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Science at war

Xem 1-20 trên 26 kết quả Science at war
  • One of the consequences of raising children in this world is that they make you think a lot more about the future. Because of the storms brewing in China, the future our children now face appears to be, at best, highly uncertain. At worst, it could be one that the philosopher Thomas Hobbes might describe as “nasty” and “brutish”—if no longer short.

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  • By playing a role in the near-annihilation of a species, Theodore Roosevelt, the president of the United States at the turn of the twentieth century, unwittingly laid the groundwork for the most dramatic triumph yet in the use of artificial insemination (AI) to rescue a species from extinction. In the early 1900s, waves of immigrants from Europe settled in the American Midwest. As humans transformed the land, they declared war on a perceived pest: the prairie dog.

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  • The years 1945–55 saw the emergence of a radically new kind of device: the high-speed stored-program digital computer. Secret wartime projects in areas such as code-breaking, radar and ballistics had produced a wealth of ideas and technologies that kick-started this first decade of the Information Age. The brilliant mathematician and code-breaker Alan Turing was just one of several British pioneers whose prototype machines led the way. Turning theory into practice proved tricky, but by 1948 five UK research groups had begun to build practical stored-program computers.

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  • ver fifty years ago, Vannevar Bush released his enormously influential report, Science, the Endless Frontier, which asserted a dichotomy between basic and applied science. This view was at the core of the compact between government and science that led to the golden age of scientific research after World War II--a compact that is currently under severe stress. In this book, Donald Stokes challenges Bush's view and maintains that we can only rebuild the relationship between government and the scientific community when we understand what is wrong with that view.

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  • About Nicoll: Maurice Nicoll, born at the Manse in Kelso, Scotland was the son of William Robertson Nicoll, a preacher of the Free Church of Scotland. He studied Science at Cambridge, before going on to St. Bartholomew's Hospital, and in Vienna, Berlin and Zurich where he became a colleague of Carl Gustav Jung. Jung's psychological relevations and his work with Jung during this period left a lasting influence on young Maurice. After his Army Medical Service in the 1914 War in Gallipoli and Mesopotamia he returned to England to become a psychiatrist.

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  • The mode of action of pesticides is extremely fascinating because the subject covers so many fields of biology and chemistry and has many practical implications. All disciplines of biology have developed greatly since 1,1,1-trichloro- di-(4-chlorophenyl)ethane — better known as DDT — and the other synthetic pesticides were introduced just after the Second World War.

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  • Since the Second World War, and especially since the publication of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring in 1962, there has been growing concern about contamination of the environment by “man-made” chemicals. These chemicals may be present in industrial and municipal effluents, in consumer or commercial products, in mine tailings, in petroleum products, and in gaseous emissions. Some chemicals such as pesticides may be specifically designed to kill biota present in natural or agricultural ecosystems. They may be organic, inorganic, metallic, or radioactive in nature.

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  • Because American ecocriticism, as a movement, is only about a dozen years old, generalizations about it are hard to make and still harder to validate.1 So I want to begin, not by describing the principles and practices of ecocriticism in any detail (in fact, that is something I want to delay, especially as regards the practices, until chapter four), but by looking at what seems to be, for many of its adherents, ecocriticism’s moment of origin, which is threefold in its implications.

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  • The past century has seen a tremendous expansion in the number of synthetic chemicals employed by humankind as materials, drugs, preservatives for foods and other products, pesticides, cleaning agents, and even weapons of war. An estimated 64,000 chemicals are currently in use commercially, with 5 billion tons being produced annually in the world. Some 4000 chemicals are used as medicinals and at least 1200 more as household products. An estimated 700 new chemicals are synthesized each year.

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  • Nicolaus Copernicus and Galileo Galilei developed the scientific knowledge that became the underpinning of spaceflight. Edward Everett Hale in ‘‘The Brick Moon’’ and Jules Verne in ‘‘From the Earth to the Moon’’ dreamed and wrote about it. But finally in the last half of the twentieth century, it was the Americans and the Soviet Russians, locked in the throes of the Cold War, who accomplished it. A good case can be made that when historians look back at the twentieth century, the initial efforts of humankind to slip ‘‘the surly bonds of Earth’’ will play a dominant role....

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  • About Nourse: Alan Nourse was born August 11, 1928 to Benjamin and Grace (Ogg) Nourse in Des Moines, Iowa. He attended high school in Long Island, New York. He served in the U.S. Navy after World War II. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in 1951 from Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey. He married Ann Morton on June 11, 1952 in Lynden, New Jersey. He received a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree in 1955 from the University of Pennsylvania. He served his one year internship at Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle, Washington. He practiced medicine in North Bend,...

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  • Alan Nourse was born August 11, 1928 to Benjamin and Grace (Ogg) Nourse in Des Moines, Iowa. He attended high school in Long Island, New York. He served in the U.S. Navy after World War II. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in 1951 from Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey. He married Ann Morton on June 11, 1952 in Lynden, New Jersey. He received a Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) degree in 1955 from the University of Pennsylvania. He served his one year internship at Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle, Washington. He practiced medicine in North Bend, Washington from...

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  • About Sohl: Gerald Allan Sohl Sr. (December 2, 1913 - November 4, 2002) was a scriptwriter for The Twilight Zone (as a ghostwriter for Charles Beaumont), Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Outer Limits, Star Trek and other shows. He also wrote novels, feature film scripts, and the nonfiction works Underhanded Chess and Underhanded Bridge in 1973.

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  • About Shaara: Michael Shaara (June 23, 1928 - May 5, 1988) was an American writer of science fiction, sports fiction, and historical fiction. He was born to Italian immigrant parents (the family name was originally spelled Sciarra, which in Italian is pronounced the same way) in Jersey City, New Jersey, graduated from Rutgers University in 1951, and served as a sergeant in the 82nd Airborne division prior to the Korean War. Before Shaara began selling science fiction stories to fiction magazines in the 1950s, he was an amateur boxer and police officer.

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  • .About Kornbluth: Cyril Michael Kornbluth (July 23, 1923–March 21, 1958 — pen-names: Cecil Corwin, S.D. Gottesman, Edward J. Bellin, Kenneth Falconer, Walter C. Davies, Simon Eisner, Jordan Park) was an American science fiction author and a notable member of the Futurians. Kornbluth was born in New York City. Kornbluth served in the US Army during World War II (European Theatre). He received a Bronze Star for his service in the Battle of the Bulge. After his discharge, he returned to finish his education, which had been interrupted by the war, at the University of Chicago...

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  • It was in the Fall of nineteen seventeen at an officers' training camp that I first became acquainted with John Carter, War Lord of Barsoom, through the pages of your novel "A Princess of Mars." The story made a profound impression upon me and while my better judgment assured me that it was but a highly imaginative piece of fiction, a suggestion of the verity of it pervaded my inner consciousness to such an extent that I found myself dreaming of Mars and John Carter, of Dejah Thoris, of Tars Tarkas and of Woola as if they had been entities of my own experience rather than the figments...

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  • Everything was perfectly swell. There were no prisons, no slums, no insane asylums, no cripples, no poverty, no wars. All diseases were conquered. So was old age. Death, barring accidents, was an adventure for volunteers. The population of the United States was stabilized at forty-million souls. One bright morning in the Chicago Lying-in Hospital, a man named Edward K. Wehling, Jr., waited for his wife to give birth. He was the only man waiting. Not many people were born a day any more.

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  • He was born in Seacombe, Wallasey, on the Wirral peninsula near Liverpool, the only son of William Clibbert Stapledon and Emmeline Miller. The first six years of his life were spent with his parents at Port Said. He was educated at Abbotsholme School and Balliol College, Oxford, where he acquired a BA in Modern History in 1909 and a Master's degree in 1913[citation needed]. After a brief stint as a teacher at Manchester Grammar School, he worked in shipping offices in Liverpool and Port Said from 1910 to 1913.

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  • This is the story of an idea and how it played about in the minds of a number of intelligent people. Whether there was any reality behind this idea it is not the business of the storyteller to say. The reader must judge for himself. One man believed it without the shadow of a doubt and he shall be the principal figure in the story. Maybe we have not heard the last of this idea. It spread from the talk of a few people into magazines and the popular press. It had a vogue. You certainly heard of it at the time though perhaps you have forgotten. Popular attention...

    pdf110p hotmoingay8 26-01-2013 29 1   Download

  • William Hope Hodgson (November 15, 1877 – April 1918) was an English author. He produced a large body of work, consisting of essays, short fiction, and novels, spanning several overlapping genres including horror, fantastic fiction and science fiction. Early in his writing career he dedicated effort to poetry, although few of his poems were published during his lifetime. He also attracted some notice as a photographer and achieved some renown as a bodybuilder. He died in World War I at the age of 40.

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