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Dudley The Dragon

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Dudley The Dragon

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  1. Brenda Hoddinott X-01 ADVANCED: FANTASY & FUN Meet Dudley – a former figment of my imagination, now the subject of this drawing project! You use a grid format to establish proportions and then outline the highly detailed dragon and his nest with thin neat lines. Suggestions are offered for more adventurous artists who choose to add color to their drawings. Suggested drawing supplies include good quality white drawing paper, graphite pencils, kneaded and vinyl erasers, and a pencil sharpener. This project is divided into the following seven sections: ¾ GLOSSARY OF ART TERMS ¾ INTRODUCTION: Dudley the dragon became a realistic entity when he hatched from an egg in my painting about self-discovery titled “Serendipity”. This project brings a baby dragon beyond paint on a canvas into the new world of a line drawing. ¾ SKETCHING PROPER PROPORTIONS: Setting up accurate proportions is the foundation of drawing. You first set up an intricate grid to help you sketch the dragon, nest, and the egg in their correct places. ¾ OUTLINING WITH A FINE-TIP MARKER: You use a sharp eye, a very steady hand, lots of patience, and a fine tip marker to outline this cartoon. ¾ ADDING FINAL TOUCHES: The options for completing this drawing are limited only by human imagination! 19 PAGES – 20 ILLUSTRATIONS This advanced project is recommended for artists with good drawing skills, from age 12 to adult, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada – March, 2005
  2. -2- GLOSSARY OF ART TERMS Contour drawing: is a drawing comprised of lines that follow the contours of the edges of various components of a drawing subject and define the outlines of its forms. Contour lines: are lines that are formed when the shared edges of spaces and/or objects meet. Curved lines: are created when a straight line curves (or bends). Curved lines can be drawn thick or thin. Drawing space (sometimes called a drawing format): refers to the area of a drawing surface within a specific perimeter, outlined by a shape of any size, such as a square, rectangle or circle. Grid: is a precise arrangement of a specific number of squares, of exact sizes, proportionately drawn on both a photo and drawing surface. Grids help artists with numerous challenges, such as rendering precise proportions and correct perspective. Highlight: refers to the brightest area of a form where light bounces off its surface and is usually the section closest to the light source. Iris of an eye: is the colored circular section of the eyeball surrounding the pupil. Proportion: is the relationship in size of one component of a drawing to another or others. Pupil of an eye: is the darkest circular shape within the iris, which adjusts its size under different lighting conditions. Rough sketch: refers to a quickly rendered drawing that illustrates the important elements of your drawing subject with very few details. Sketching: refers to the method used for creating a quick, rough representation or outline of a planned drawing subject. A sketch can also be a completed work of art. Shape: refers to the outward outline of a form. Basic shapes include circles, squares and triangles. INTRODUCTION Dudley the dragon was born of my imagination and became a realistic entity when he hatched from an egg in my painting about self-discovery titled “Serendipity”. This project brings a baby dragon beyond paint on a canvas, into the new world of a line drawing. You use a grid format to establish proportions and then outline the highly detailed dragon and his nest with thin neat lines. I have included an image of the painting of Dudley as a reference for artists who would prefer to add color after the initial sketch is completed, rather than render a detailed contour drawing outlined in ink. If you are skilled in working with colored pencils (or other color media), may I suggest that you complete the entire drawing very lightly in pencil and then add colors of your choice to complete your artwork. Naturally, the final drawing will not look identical to my painted image, but depending on your skill level, can easily become an outstanding drawing. Refer to Illustrations 01-01, 01-02, and 01-03 to compare a color image to a line drawing. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  3. -3- The following was written by my best friend and speaks well of the philosophy of my painting: “As children, we entered into a world with the utmost of innocence, curiosity, trust and unconditional love. We walked our first steps in the journey of self-discovery, through many challenges, hardships and triumphs. Each day that we strive to become the person we are meant to be – we become a role model, who has the ability to assist with the self-discovery of others.” ILLUSTRATION 01-01 The above text is used with the permission of © Robert A. Roughley B.A., B.Ed., B.AEd. M.Ed., MC, CCC . ILLUSTRATION 01-02 ILLUSTRATION 01-03 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  4. -4- SKETCHING PROPER PROPORTIONS Setting up accurate proportions is the foundation of drawing. In this project, you first set up a grid to help you sketch the dragon, nest, and the egg in their correct places. 1. Use a ruler to draw a square and divide it into 49 smaller squares. Keep your lines very light! Suggested sizes include: 7 by 7 inches (with 1 inch squares), 11.5 or 11.5 (with 1.5 inch squares), or 14 by 14 (with 2 inch squares). 2. Letter each square along the top and bottom (A to G) and number each square down each side (1 to 7)) to help you keep track of where you are working. 3. Lightly sketch what you see inside each of the lower three rows of squares. Refer to Illustration 01-04 and the close-ups of these sections on the next two pages (Illustrations 01-05 to 01-07). Use the numbers and letters along the sides of the grid to keep track of where you are drawing, especially in the close-up images. ILLUSTRATION 01-04 Keep your sketch lines very light! In this illustration the lines look dark. However, in fact they are so light that I can barely see them. I have made them look darker in a computer program so you can see them. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  5. -5- Draw your outlines slowly and carefully! Pay close attention to the grid lines to make sure you draw the various lines in their proper places. Double check the proportions of each section of your sketch by visually measuring the shapes of the positive and negative spaces. ILLUSTRATION 01-05 Remember; don’t press too hard with your pencils. Not only do these areas become impossible to erase or touch up, but they also leave dents in your paper. All the lines you draw now will either need to be completely erased or made lighter in the next sections. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  6. -6- ILLUSTRATION 01-06 ILLUSTRATION 01-07 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  7. -7- 4. Use a freshly sharpened HB pencil to very lightly outline the shapes of Dudley’s head, eyes, face, neck, arms, and lower body. 5. Add the triangular shapes down Dudley’s lower back. 6. Sketch the parts of Dudley’s tail. 7. Draw the outline of a piece of eggshell as in columns E and F, rows 6 and 7. ILLUSTRATION 01-08 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  8. -8- 8. Add Dudley’s wings and the stripes on his neck, chest, and tummy. Pay close attention to the directions in which the stripes are angled on his neck and chest; some are angled upward and others angle downward. Also, note the curved lines that mark the stripes on the lower section of his tummy. ILLUSTRATION 01-09 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  9. -9- 9. Sketch Dudley’s ears and the triangular shapes on the top of his head. 10. Add his lower jaw and mouth behind his tongue. ILLUSTRATION 01-10 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  10. - 10 - ILLUSTRATION 01-11 11. Sketch the edge of the lower eyelid. 12. Add the irises, pupils, and highlights. 13. Add his two nostrils. 14. Follow the grid squares carefully and draw the large egg shape, the smaller one behind it (close to Dudley’s tummy), and the partial egg shell on the left (as in Illustration 01-12). 15. Add the rest of the twigs that make up the nest. ILLUSTRATION 01-12 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  11. - 11 - 16. Check over your drawing carefully and make sure you are happy with your sketch. If you want a more realistic rendition of Dudley, you may not want your drawing outlined with a fine tip marker. No instructions are included for drawing in color; however, you may choose to use the painting of Dudley (page 3) or the illustration I colored in Photoshop (page 19) as guidelines. You also have the option of using your imagination to color your drawing any way you prefer, such as using a computer painting program. Consider erasing your grid lines and making your sketch lines very faint before you begin. ILLUSTRATION 01-13 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  12. - 12 - OUTLINING WITH A FINE-TIP MARKER You need a very steady hand to outline a cartoon. Take some time and practice drawing solid curved lines and shapes on scrap paper before you begin. Also, don’t forget to test your marker on some scrap paper to make sure that it doesn’t smudge, or your drawing may be ruined! By the way, even after the drawing is completely outlined, you still have the option of adding color (as in the illustration on page 19). The following instructions and illustrations guide you through the process of outlining this drawing with a fine tip permanent black marker: 17. Use your kneaded eraser to lighten your grid and sketch lines until they are so light that you can barely see them. 18. Take your time and draw your outlines VERY slowly and carefully! As you draw, fill in the additional details shown in each of the following five illustrations. Constantly compare your drawing to mine and double check your proportions. Pay close attention to the lengths, angles, and curves of the hatching lines. ILLUSTRATION 01-14 Most markers smudge if you touch your lines too soon - always place a piece of clean paper under your hand as you draw. Each time you work on a new section, move your paper so it’s always under your hand. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  13. - 13 - ILLUSTRATION 01-15 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  14. - 14 - ILLUSTRATION 01-16 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  15. - 15 - ILLUSTRATION 01-17 Make sure you test the permanence of the marker lines in a tiny corner section before you try to erase all the graphite. Some types of markers will smudge even when they are dry! If this is the case, use your kneaded eraser to gently pat the pencil lines instead of rubbing them. 19. Use your kneaded and/or vinyl eraser to erase the grid and sketch lines. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  16. - 16 - ADDING FINAL TOUCHES The options for completing this drawing are limited only by human imagination! You can even make copies of your drawing and see how many different versions you can create. 20. Complete your drawing any way you prefer! Check out the following three versions to start your creative juices flowing. 21. Sign your name, put today’s date on the back of your drawing, and put a big smile on your face! ILLUSTRATION 01-18 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  17. - 17 - ILLUSTRATION 01-19 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  18. - 18 - ILLUSTRATION 01-20 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
  19. - 19 - BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, conté crayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning, and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 1992, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 1994, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing and painting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 1998, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites. Drawspace http://www.drawspace.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach to curriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world. LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS BY BRENDA HODDINOTT Drawing for Dummies (2003): Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People (2004): Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web site http://www.finearteducation.com or http://www.drawspace.com
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