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Overlapping Silly Faces

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Overlapping Silly Faces

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  1. SILLY FACES Brenda Hoddinott E-02 BEGINNER: PERSPECTIVE ONE Pretend you’re inside a spaceship, flying through the galaxy, while looking outward into space through a square window. Suddenly, you see a whole bunch of silly faces floating toward you! They appear bigger and bigger the closer they move toward you. In this fun lesson, a group of silly faces seem to be floating through space. Overlapping, as a component of geometric perspective, is introduced as a means of creating depth. Four elements of perspective are used in this lesson: Overlapping: Most silly faces in this project overlap others; Size Differences: The farther away objects are, the smaller they appear to be; Atmospheric Perspective: The outlines of the faces need to become gradually lighter in value as they appear to recede into distant space; and Arrangement: Those faces that are closer to the viewer are drawn closer to the bottom of the drawing space. This lesson is divided into the following two sections: ¾ INTRODUCTION: An illustrated discussion explores the process of creating the illusion of three-dimensional reality with four elements of perspective. ¾ OVERLAPPING SILLY FACES: You draw nine overlapping faces, from the closest to the farthest away, which appear to recede into the distance as they float through space. As for their individual shapes and facial features – feel free to use your imagination. Suggested drawing supplies for this project include HB, 2B, and 4B graphite pencils, a vinyl eraser, a ruler, and good quality drawing paper This project is recommended for artists of all ages, as well as home schooling, academic and recreational fine art educators. 9 PAGES – 13 ILLUSTRATIONS Published by Hoddinott Fine Art Publishers, Halifax, NS, Canada – 2003 (Revised 2006)
  2. 2 INTRODUCTION Suggested drawing supplies for this project include HB, 2B, and 4B graphite pencils, a vinyl eraser, a ruler, and good quality drawing paper ILLUSTRATION 02-01 Assume that, in reality, all the silly faces you are about to draw are exactly the same size. However, to create the illusion of three-dimensional reality, some need to be drawn large, while others need to be quite tiny. Examine Illustration 02-01 to get an idea of how the silly faces should look when finished. Each is numbered from 1 to 9, according to the sequence in which they will be drawn – 1 is first and 9 last. Refer to this illustration as you read about how the following four elements of perspective are used to create the illusion of depth in this specific drawing: Overlapping: When one object is in front of another, it is obviously closer. Most silly faces in this project overlap (appear to be in front of) others. Overlapping, as a component of perspective, gives the illusion of depth in a drawing and refers to the positions of the subjects, when one visually appears to be in front of another (or others). A noticeable clue is provided when a section of one seems to be missing. However, it’s not really missing - the one in front of it is merely blocking your line of vision. Size differences: The farther away objects are, the smaller they appear to be. As the numbers get higher from 1 to 9, each face is rendered progressively smaller – number 1 is larger than number 2 and so on. Number 9 is the smallest of all! As you progress through each step of this project, make sure every silly face you draw is slightly smaller than the previous one. Atmospheric Perspective: The farther an object recedes into the distance, the lighter in value it seems to become due to the presence of various particles in the atmosphere. Values are the different shades of gray created in a drawing by various means, such as using different grades of pencils, varying the density of the shading lines and/or the pressure used in holding a pencil. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  3. 3 In this drawing, the outlines of the faces need to become gradually lighter in value as the numbers get higher. To create this illusion, use a 4B pencil (dark) to draw number 1 and 2, a 2B pencil (medium) for numbers 3 to 5, and an HB (lighter) for numbers 6 to 9. Arrangement: When subjects are viewed below the horizon line, objects that are closer need to be drawn closer to the bottom of the drawing space. The horizon line: (also known as eye level) refers to an imaginary horizontal line that divides your line of vision when you look straight ahead. In this drawing, the horizon line is not marked, but is above the silly faces. Hence, those faces that are closer to the viewer are drawn closer to the bottom of the drawing space. Conversely, those that are farthest away are drawn closer to the top of the drawing space. The higher the numbers, the higher up each face appears within the drawing space. Drawing space refers to the area in which you render a drawing within a specific perimeter. It can be the shape of your paper or outlined by any shape you choose, such as a rectangle or square. OVERLAPPING SILLY FACES In this fun lesson, groups of overlapping silly faces appear to recede into the distance as they float through space. As for their individual shapes and faces – feel free to use your imagination. 1) Draw a square to represent your drawing space. Your square can be any size you wish. Suggested sizes include 4 inches by 4 inches, 6 inches by 6 inches, or 8 inches by 8 inches. ILLUSTRATION 02-02 2) Use a wiggly line to draw a big sideways C in the lower one- third of your drawing space. Use a 4B pencil. The line does not need to have its wiggles the same as in my drawing. However, pay attention to its size and position within the lower section of the drawing space. Also note that one end of this line touches the bottom side of the square closer to the left than the right. The other end touches the right side of the square near the bottom. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  4. 4 Before you attempt to draw these cartoon eyes, you need to be familiar with the names of each part. Refer to the next drawing and the following terms: ILLUSTRATION 02-03 A highlight is the brightest area where light bounces off the surface of the eye. The iris is the colored circular section of the eyeball. The white of the eye is the visible section of the eyeball. ILLUSTRATION 02-04 3) Draw eyes on the large face. Begin by drawing two ovals and then add a large circle (the iris) in the upper section of each. Outline a tiny circle (the highlight0 inside each large circle. highlights helps make eyes look shiny. 4) Use your 4B pencil to completely shade in the top half of each eye, but remember to leave the highlight white. ILLUSTRATION 02-05 Don’t worry if your silly faces don’t look exactly like mine. If you wish, you can use your imagination and create your own eyes (and mouths) for each of the nine silly faces, Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  5. 5 ILLUSTRATION 02-06 5) Draw an outline of a smaller silly face behind the first. This face appears higher within the drawing space – the top is slightly above the halfway point of the height of the square drawing space. Each end touches the outline of the first. Hence the first face is overlapping (in front of) this one. 6) Draw the eyes and mouth on the second silly face. Note that the eyes and mouth on the second silly face are at an angle. ILLUSTRATION 02-07 7) Draw the outline of the third, even smaller, silly face with a 2B pencil. 8) Add its eyes and mouth. The eyes and nose on the third silly face are also at an angle. ILLUSTRATION 02-08 Take note that the three silly faces are three different sizes with the largest in the front, and the smaller ones appearing to be behind it. The first one you drew looks closer than the other two, because it is largest in size, lowest within the drawing space, and overlaps the others. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  6. 6 ILLUSTRATION 02-09 9) Draw the outline of the fourth face, and add its eyes and mouth. The fourth face is slightly smaller than the third. Its outline looks like a backward C-shape with its ends touching the left side of the drawing space. ILLUSTRATION 02-10 10) Add the fifth face, eyes and mouth. This face is on the far right of the drawing space, and slightly above and to the right of the third face. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  7. 7 ILLUSTRATION 02-11 11) Draw the outline of the sixth face, and add its eyes and mouth. This face is slightly smaller than the fifth, and on the left of the drawing space, slightly higher and a little above the fourth silly face. ILLUSTRATION 02-12 12) Add the seventh Happy (or is it Grumpy) face slightly behind the fifth face. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  8. 8 13) Draw the two smallest faces. The smallest is higher in the drawing space than all the rest, and its upper section is hidden behind the upper edge. If you want, you can use colored pencils to have some creative fun adding color to the faces and background. Sign your name, put the date on the back of your drawing paper, put a silly smile on your face and give yourself a big hug! ILLUSTRATION 02-13 Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
  9. 9 BRENDA HODDINOTT - BIOGRAPHY As a self-educated teacher, visual artist, portraitist, forensic artist, and illustrator, Brenda Hoddinott utilizes diverse art media including graphite, technical pen, colored pencil, chalk pastel, charcoal, conté crayon, and oil paints. My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. Hence, in creating a passion for the subject matter, the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. >Brenda Hoddinott< Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. She developed strong technical competencies with a personal commitment to self directed learning, and the aid of assorted “Learn to Draw” books. During Brenda’s twenty-five year career as a self-educated civilian forensic artist, numerous criminal investigation departments have employed Brenda’s skills, including Royal Canadian Mounted Police and municipal police departments. In 2792, Brenda was honored with a commendation from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and in 2794, she was awarded a Certificate of Membership from “Forensic Artists International”. Her home-based art career included graphic design, and teaching recreational drawing and painting classes. As supervisor of her community’s recreational art department, Brenda hired and trained teachers, and designed curriculum for several children’s art programs. In 2798, Brenda chose to end her eighteen-year career as an art educator in order to devote more time to writing, drawing, painting, and developing her websites. Fine Art Education http://www.finearteducation.com incorporates her unique style and innovative approach to curriculum development. This site offers downloadable and printable drawing classes for students of all abilities from the age of eight through adult. Students of all ages, levels and abilities have praised the simple step-by-step instructional approach. This site is respected as a resource for fine art educators, home schooling programs, and educational facilities throughout the world. LEARN-TO-DRAW BOOKS BY BRENDA HODDINOTT Drawing for Dummies (2003): Wiley Publishing, Inc., New, York, NY, this 336 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People (2004): Winner of the Alpha-Penguin Book of the Year Award 2004, Alpha - Pearson Education – Macmillan, Indianapolis, IN, this 360 page book is available on various websites and in major bookstores internationally. Copyright to all articles, images, text, projects, lessons and exercises within this drawing class belong to Brenda Hoddinott and may not be reproduced or used for any commercial purposes whatsoever without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott. E-mail bhoddinott@hoddinott.com Web sites http://www.finearteducation.com and http://www.drawspace.com
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