION 09-20 It’s time to connect all the branches of the tree by drawing the outline of the trunk of the tree, and adding its texture. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  13. - 13 - 13. Outline the curved trunk of the tree, which connects the branches to each other and the tree to the cliff. Take note that the trunk of the tree is curved, and is wider at the bottom than the top. 14. Add a few smaller branches without foliage close to the base of the tree. ILLUSTRATION 09-17 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  14. - 14 - 15. Add shading to the tree trunk with long skinny squirkles. The shading is lighter on the left than on the right. To make the texture of the trunk look rough, leave some very light sections showing on the left side. The illustration below shows the entire tree. In Illustrations 09-19 and 09-20 you see close ups of both the upper and lower sections. ILLUSTRATION 09-18 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  15. - 15 - ILLUSTRATION 09-19 The illustration to the right shows a close-up view of the bottom section of the tree. The upper tree trunk and clusters of branches are illustrated in the drawing below. ILLUSTRATION 09-20 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  16. - 16 - 16. Complete the shading of the cliff by referring to the following three illustrations. When the shading of the cliff is completed, the tree has a solid foundation and your drawing is ready to hang on your wall! ILLUSTRATION 09-21 Outline some irregular shapes to be the darkest sections of the rocky cliff and add dark shading with a 4B pencil. ILLUSTRATION 09-22 Outline more shapes in between the darkest sections of the cliff and add medium shading with a 2B pencil. ILLUSTRATION 09-23 Add shading to the top of the cliff, and draw a few more sections of grass around the base of the tree. 17. Have one last look at your drawing and change any sections you aren’t completely happy with. Refer to the final drawing in Illustration 09-24. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  17. - 17 - You can make some areas lighter by patting them with your kneaded eraser and others darker by adding more shading. You make sections of the cliff and branches darker by simply drawing more squirkle lines where you need them. ILLUSTRATION 09-24 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  18. - 18 - ☺☺ ☺ Sign your name, write today’s date on the back of your drawing, and hug a tree! BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, conté crayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning, and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing and painting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites. Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach to curriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. These sites are respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world. LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS BY BRENDA HODDINOTT Drawing for Dummies (2003): Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People (2004): Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
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